#CreatepreneurAfrica Neil Schell, A story of visually connecting continents

 

Director and producer, Neil Schell,originally from North America and spanning a film and television career for three decades, arrived on Africa's entertainment scene and made a world of visual impact, beyond continents when he teamed up with renowned Kenyan actress Scolly Cheruto. 

As managing director of Cheruscopic Productions, the team has reached phenomenal heights. Currently, they are in development of an animation  African superhero series called MAXUS, Mogaka na Chema, a Kiswahili comedy, as well as OASIS, a co-production with Canada and South Africa supported by the Canadian Media fund and the National film and Video Foundation in South Africa

Neil  Schell has featured in renowned international shows like ‘ The Watchmen’, ‘A Team’ and Fringe. Bridging the continental gap between North America and Africa,  as a mentor and business partner at a leading production house in Kenya,Cheruscopic Production.Combined talents  brought together creative wonders like 39 episodes of a Kiswahili comedy called LokoLoko and thirteen episodes of an English drama, Twisted, as well as 26 Episodes of an English drama called Monica amongst many others.

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He is passionate about sharing skills in ongoing actors and apprentice workshops with continous workshops between tight schedules.

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A recent social media post by Neil Schell that caught the attention of the #CreatePreneurAfrica research group was an Actors Core Group 2019 course for actors to produce their own projects an take charge of their roles.

It reflected the boom stage of the film and television industry and the constant need for quality content.  It was a call out for actors aspiring to produce their own works and launching a career without ever looking back.

The #CreatePreneurAfrica team reached out regarding a feature film project in development, #SHUJAA, Kiroho Mtoto….#LANGUAGEREVOLUTION regarding a ‘warrior’ lead role envisioned to be played by none other than Lupyana Kihaka, a Tanzanian actor.

#CreateprenuerAfrica – Proudly Tanzanian Actor – Kihaka GND

Neil Schell came on board and agreed to support the project. Cheruscopic Productions were brought on board to join the #LANGUAGEREVOLUTION  as the executive producers of  #SHUJAA, Kiroho Mtoto_Mtoto wa kiroho kurudisha ulimwengu wetu #Warrior_ Spirit child taking back our earth… envisioned to be ‘the feature film of the millennium’

#Language revolution!
“Úshujaa  : Mtoto wa kiroho kurudisha ulimwengu wetu
#WARRIOR
*spirit child taking back our earth

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Meet  the passion of Africa, beyond continental borders  #CreatePreneurAfrica Neil Schell

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Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My passion is to tell stories with the purpose of connecting Africa with North America so the people of both continents begin to understand each other more. Right now there is this huge misconception between their inhabitants.

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How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I wanted to be a part of the film and TV industries when I was around 16 years old.   But it took me a while to find my place.  It’s kind of been a continuous discovery over the past 4 decades.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The freedom to create, to communicate on a large scale about things that matter and with that communication being able to inspire others to improve conditions for themselves and others.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

It  came hand-in-hand with wanting to reach as many people as possible.  The film and TV industries are the vehicle to achieve my passion and at the professional, money-making level the most people are communicated to

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

 Way back around 1983.

  What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Just somehow knowing that I was meant to do this line of work.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

The excitement I have for the projects I am working on.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I would have to say, “I know you couldn’t see it in me then but I am glad you can see it in me now.”

 What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

Be persistent and professional and never stop learning.  Enthusiasm is contagious. Spread it!

#CreatepreneurAfrica, Igniting Business Sparks, Ghana’s Oscar Bimpong

Visionary leader, Oscar Bimpong, is set in his life purpose to have a positive impact globally and transform businesses.

Author, lecturer, transformational speaker, business consultant, and corporate trainer,Oscar Bimpong is the CEO and founder of Train2inspire Consultancy that sparked off in a 2010 launch.

His passion of motivational speaking as a mentor and coach has led him to forums in Africa and the UK as a guest at motivational speech assemblies, schools, colleges and universities.

“Living in Ghana brings fond memories as it is the best part of my life. It is what shaped my vision and my passion in life. Some of the difficult circumstances I encountered growing up is one of the reasons why I am in the position that I find myself in. It thought me the power of persistence and created the mindset to use the scarce resources at my disposal to achieve my vision against all odds”_   Oscar Bimpong

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“I believe a life without a vision is like a journey with no destination in mind”    Oscar Bimpong

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“I believe a life without a vision is like a journey with no destination in mind”    Oscar Bimpong

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He is currently working on the manuscript of two books: 

Leadership Lens: A Spectacle that fits everyone

 Mindset Revolution - Re-engineering the Mind from Prison to Purpose

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Meet  # CreatePreneurAfrica, OSCAR BIMPONG

A visionary leader paving promising economic pathways of success!

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I have been asked this question of what drives me the umpteenth time and my answer hasn’t changed over the years.

My mandate on earth is to help as many people that I can to realise their vision and to live their full potential in life.

I believe a life without a vision is like a journey with no destination in mind.

My mission is to help people and organisations to identify where they are and where they want to be and to develop a plan to get there. That is every vision must have a passion that fuels it.

For me, the testimonies I get from the people are the fuel that ignites my passion on a consistent basis.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

In relation to when I discovered my passion, I can say at a younger age. My dad, Edward Bimpong, inspired me at a younger age.

He is the one that told me that, Oscar, always pursue your own vision even if you have a full-time job.

This statement is ingrained in my mind such that it is part and parcel of my life. However, my passion was ignited after University. I have exploited different businesses over the last two decades until I found out what my true purpose on earth is.

That is the teacher in me was brought to bear in the last decade, leading me to become a motivational speaker, a business trainer and a consultant.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

The fact is not every passion starts to make money from the first day you identify it. That is the reality on the ground. Many in life are disappointed not just because they are not good at their trade but because their concentration on money prevented them from having opportunities to exhibit what they are passionate about.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I remember the first time I made money from speaking was about five years ago after working on my vision for three years prior to that. Since then, more doors have opened to me to speak on different platforms across the globe. My initial sacrifice of giving my services for a free paved way for others to know what I’m worth and what I can do to the best of my ability.

Can you define the root of your passion. What makes it personally appealing to you?

What I have got to understand over the years is that if you identify your purpose, giving up begins to become extinct in pursuit of your vision. Your purpose becomes a hobby. I have never seen anyone in life that has given up on their hobby just because they are encountering challenges in pursuing it. Many always give up in life because their God-given purpose is not aligned to their vision.

Furthermore, my source of motivation every day comes from God and secondly my conscious effort to bring a difference in the lives of the people I encounter on the daily basis. The more I get results, the more motivated I become. Meaning consistency in pursuit of any vision is critical to the success of that vision.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

To the people who doubted me, especially from family and friends, I have got to a stage in life where I have discovered that they are part of your success journey.

I always advise people that, those that doubted you should not make you feel bad or emotional, but they should be a source of inspiration, not to prove them wrong, but to let your success story inspire hope in them and ignite their vision as well. That is, I want them to say to themselves:

“If you could do it, then we can achieve our dreams too”

 What advise do you give to aspiring createpreneurs who look up to you?

My advice to anyone aspiring or pursuing their vision is to understand that this is a journey and not a destination. Success is not an overnight phenomenon but a continuous effort to become a better version of yourself or vision on a daily basis. The moment you have the passion for instant success, that is the moment you start to fail.

Patience, tenacity, hard work with a strategic focus and a positive mindset coupled with self-belief is what you need to survive in the market of pursuing your own vision.

It is never an easy journey, but having role models that have done what you want to achieve is one source of inspiration to let you know that it is possible.

That is I want to assure you that it is possible if only you believe.

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#CreatePreneurAfrica, South Africa’s Soul Rhythm Singing Sensation, ‘Yolisa Dumez’

Welcome to the soul sounds of Yolisa Dumezweni. After working as a professional forensic analyst for a full year, she decided to follow her inspirational lifelong calling and seed a career in music.

Her passionate voice churns out rhythmic melodies of inspiration, hope and  unconditional love that reaches out with tunes depicting a world of possibilities where anything is possible!

Born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa, rooted in a Xhosa ancestry,  her music-loving soul was captured at an early age. She was only four years old when she attentively listened to the tunes of Tracy Chapman and hummed along.

Early beginnings sparked off when she was discovered by a primary school teacher who invited her to sing at the school assembly.

Balancing career and family, the single mother moved to Melbourne in 2013 and pursued her studies at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia majoring in  Bachelor of Accounting. In 2018, after a year of working as a forensic analyst, she decided to pursue a musical career. And the year is rhythmically sparking off in soul sounds and she has upcoming performances with  David Marama!

 

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#CreatePreneur Africa – Lake Likoma Island’s David Marama – African ambassador, Malawi’s pride

 

‘‘The challenges that I faced over the years have led my passion to share my stories and inspire all around me to be the best versions of themselves through the power of music’            Yolisa Dumez  

 

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Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica – Yolisa Dumez’ Soul sounds from South Africa

 

https://www.instagram.com/yolisadumez/

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

The process of becoming. I’ve had to learn, sometimes in painful ways, that “it is not about the destination, it is about the journey”.

When you are aligned to who you truly are, you are able to appreciate even the contrast you come across on your way to your dreams. My journey as a singer was always a difficult one, which is why it took me so many years to confidently step into my dreams without fear of being criticised.

And the thing that surprised me the most, is that the person who criticised me more than anyone, is me. I felt that my voice wasn’t sweet enough like the girls a sang with at church because mine was always characterized as husky.

But I’ve since learned to embrace the uniqueness of my voice, as I’ve learned over the years that the best songs have always been the songs that touched people to their core and made them feel unconditional love and passion. And that is my hope whenever I sing; that I touch someone enough to make them feel like anything is possible.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I started singing since I was a little girl. My mother loves telling the story of how at four years old, I would sit on the couch next to the record player, and listen attentively to Tracey Chapman’s songs.

But I didn’t know I could sing until I was 12 years old when I was “discovered” by one of my teachers in primary school, who fell in love with a poem I’d written for her class. She was also a pianist and asked me if I’d like to join her in singing a song in front of the whole school during an assembly. I agreed. And when the moment came, as I began to sing, I felt fear leave and something unexplainable but exhilarating come over me.

I guess you could say it’s a knowing I’ve always had, that whenever I stood in front of people, either to speak or sing I was connecting to my true self.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

The opportunity to work with people from all walks of life, and sharing experiences. I like to use music as a platform to tell my story in order to inspire and uplift others.

What drove you to make money from your passion? 

Shortly after I graduated in 2016, I was offered an opportunity to work at one of the Big 4 firms in Melbourne. It was an opportunity to work with the best of the best in the field, plus it looked good on my resume. I felt that I had a lot to prove at the time, but I also felt that the environment stifled my creativity and I was just going through the motions.

I knew very quickly that I had no desire to climb the corporate ladder. I believe that time is our most valuable asset, and should be spent doing the things that we love. Mark Twain once said, “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Looking back now, I believe that if I had not worked in that corporate environment, I probably wouldn’t have found the courage to go after my dreams. Making that decision, gave me freedom, clarity and most importantly, I found true happiness.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

The knowledge of a God who loves me so much, and has given me the tools to create my destiny. Because of this confidence I have, external expectations, fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of the power I know is working in me and for me. It’s unconditional love!

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

The desire to leave a legacy that will inspire many generations to come.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Nothing at all.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

One of my favourite quotes from Joseph Campbell , “Follow your bliss….”. Meaning, do only things that make you happy. And contrary to popular belief, the path to your desires is meant to be easy, because it’s who you are to your core. When you get on the path, things will fall into place and opportunities will come.

 

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica -Nigeria’s broadcaster,Tushbee the Tori Goddess……

Divine O James, fondly called Tushbee the Tori goddess is set to take the world by storm. She is a broadcaster, career speaker,compere, model and a humanitarian that cares for widows!

Born and bred in Port Harcourt, River State into the family of James Ikrechero, her broadcasting career initialized in 2012 with Treasure FM, Port Harcourt, a radio Nigeria subsidiary.

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She relocated to Lagos in 2015 to pursue her career. She worked for Eko FM, the official radio broadcaster of Lagos, Brands on Tv, Happenings, and Emplugmedia.

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She founded the organisation “Tushbee and the widows”, singlehandedly and wholeheatedly, taking on the task to care for widows.

“Tushbee and the widows”, was inspired out of love for my late grandmother. She was a widow. She use to share her stories with me after my grandfather passed on. I cared so much for when she was alive. After her death,  I decided to extend the same love and care to as many widows as possible

She love the arts, she loves nature….

Recently she interviewed Femi Odugbemi, Africa’s documentary king!

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 I love to explore and i love to try out new and serious tasks

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Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica “Tushbee the Tori Goddess”

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My passion drives me to climax. I love broadcasting. Radio to be precise. I am so committed to it. Radio is my better half.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was watching television when I was ten years old. I saw Aisha Bello of NTA Nigeria, taking the 9 pm news. There and then I fell in love with her and her profession, and I said to myself ……I will be a broadcaster.


What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

My audience…… my audience appeals to me the most 

What drove you to make money from your passions?

I was driven by living and loving what I do. Pay comes when the time is right and you keep your passion.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
 

It was in the year 2003

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?


My late mother, Mrs. Ozioma Blessing James, kept me going. There was a time I lost focus and vision, but my late mother pushed me so hard. Even when I failed, she guided my path and said :

‘This is not where you supposed to be, keep moving’

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 My late grandmother, Mrs. Grace Ihauku Azuonye Ndimele, she was and still is my motivating factor for success.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?


They should keep doubting!

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?
Well, they should discover what they are in love with and love it with all their heart. They should be committed to what they love. Volunteer to work for free, build integrity around passion. Money will come…
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#CreatePreneurAfrica, Tanzania Rhythm with Saxophonist Zephania Malembela

In his early childhood, he actively engaged in a school band playing Ndulilu, (a local flute). In later teen years he initiated playing the keyboard and joined in the church choir.

He tuned his destiny into a melodious pathway when he laid his hands on a harmonious discovery.....an abandoned saxophone that collected dust in a church.........

Welcome to the world of Zaphania Melembela, a saxophonist from the shores of East Africa, Tanzania.
Rooted in a musical family of love from the Sukuma ethnic group , where traditional music is a key component of every social activity, Zephaniah completed high school and relocated to Dar-es-Salaam to pursue a new chapter of higher education.
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Education curriculums did not usually include any formal music lessons. In 2009 he enrolled at the Dar-Es-Salaam Institute of Technology and successfully completed his studies in Science and laboratory Technology in 2013.
The Institute of Technology was not a waste of time, it was strategic articulation to secure a day job and finance formal music lessons from beginner to advanced levels. The studies in technology became a great back up.
 |||A career in music was something that no parent in Tanzania would wish his/her child to pursue at the time|||
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He never swayed from his passion for music, even though he had no formal music training.
The year 2012 marked an eventful turnaround year for Zephania. He met a friend from Nigeria who had a book on saxophones….and then there was a church with a forgotten saxophone that nobody bothered to learn playing.
A year of self-teaching continued with little progress. Then in October 2013, he met Frank Masamba , the famous composer and saxophonist since the 1980”s
Frank just returned from Mombasa(Kenya, where he worked as a hotel entertainer.
Zephania gained key insight into saxophone techniques and learned the foundation of African music.
This continued till 2014. He continued as a church musician and started exploring beyond church walls, engaging in music with other bands that were not in religious contexts. He also performed as a solo saxophonist at social functions.
In 2015 his formal music training continued when he engaged in music lessons with Innocent Mkuyuli, a pianist and music educator at the International School of Tanganyika.
His journey continued in music theory and practical musicianship on the tenor saxophone as a principal instrument, he continues with advancing to this present day.
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Zephania has worked with bands like the Swahili Blues Band and performed at the Sauti Busara music festival in Zanzibar. He toured internationally with the band and performed with the King of Ethiojazz Mulatu Astatke at the African Jazz Village in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 2015.
He has also accompanied a Jazz Music legend Tu Nokwe from South Africa during the Bagamoyo International Festival of Arts and Culture in 2015.
The music industry in Tanzania has evolved into much more opportunities for a committed musician to lead a successful career in music.

There is a calling for more instrumental and  music teachers are more performers.Technology  paves a way for artists to explore global markets in the music industry. Things have changed for the better.

Saxophonist Zephania Malembela
He has been featured in many albums by other artists both on religious and non-religious music arenas in Tanzania and outside Tanzania. He has been acclaimed by listeners and fans to have a rich tone with a special articulation on his instrument.
Currently, he is a member of the Pentanote Trio working with a renowned jazz pianist Barikeyz Mmbaga and his young brother John Mmbaga, a drummer.
 
He is working on his first solo instrumental album which focuses on a fusion of native music with western and jazz tastes. The album will be released soon.
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 Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica , Zephania Melembela

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
What drives me is love. I am a product of love, love from the creator, love from my parents and from the society around me. All the love I received and continue to receive has taught me to value an adventure of becoming a good person and to love every human being by giving my best out of talents and potentials which are invested inside me, music being a major part of me.
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How did you find your passion and how old were you? 
The passion has always been with me from the beginning. I come from a musical family, a family that for many generations has taken a leading role of music in its society. My mother, being the nearest of all other family members became my inspiration as she would sing, compose and teach song to a local church choir and she even played guitars very well.
At an age of 13 years I joined the choir she was leading and I started learning to play the keyboard and she was my first music teacher even though she had no formal music classes. She knew how chords were supposed to sound though she didn’t know how to play the keyboard.
We would search and combine the sounds of the keyboard to match the guitar chords that she made on the guitar. That is how it started and the rest is history.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
To be relevant to my world by doing the things that complement my talents and potential endowed inside me. Music being among them. To make life a meaningful adventure for me, my family and every other people I can get into contact whether physically or through other media like this.
 What drove you to make money from your passion?
I believe that someone doing his/her passion and being rewarded financially, for it is a sure way of growing the passion to its ultimate potential. This is what drives me to make money from my passion. My passion has to sustain me and to make my family’s life progressive in all spheres that need progress. This is how commitment to passion intensifies. It doesn’t make sense doing your passion with all efforts and then expect to sustain your own life with something else. This will only kill talents and potential and the passion itself altogether.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
It was when I was 22 years old. I had my first payment as a church musician for a church which was just being inaugurated. Later I have been able to extend my horizon beyond the four walls of the church to non-religious arenas musically.
As I said, money is just a reward. I am committed to my passion beyond monetary expectations. Making money is not a goal but money reward facilitates me to achieve the goals.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up? 
No! Giving up? How can someone give up on being themselves? If someone gives up on becoming themselves then who do they want to become as a result? My passion (Music) is who I am, I have never tried to think of giving up because it is like betraying myself and trying to become someone else.
Yes, there have been challenges in the journey and they are still coming even now but I try as much to solve them. It is in solving these challenge progress realizes. I solve my challenges and try to seek other people’s help when things get beyond my capacity. I enjoy working in teams that way.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 
To live an authentic life, to be who I am and to unleash my full potentials as a human being. Success is a process and not a destination. When I wind up my day being better than the previous day musically then I am successful and this continues that way to me, trying to improve myself more every day.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 
Doubt is a source of wisdom. For me, being doubted brought positive results. It created to me an avenue to question my inner man and to make a decision based on who I really am and what I am supposed to do with the gift of life I have been blessed with. Though their doubts I was able to find myself.
I will always listen to their doubts about me and I will then keep perfecting myself in order to become my best.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 
My advice to them is; Look for that reason, that special purpose, that mission you were created for and then build a beautiful life for yourself and those you love around that reason.
Listen to your inner man and be true to yourself. This will lead you to living your authentic life. It is the best reward that you can do to yourself. Be determined, be dedicated, be disciplined and be willing to sacrifice for that reason. All the rest will fall in their positions. You deserve to be happy, this is the cost of becoming one.

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Nigeria’s Lieutenenant Alexander Emmanuel Ochogwu

 

Welcome to the world of an academic, teacher, lover of arts and author, Alexander Emmanuel Ochogwu, ready to embrace a world of peace!

 

 

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Air Force Flight Lieutenant
Strategist
Poet and Writer
Expert in Peace, Security and Conflict Studies

 

His debut  “Diary of a Boy Soldier”, a historical fiction, is a first-hand literary revelation that chronicles everyday realms in the dynamic life and times of being a student at the Nigerian Military school

The unique storytelling journeys through adventures, thrills, and suffering encapsulated in the diaspora of life experiences at a military school in West Africa.

 

 

 “Omo” made the list of Daily Trust Newspaper ‘Most Anticipated Book of 2018’, amongst other pre-published recognitions. 

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I like music, musing, surfing, traveling, solitude and locked up in God’s Presence.I am focused, with an eye for excellence. I believe in me.I can CHANGE the WORLD  : Alexander Emmanual Ochogwu

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica,Alexander Emmanual Ochogwu Air Force Flight Lieutenant

Tell us what drives you?

The realisation that life is ephemeral and the value we add along our journey through this path is what matters.

What is your true passion in life?

To invest my personality by way of mentorship and artistic expressions, on others as much as I can so as to make the world around me better than I met it.

How did you find you passion and how old were you?

Finding my passion was accidental. I was barely twelve when I realised I had elements of creative writing skill. My classmates back at Nigerian Military School Zaria (A military secondary school in Nigeria) had rewarded me with gifts whenever I wrote love letters or constructed persuasive letters on their behalf, to their parents.

Knowing I was sought after gave me the validation that I had this skill inside me. Subsequently, I became intentional about it  – did more studies about the art and began building my vocabulary library, as we used to call it back then.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The understanding that through writing and mentorship I can impart lives.

What drove you to make money from your passion?

Money is good, yeah. However, for me, money comes second place after my passion, which is to add value to my world. With my understanding that when one meets a need, reward follows, meeting a need is my drive. Money naturally comes as the reward.

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When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

As an amateur writer in secondary school, I had received gifts and cash tokens as appreciation for the work I did.

But since I took up writing professionally, I started getting paid for my work in 2005 when I wrote my debut novella, The Diary of a Boy Soldier.

What kept you going when you were about giving up?

The biggest challenge I had was that of external validation until I discovered that I had my own unique voice and had to stick with it. So I resolved within myself that I have a special skill that requires no further validation for me to operate within the space of my belief. This decision got me over the waves of discouragement and discontentment.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

The realization that knowledge is inexhaustible and as such, the need to continually improve myself through learning from others so that I can give back to my downlines.

What do you have to say to all those who doubted you?

For all those who doubted me, I am grateful to them for making me excel above their doubts. They made me work harder and redefined myself to what I have become today, the very thing they had wanted to prevent me from becoming. They were a catalyst to this success story.

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

As a creative, you must be ruthless with your passion. You must be open to learning and abreast of trends in your area of interest. The world is not friendly enough to accept you with ease. So you must be up-to-date, proficient and competitive in the marketplace.

Strive to break through, create your own unique voice, and shout until you are heard. Additionally, you must identify what your true motivation is, and when you find it, nothing can deter you from achieving it.

Your true motivation should not be money. Otherwise, you may give up when money fails to show up as planned.

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#CreatepreneurAfrica, Liberia’s Patrice Juah – “A Gem of Unimaginable Proportions”

“She is a Poet”

“She is a Writer ”  

She is a  Presenter 

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Patrice Juah is on a mission, a soul mission. A universal calling to support young women leaders. A Mandela Washington fellow of (YALI), President Obama's Young African Leaders Initiative ,Patrice Juah is dedicated to shine the light on marvels of Liberia.

 

  She is the crown of

#CreatePreneurAfrica  !   

 

 

 

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A poetic narrative documentary ‘LONESTAR Gem of Unimaginable Proportions is currently in development based on the publication #UnderDucorSkies”

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica, Patrice Juah: The shining light of Liberia

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Patrice Juah
Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I’m driven by creativity, purposeful living, my love for my country and continent, and the desire to make a difference.

My true passion in life is to use the many gifts I’ve been blessed with, to impact lives, and leave behind an inspiring legacy for generations after me.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I found my passion at a very young age. As a child, I always enjoyed writing, public speaking and engaging with my community, hence my choosing to study Broadcast Journalism, and continuing to write today.

I spoke before an audience for the first time when I was about three years old and made my broadcasting debut at age 13 or 14. I also started writing at a very young age and won a national poetry competition when I was 16 years old.

Those two passions helped set the tone for the work I currently do.
And although there were times, when I somewhat deviated from them, I always found my way back.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me the most about my passion is how writing, speaking, and all my other talents enable me to connect, inspire and share my experiences with people.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

I’m currently investing in my passion and making some money along the way. Earning money from my passions enables me to sustain them, and encourages me to keep pursuing my purpose. I’m consumed by my passion, and doing other things always felt draining.

As the saying goes “If you do what you love, you never have to work a day in your life.” Hence, I seek to disrupt the “struggling artist” narrative and inspire creatives to know that we too can lead financially successful and fulfilling lives.

The journey is long and arduous, but with building and investing in my projects consistently, the fruits will be remarkable someday.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

During my freshman year in college. It was an exhilarating experience. When I was younger, people would always tell me that the path I’d chosen would lead to a broke life; that writers, journalists and creatives, don’t make money. Doing my first commercial for a major GSM company and getting paid for it was reassuring.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Giving up has never been an option for me. I stop, rest, or even cry, but the thought of giving up never crosses my mind. When I experience challenges, my faith in God, passion for what I do, support from my family and loved ones always keep me going.

Having a solid support system and people who believe in me, is empowering. Also, seeing the impact we’ve had on the girls we work with, through our educational initiatives (Martha Juah Educational Foundation and Sexy Like A Book), drives me to keep pushing.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I believe many people’s destinies are tied to mine, so if I succeed, they too will. If I fail, they will as well. In order to amplify my work and help my people and country, being successful is paramount.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I’m so focused on my own journey to care about doubters; they’re all distractions. If I’d say anything at all, it’d be to focus their energies on their own lives and work on elevating themselves.

What advice do you give to an aspiring creatives who looks up to you?

Be authentic, bold, and convicted in pursuit of your passions. Follow them wholeheartedly and tune out distractions along the stairway to your dreams

 

“I aim to stand by organizations in their quest to enlighten women on pertinent everyday issues like teenage pregnancies HIV/AIDs, education and development in the workforce”

 

Welcome To Africa. #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

More about Patrice!

  • Founder and Creative Director of Moie, a social enterprise media platform specializing in public relations, content development, events planning and retail management.’

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  • A columnist for  UK’s Vital Woman Magazine’s, Girl Empowerment section, her writings have featured on PBS news hour, African feminist forum, Liberian observer  “Conversations on Liberia”  as well as  the “Sea Breeze Journal of Contemporary Liberian Writings.”

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The Pan African conquest of solidarity reached a solid impact for Patrice when she met  Rosie Motene, South African founder of the Waka agency, at an audition of 'Tinsel' in Ghana. She signed up for the audition.

Although she did not make the cut, the impression left was an empowering journey that led to her immediately taken onto the Waka Agency database of exceptional talent in Africa.

” I feel truly blessed to have crossed paths with Rosie Motene. She’s an exceptional woman and a true gift to Africa and the world”

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  • UNFPA invited her to present her poem” Fitsula, “I Have Conquered You” in 2013. It was written to honor the survivors of Fistula at the 1st International Day to End Obstetric Fistula.
  • Patrice is the founder and chairperson of the Miss Education Africa Pageant, Africa’s first Pan-African education pageant, which promotes and advocates for girls’ education on the continent.
  • She’s the founder and editor of “Sexy Like A Book”, an academic initiative designed to inspire young women and girls to improve their perspective on reading, literacy, and education.

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  • She’s a regular contributor to the United Nations’ Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) radio, now ECOWAS Radio show, Girl Power, that promotes self-esteem, confidence, and the importance of leadership in local communities.
  • She’s a member of UN Women’s Civil Society Advisory Group on Liberia and sits on the board of the Liberia Literary Society.
  • She recently served as a keynote speaker at the 2016 Global Entrepreneurship Week in Geneva, Switzerland as a guest of the U.S government.
  • She founded the Martha Juah Educational Foundation, named in honor of her mother, a retired primary school teacher of  50 years, to advocate for scholarships for young girls in rural Liberia.

Patrice holds a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications and Political Science, an advanced certificate in Fashion Design, and a Certificate in Business & Entrepreneurship.

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  • She was invited by former U.S FirstLady, Michelle Obama, in July 2014, for a roundtable discussion on Girls’ Education in Africa, and served as an advisory committee member for the 2015 African Creative Economy Conference, held in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

During the West African Ebola outbreak, she launched the “Ebola Is Not My Identity” campaign along with other artists to combat the problem of stigmatization.

“The goal of the campaign was to showcase creative works of art that reflected hope for Liberia on her path to recovery, other than the images of despair shown on the news wires at the time.”

In 2015, she was featured in Amina Magazine, as one of the new female faces of the African Creative Economy, and was also spotlighted by Brand Woman Africa in the same year as one of the women whose efforts are positively changing Africa one community at a time.

“This young, driven and vivacious woman believes that for Africa to succeed, Africans must make education a powerful driver and the strongest instrument in the reduction of poverty, improving health, gender equality, peace and stability.”

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#CreatepreneurAfrica- ‘Afrodazzled’ Kenyan Artist Cyrus Kabiru- “C-Stunner Spectacular Spectacles”

Trashy Business- Give trash a second Chance .

Cyrus Kabiru

Electronic refuse dumps in the Nairobi, the capital of Kenya was a stepping stone for Cyrus Kabiru as he gave dumped materials new life.

 

His creative pathways embody soul playfulness and inspire the  Nairobi youth and creatives alike.

C. Kabiru

 

He steps in various aspects of art, between sculpture, performance, and fashion.

His gallery has sculptures, glasses and humorous canvassed painting portrayals of contemporary life in Kenya. Bottle caps are sewn together depicting African nature.

 

Artwork beyond the regular , his life journey is embodied in the prosthetic knowledge gallery.

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His obsession with eyewear all started when his father refused to get him ordinary spectacles, so he created his own special twist in eyewear. He turns spectacles into various forms that enter a new realm of creativity into the beyond

My spectacles draw curiosity and attention . It therapeutical in a sense!

 

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#CreatepreneurAfrica Spectacular Inventor Cyrus Kabiru

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
 My passion….. My passion is my creation. My passion is my art.
How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

A young age, I forget how young I was. I just know my dad inspired me. He did not like the ordinary in anything! even refused to get me glasses I desired, so I created them!

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
Art defines me. If there was no art there would me know me.I would feel like I live a soulless life.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
What drove me? It kind of came naturally. People started to buy my art. They started requesting my art and wanting to pay for it.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
 In 2005. My uncle bought from me for $9.
After that, he felt guilty for paying such a low amount and always dashed off when he saw me!
  What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
 I used to give up on a lot of other things in life. Not my art. My work. It’s about treating it as a calling and one can never actually give up what is a natural calling. A life purpose
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 

Every day, Every morning when I wake up, I fell like I must achieve something. I want to raise my art to new heights. I want to soar my art internationally. More so.I do believe it is already there.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 

Doubt me if you need to…..thats your choice ……but not my work. It has been a long journey for me to reach where I am

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 

Just believe in what you are doing, be the best and if you want to move be your unique self. Be what you want to be

Biodiverse Rich Coastal Forest in Tanzania: Pugu Hills

 

Pugu Forest reserve in the Pwani region of Tanzania is adjacent to the Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve.These forests are considered as the oldest in the world!

There is never a shortage of places to go outside of Dar es Salaam that will take at least four hours of driving, besides the beaches, of course…a great privilege for any city.

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A coastal forest reserve situated 20km from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania might not be part of traditional tour routes in Tanzania, yet it attracts a fair number of visits.  Often visited by biologists, it is a  top forest in Africa for bird conservation.

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A 20-minute drive from the Julius Nyerere airport, the main attractions include a sacred cave of the Zaramo people, a cattle market, and fascinating bat caves, the historical remains of Colonial times including a railway tunnel and  Kaolinite industry an off course, the forest.

 

Kaolin deposits of high quality lie below Pugu Hills in the Kisarawe district. These resources are untapped despite a growing demand worldwide. Local and foreign geologists have confirmed Kaolin deposits of  2.3 billion metric tonnes.

Biodiversity richness is high with a wide range of plants, birds, reptiles, insects, and birds.

There are about fourteen known endemic plants, two endemic mammal species, and an endemic subspecies of birds.  Wildlife includes Masaai giraffes, elephants, impalas, warthogs, Tanzanian cheetahs, Africa leopards, spotted hyenas, mongooses, elephant shrews, galagos, civets, side strapped and black back jackals, and over eighty species of birds as well as bat colonies dwelling in the caves.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

Mount Meru: Tanzania cultural tour expeditions- exploring Tengeru

 

Nearby picturesque Mount Meru slopes, the second highest peak in Tanzania, lies Tengeru, 13km from Arusha on the path to Moshi.

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It is simply the best base to explore cultural attractions that make up the rich heritage of the Meru tribe in Tanzania.

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There are farms, banana fields and traditional homesteads on the mountain. This village near Arusha is distinct in character.

The venture is set forth exploring old coffee farms with local production of the world’s popular beverage with and then canoe into a  volcanic lake at Mount Meru foothills, home to the best birdwatching and fishing sites.

Ready to give back to communities around Kilimanjaro? Volunteer programs are on offer at all local schools in the surrounds of Mount Kilimanjaro, venture out and discover development and upliftment projects in the Tengeru Community.

Tengeru Activities

Coffee Tour

One of the major highlights in Tengeru is enjoying special home-brewed coffee with the locals.

The coffee plantations in Tengeru journey leads curiosity ventures into local homes and lessons to prepare coffee. The tour offers specially harvested coffee from the Meru community on volcanic Mout Meru foothills.

Lake Duluti Safari Tours

A close view of vegetation in Tengeru with an abundance of fauna and flora at the lakeside. Learn about mystical Meru legends and mysteries linked to Lake Duluti. Get a front seat view of birds, monkeys, reptiles, many other animals, and plants.

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This tour will give you an up-close view of Tengeru’s vegetation and you will able to admire the abundant lakeside fauna and flora. You can learn about the Meru legends linked to the lake and its mysteries while getting a front-row viewing of the monkeys, birds, reptiles and many other animals whilst learning about our plant life. A magical destination of authentic traditional roots.

Tengeru Market Tour

The colorful community market, interact live and eat amongst the locals. The busiest market days are Wednesdays and Saturday

Conservation programs in Tengeru

Environment programs in a land rich with vegetation. A source of survival. The main issue is deforestation threatening ecology and the community. Participate in environmental programmes and enjoy a luscious waterfalls tour relaxing in nature marvels

Forest Tours at Mount Meru

The second highest mountain in Tanzania m Mount Meru boasts beautiful forests. Unwind and enjoy magnificence. It is a great destination for preparing for Mount Kilimanjaro expeditions

Walk through the forests of Tanzania’s second-highest mountain.

"Mringaringa" Tour

A traditional gathering place, “Mringaringa”. Listen to the wisdom of thrilling Meru culture and traditional dancing. This venue is also used for settling disputes in the community with presiding Meru elders.

Local Food Preparation and Traditional Dances

Soul soothing music and food celebrations with traditional dancing guarantee a worthwhile experience.

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

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Our City of Clay in Africa – Djenne in Mali

 

A UNESCO world heritage site, the ancient town,Djenne in the heart of  Mali,stands on Africa's mighty River Niger. A city of mud houses, streets and city walls. The ochre mud composition gives out an embezzling monochrome look.

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The journey to Djenne is like stepping into another era. Little has changed since its prosperous 14th and 15th-century heydays.

Djenne on the flood lands of the Bani and Niger rivers is about 220 miles south-west of Timbuktu. Before  1591, Djenné became a prosperous center of slave, ivory and gold trade. Known as the oldest city in Sub Sahara Africa,  famous for its Great Mosque and market.

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It was founded around 800AD by merchants and flourished. The meeting place for Sudan desert traders and Guinea tropical forests, it became an impactful trading center and thrived due to its direct river connection with Timbuktu and the head of all trade routes leading to salt and gold mines.

Controlled by empires of Morrocan kings it expanded featuring products from the north and central Africa until the French occupied in in 1893.

Commercial functions were then taken over by Mopti town in the confluence of Bani and Niger rivers, in the northeast,  An agricultural trade center, Djenne boasts Muslim Architecture and a great mosque.

The great mosque built in 1905 is a classic Sahelian mud architecture.

The highlight of each year is an event when annually, the inhabitants of the town gather and refine the mud structure, giving it a new layer to replace what torrential rains fade out. The festival of plastering event: La Fete de crepissage. 

The labors of plasterers are accompanied with a beating of drums. The drums are perched on wooden spikes that stick out of the walls, serving as permanent scaffolding and decoration.

Younger girls carry bowls and buckets  of water and mud from the river bed, and older women pound millet making pancakes,

Special meals are made by each family to celebrate the occasion. Proud of their architectural heritage the people of Djenne have long resisted paved roads and any introduction of electricity.

Only a handful of cars exist in Djenne belonging mostly to government officials that run development programmes for sustainability.

All new buildings and even the hospital are built in traditional style and technique binding the river mus with straw and grass

The building material is plentiful and cheap and the clay keeps houses cool, even with the scorching hot sun outside.

Labor for repairing is becoming a challenge in present day when most move into cities with computers, email, and television.

The architectural gem receives foreign aid to maintain its splendor and keep it the same, for another two decades and more!

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Welcome!  #ExploremotherlandAfrica

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CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

Cape town filmmaker, Kurt Orderson explored artistic expression in his early lifetime beginnings. After mastering crafts of his creations from his backyard in the Cape 'ghettos'(beyond Table Mountain),he ventured out into the world, rising up to becoming one of Africa's leading filmmakers.

Kurt initiated his career during his studies as a trainee at the SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), earning mere stipends for daily living expenses.

He defined his unique aesthetic voice and was soon acknowledged as a director and cinematographer on several key productions.

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He founded his independent production company, “Azania Rizing”.

“Azania Rizing” is a tool for the African diaspora to rise up and map African legacies around the world on a global storytelling platform.

His major works include:

  •  Definition of Freedom, examining the role of  Hip Hop in South Africa. It was screened at the Toronto and Vancouver  hip-hop festival  winning the best documentary award at the Atlanta Hip hop film festival
  •  Tribute to Lucky Dube, the tribute to legendary reggae artist Lucky Dube was filmed in South Africa, London, and Jamaica. It was awarded the Best Documentary  Award at the  Silicon Valley African Film Festival in  2013.
  • The Pan-African Express, a journey of six young men, students from Atlanta who travel to  South Africa and trying to understand people living with  HIV and Aids. The film was funded by The Oprah Winfrey Foundation.
  • Eldorado, a feature chronicles the journey of four friends in a Gauteng township in South Africa. It won the Special mention South Africa Feature film at the  Durban International Film Festival in 2011
  •  Breathe Again,  features Derrick Orderson, a marginalized swimmer from the  Cape Flats who rose above his livelihood in an abnormal society of inhumane prejudice. It was screened at the Encounters film festival and Durban International Film Festival and several film festivals worldwide.
  • The Prodigal Son 
  • Visibly Invisible

“The Unseen Ones”

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds” Bob Marley

Current Projects

Not in My Neighborhood explores spatial violence, current gentrification and the post-apartheid era. It compares Cape Town , Johannesburg and New York uncovering the threads that exist between people that are miles apart.

 

Picture for the documentary Not in my Neighborhood. September 2016 – São Paulo – Brazil

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#CreateoreneurAfrica – The Soul Journey of Kurt Orderson

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is ultimately the great history and achievements of Africa, and I guess also within a broad order global perspective is my people that inspire me and drive me. I am from South Africa, a very specific region in South Africa, Cape Town.

More specifically I am from a township from that is part of a strip of what would be known as the “ghettos”,  the Cape Flats, there is a rich history of storytelling, a great significance of the epicenter of what the foundation of the space, basically built on the legacy of apartheid. The legacy of architectural and apartheid spatial planning ideally separated people  (which was an actual policy with the group areas act ) that had a great significance of breaking up families, literally…… families scattered.

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I think what maintains a traditional oral form of storytelling, obviously remained significant, it inspired my body of work ultimately that’s my drive, Africa’s history, Africa’s achievements. One is inspired by  Africa’s legacy, the epicenter of academia and  Timbuktoo…storytelling and the arts and crafts of storytelling ultimately started there and spread across the globe.

My true passion….well I am very passionate about just listening, sitting and listening to people telling stories, whether happy or sad,  ultimately passion for me personally, is driven by a deep desire of wanting to change the landscape of..change  how people perceive each other. I think it’s those stories of those people who done it in the past and are still doing it, that’s what drives my passion. I am inspired by their passion, I think I apply it to my life.That for me is what passion is. Passion goes deeper, the engine or driving force for one to do something. I think ultimately wanting to do something is ultimately passion…the driving force…

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

How did I find my passion….well that’s an interesting question? I think for me when I finished high school, I was definitely inspired by the visual medium and visual arts. There was obviously the influence of television and Hollywood tv,  I guess, but also my parents influenced me.

My father was a screen printer, which is ultimately a visual artist, although he didn’t call himself that, based on conditioning of the system that shaped him, apartheid South Africa. The idea that you were limited to do certain things when it comes to art black folks were deprived in a large historical moment of what the status quo says what you do and what you can become. My father is a strong reference to creating images and applying it to a t-shirt, applies similarly script to screen.

I think its an interesting analogy, metaphor for making films, taking a rich traditional medium and applying it to my work. I think that is how I found my passion.

How old was I?   I think my first reference to start noticing…I don’t know if I can say noticing, more where I picked up the idea that I was passionate about the visual medium, I think I was maybe thirteen years old or fourteen…..

I was locked out of my parent’s house, of course. That time there were no cellphones. I’m from a family of a family of five kids, my parents both worked, I was locked out one day.  I went to the backyard, my father had a workshop in the back of the yard, and I found a hammer and flat nose screwdriver.

I used the hammer and flat nose to carve out my name on a piece of wood and was quite impressed by myself. Wow, no one before that necessarily initiated anything like that. I wasn’t exposed to artistic expression and multiple forms of what artists do, I carved out my name, varnished it and made it immaculate. Later on meeting people who carved for a profession, creating amazing things. I always reference my first carving, that was my flame of inspiration for being an artist, use a visual medium for storytelling.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What about my passionate appeals to me the most… I guess the privilege to being a filmmaker, that being my passion but also to add to that, I feel very blessed to basically get paid for my passion, for my hobby… I would say …because we love film so much I  will do it for free, that’s how deep our passion for cinema lies…and getting paid to do something you love, your passion is a heavy blessing.

What appeals to me most is the idea of  shared history and shared knowledge, when someone allows you into their household to tell you their stories…. you being inspired and, relating on a level of  “oh I knew someone who had a similar idea about this or that .”

 I think that is what the driving force is …..sharing communal space, sharing narratives, sharing stories,  sharing politics, sharing knowledge….that for me a strong appeal to my passion…

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money out of my passion…well you know in real talk, not to romanticize the question too much. We, unfortunately, live in a very capitalist society, we inherited capitalism,, were born into a capitalistic society…..that on one level, right,, that reality of things, we need to eat right, we need to sustain ourselves… in terms of monetary exchange we apple or tomato,whatever……what well I just realised that my craft, my talent, my blessing, I can get paid for it.

For me, there was a strong driving force around craft, like crafting what is my voice, what is my aesthetic, what does Kurt bring across in a common sharing space as a filmmaker as a storyteller. It was first defining my voice, after defining that idea, that is when I felt to make money.

People  want to hire you, because they want that aesthetic that you ideally represent, that was my passion for making art and getting paid for my art, as an independent filmmaker, as an African filmmaker, things are rough out there…and we want to tell our own stories on our own terms, the system itself makes it very difficult for us to sustain ourselves. I need to work like a plumber who works with tools and I need to buy those tools. That is the reality of things

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

The first time I got paid for something… I can’t recall exactly when that was when that moment was…there was a few moment I think. I think  I worked on a television show and I was a contestant, but I also worked on a show. It was a show on SABC2, I was like 18 or 19.

We were trainees and there was a little  stipend that they paid us for traveling money or whatever. It was for generic work on set like organizing cables and assisting the floor, production. I remember very little , but that’s when I realised you can get paid for this. I was still studying at that time as well.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going. I have come through multiple crossroads moments asking myself is this really sustainable, what I do, filmmaking? Filmmaking is really hard, difficult, expensive artistic form to choose. A painter can get some canvas and some paints  make a  killer piece, get to an art market  for a million and boom there we go

For filmmakers, the reality of getting a camera, getting all the equipment you need, and then on top of it, getting a team to operate the tools, that’s a whole process on its own. These things are hard when you off the grid and not part of the mainstream in the system and don’t necessarily want to be part of it.

That’s a very conscious choice, you can just join tv and become a commissioning editor, produce for television and things will be different, it will be a completely different narrative, everything is there,, there is funding for you and they hire you.

Food, clothes and shelter have no politics.

Mutabaruka

As an independent filmmaker or producer, it is very difficult… I only recently mastered the art form of really raising money for my films, for many years my films were independent, self-funded at times.

Now its like I understand more about the industry, how to write the right proposals, and apply to the right people and getting the money and managing the money.

When you at the lowest moment at the crux, paying rent, paying teams, paying crews, and rejections. Rejection is a big thing for filmmakers , filmmakers are sensitive beings, we are fragile as well  in this…. broken world

These are all the challenges that come on your journey, it applies to life as well… life ain’t easy.  The world is not nice, the world is cruel, the life we find peace and sanity within ourselves, the people close to you. There are your therapists, they are your motivational speakers, they push you and say we believe in you, that’s what keeps me going.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 

What motivates me to be successful, what motivation every day. Whats the motivation?  I think this idea that, on one level is that  African history, African stories were for the longest time ever was told through the voice of the colonizer and the aesthetic and the lens of the colonizer…..

These were told in a biased fashion…for me now, as a fellow African filmmaker, it is our duty. I feel strongly for film to be part of the restoration process, the healing journey that we are experiencing and going through as black people across the globe and the trauma that we collectively experience.

How do we heal? What are the healing mechanisms? Now to be honest with you, we don’t have a clear answer to that question. I feel collective communal sharing through a  very powerful visual medium like television or film, then you can project to the rest of the world and share that and say in order for us to be this idea of one world and one shared history.

Everyone has to have the opportunity to share their stories through there own  POV or point of view,  I think that’s powerful ways of sharing. We all have common stories. We share a common history of people all over the world which ultimately makes us human.

Every generation blames the generation before them.

 

Racial ideas and ideology, culture and religion etcetera, are just all divisive mechanisms put in place for a form divide, rule and conquer….not to be cliched,  we have the same blood and all of that. I have transformed, transgressed that phase. I have passed that idea

Anger is fine. Anger is important. We have to be angry. We can’t all just hear  I am sorry and forgive right now,

What if I don’t want to forgive you right, now, and maybe  I want to make a film about that as part of the idea of forgiveness, as collective forgiveness.

That makes film become an interesting mechanism and medium, for multiple purposes. I feel,  personally, we can use film a methodology of social healing for healing the self and healing communities.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

What I have to say about all the people who doubted me…interesting question.  I always think about, one person comes to mind, a schoolteacher.

I wasn’t necessarily the greatest student, to be honest in high school.  I  probably could have done more. I was like, reckless and mischievous. I would say, I gave a lot of trouble.

Was I a rebel? Not sure, I don’t want to throw those words around. One teacher just didn’t like me. I was thinking about her the other day,

I think you always doubted me, I don’t think you ever believed in me, and now that my work is out there in the mainstream? I wonder if she saw my name out there. I wonder what she would think, after seeing what I had done.

I don’t want to reference people that doubted me.  I am not going to make a film for people. I make films am driven to or inspired to make. I don’t care about whether people agree with my standpoint, I love those who love me on the real level, beyond blood, blood relatives. My family is universal.  I am very blessed. We share this brokenness.As a broken people, we come together and we form this path of healing, the heal of our wounds….

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

What advice do I give to those aspiring creatives that look up to me?

The advice ideally would be to always use motivation. The idea of keeping it moving or just do it.  Life is about the idea of inspiring the other, inspiring other people. I think for me,  that is what life is about. Me inspiring other people and continuing the human change of inspiration.

One has to know your craft, know your blessing, identify your blessing.  But also knowing that this is a  very complicated world that we living in. There will be multiple stumbling blocks with a lot of us.  You carrying the torch, you carrying the great torch of your ancestors. You dont have a choice  , you have to keep that torch alight. That is the flame, the driving force, the fuel.

More important is to have a voice. Have a political voice. I don’t mean party politics.  Having a geopolitical view of the world and its complexities. An understanding of global politics. Deciphering the bullshit of what the news tells you, projecting that in your work. Be that change you ultimately want to see.

What you see is what you see. What you know is different

Mutabaruka

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Slavery is not African history. Slavery interrupted African history.

Mutabaruka

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

My venture continued. The final touches took an extraordinary connection – The Journey of my soul. My conversations with Tu Nokwe sparkled the final touches of #CreatepreneurAfrica.

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An excerpt from the “Publication of the Millenium”, #Createpreneur Africa: Tu Nokwe- ‘The Light of Africa’

Meet our CreatePreneur™,Tu Nokwe,a legendary musician all the way from South Africa. 

Born and raised during the mainstream helms of the detrimental apartheid era into an artistic family that chose to soar above the pressing system and created Amajika.

This was a youth and child development arts organization to boost self-esteem and counteract the collating mental abuse that shattered mass populations emotionally.

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We explore her breathtaking lifestyle, delving into the roots of soul inspiration as we explore her pathways, sharing her journey of self-discovery on a road of survival.

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Tu Nokwe,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
My passion.My passion.Where do I start? We could end up with episodes of my true passions as they flow into so many channels. Well as you know, my outlet of expression is the creation of sounds and soothing soul rhythms, pulsating heartbeats in blissful melodies.

“I am creative, I am physical, and I am mental. I am emotional, but most of all I am a spiritual being having a human experience. That is just the beginning of the “Journey of My Soul”

How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I think I was born into it and grew up thriving in the presence all around me. My inner drive & determination fuelled me to learn to play the guitar without a guitar in my hands, but two chairs strung with wool from one chair to the other;using an old guitar tutor to position the fingers in cord formations and coordination. 

My career started when I was eighteen months old! In a commercial for a soap brand. I come from a family of musicians rooted in historical ingenuity of memorable creations.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
It is an outlet of soul expression. I explore the mantra

‘Order creates comfort’. Creative self-management is the core of my spirit as I share and display self-management tools leaving those around me invigorated with a soul-filled purpose.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
The gift of abundance is an asset, allowing open doors to explore. Positive affirmations to call on wealth is a stepping-stone to encounter all barriers in the most lucid times and delve into ‘The Light of Africa’, beaming promise of abundance. 

Africa is rooted in wealth despite the world image of poverty-stricken and downtrodden bereavement that is propagated and installed in the mass media. We are born on the soil rooted in wealth and treasures beyond human imagination. It is ours.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Every engagement was abundant on spiritual rewards. My first performance that brought in a cash flow was at the age of 18 at a wedding with the ‘Black Angels’, a local band. And then when I turned 13  at the annual jazz festival 'Milk Africa'(with the “Black Angels” - the Sneddon Theatre at the University of Natal in Kwa-Zulu Natal & the epic movie 'Shaka Zulu'. When I was 18, I earned a living doing African braids at a hair salon.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I launched the first African Diary - Journey of my Soul” over eight years. Initially it was my supportive tool for self-management. 

The project sparked off out of a concerned calling out from the lack of purpose and low self-esteem that brewed on a daily basis. My resilience to counteract all obstacles, keep focus and having my effective presence engraved in all souls I touched with my talent. I never gave up; I knew there were many doors open amongst the few that closed before me.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My mantra I never cease to chant is ‘Order creates comfort. I am a spiritual being and give thanks each day for all my blessings. The campus for my state of being is joy & happiness. Not everything may come to you at the time you desire it to. However, in Gods time, what is meant to be will be.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
All I can say to those who doubted me is advise them to rise above their fears and soar at rising heights. We all need somebody to lean on.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
“Journey of my Soul” was initially used by uprising performing artists in Amajika Youth and children arts under the auspices of the Nokwe Creative development foundation founded by my family. 

During 1976 when there was a need to boost, self esteem in the helm of the grueling apartheid System in my country. It became clear that as an artist my purpose was to devote time and energy to empower the children of Africa. 

I discovered that self-work had to begin with me. Once I had a holistic understanding of myself, I could reach out to others. My advice to aspiring creative’s is journey to define you and rediscover your LIFE purpose. If you follow my life story, my hope is that you will explore exercises and concepts to develop who you are. I wish you all the best with the ‘Journey of your Soul’

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

CreatePreneurAfrica@Cleng’a Ng’atigwa- Animation and traditional music in Tanzania

 

 

“Our seeds of creativity sprout out into roots that branch out into a world of knowledge, wisdom, and inspiration”. Cleng’a Ng’atigwa

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Cleng’a Ng’atigwa, co-founder of leading animation kids series Ubongo kids and founder of JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAl,  is taking on the world by storm.

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
What drives me is to see positive changes and upliftment of lives around me. I believe my purpose in life is to instill a readiness for our new generation.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
My mum seeded my passion. I observed her praying for women and children in my childhood. Our task was to fetch water for elder women and assist them.
My mum was a positive inspiration to all around her.  When I was about eight years old, she sang to us and tell us folk tales. Every story had a linked song.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
My passion is my ultimate happiness. I get to meet new interesting people. I am naturally a creator of concepts. I create concepts that help others to learn and grow.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money is the greatest challenge I face. It took a long time for my creativity to eventually become an income stream. My focus has always been primarily on creativity.

It took a long to raise income through my passion because my thoughts were based on creativity rather than making money through it, that is a big challenge that I face.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Payments come in various forms. Some are indirect. Some are rewards of appreciation with low incentives. The first time I was paid a regular income was when I initiated a concept that became a huge success, Ubongo kids.
Mama Ndege
As co-founder of the animation project, Ubongokids, an educative cartoon series, I stepped into various roles. I was the art director, the main character, "Mama Ndege", was my conceptualization,and I played the character voiceover. 

I composed the main theme song "hisabati" and so many other songs for the seriess.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The quality of my services. Seeing the satisfaction my work creates for others around me. My biggest challenge is raising capital.

What keeps me going is motivating others and getting the support and motivation I need to go on. Stand by me and I stand by you.

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Special guests like the legendary Tu Nokwe, all the way from South Africa endorsed the initiative and was our guest of honor at the JUU Afrikan festival in 2017.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I know success. I have seen the success of mere ideas becoming lifelong projects that triumph and uplift many. Knowing that makes me keep on going and striving to reach my goals.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I just wish them all the best and pray that they reach their goals and keep inspired. Those that condemn you do so just to uplift themselves when obstacles come in the way of their dreams
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
The journey of being a creative is no easy path ahead. Strive to do what incites your passion and you will reach you the pathway laid before you.

Welcome #exploremotherlandAfrica

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#CreatePreneurAfrica-Andrea Dondolo, Queen Spirit Shining Light in South Africa

‘Rise above circumstances and become a beacon of hope…….

Nomasebe Andrea Dondolo

How did it all begin? The journey on the beacon of hope pathway?
It was a calling.........a calling for South Africa. The need for patriots to nurture, uphold and defend the honor of our country, of our continent, through our actions and our beliefs.

 

 

 

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Welcome to the world of Andrea Dondolo!

 

Spirit of a Queen – The rise of Andrea Dondolo

Award-winning actress from Eastern Cape, Andre Dondolo is a writer, a cultural activist,  a community leader, a storyteller, a Ímbongi (Xhosa praise singer), a talented bead crafter and a businesswoman.

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She runs “Calabash Storyteller” a township talent agency and her own clothing line. Her other activities are storytelling workshops for children and adults.

Calabash Storytellers is an NPO focused on creating dialogue through the arts, culture, and heritage. Township Talent is a business based on innovation design

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Her early studies in human rights at the University if the WesternCape and a drama diploma with the “New Africa Theatre Association”, led her into professional productions like “Romeo and Juliet” and “Dancing 2 patterns” at the Cape Baxter Theatre.

She has featured in international feature films, “The Final Solution” as well as “The Piano Player.” A household name, South Africa television has her featured in multiple shows.

Createpreneur Africa- Andrea Dondolo

Tell us what drives you?
The need to live a purpose driven life rather than just existing knowing that after each fall you must get up and get going bruises and all are just your own scars.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
Wow, I believe it always been there, all it took was alignment and opportunity so I guess as soon as I could reason and manage the conversation with my mind, heart and soul, I nailed it, To be exact, I guess at around 25.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The adrenaline and fear that fuels appeal to me.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money makes the world go round, if you make it while you doing what you love, you've nailed it.
When was the first time you got paid for your passion?
In the year 1999, it was a theatre show called "The Good heart" at Baxter theatre while finalizing my studies at New Africa Theatre Association.
What kept you going when you thought you were giving up?
My son and competitive spirit.
What motivates you every day to be more successful?
My son.
What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?
Well  my life is exactly that, my own, live yours and prosper, by the way, no one died and put you in charge of my life, live yours.
What advice do you give creatives who look up to you?
Just run your race and keep your focus on the ball......

 

 

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica. Soul words of wisdom, CreatepreneurAfrica

3 Island Escape Getaways in East Africa

Whether you’re looking for giant coconuts or giant tortoises,lush rainforests or cool highlands, wildlife or glowing coral reefs and crossroads cuisine, there is an island in East Africa to suit your taste and budget.

The East coast of Africa is blessed with stunning islands and warm Indian Ocean waters.

Some are sovereign nations, others are unknown secret destinies harboring fantastic natural and cultural treasures.

The palm-lined beaches and luxury resorts are only one aspect of the marvels East Africa island getaways in on the Indian Ocean can offer. There is much more than glossy travel brochures put out. The diverse island explorers and spice merchants have shaped the essence. Africa’s ocean-themed adventures have loads to offer travelers.

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The ‘Melting Pot’ of  East Africa Islands

The complicated history of the culturally rich islands of East Africa comes from the strategic bases that they were for over 1000 years.

They served as trade routes between Europe, Arabian Peninsula, and the Indian subcontinent.

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Omani traders and Portuguese sailors, merchants and colonials…. , all gravitated to farm sugar cane and spices, trading gold, ivory, and slaves.

This is evident in the 15th century Swahili Lamu ruins, the Shirazi heritage of Zanzibar and historical plantation homes. We see it in Creole cuisine in Mauritius.

The oldest settlement in Kenya is Lamu and shares much with Stonetown in Zanzibar.The muli stories of townhouses with balconies shading the narrow lanes filled with soul-inspired vendors selling delicacies, arts, and crafts in silver and wood.

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1. Zanzibar

Tanzania has many adventurous crusades,from beaches, ruins, wildlif,the Mt Kilimanjaro summit and the island of Zanzibar

The age-old living traditions in Zanzibar are a soul rewarding experience.

 

 

Families in Zanzibar gather to snack and promenade in Forodhani Gardens during celebrations and special festive day.

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Island Beach bumming and Diving Ventures

Budget-friendly diving on Zanzibar and Pemba offer rewarding dives. Accommodation is suited to budget travelers as well. Good quality in abundance is what you get in Nungwi, Kendwa,  Jambiani, and Paje. Public transport is easy to reach, along streets with delicious, plentiful food.

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2. Comoros

Between Madagascar and Mozambique, the Comoros Archipelago has four islands in total. The three main ones that gained independence in 1975 are Grand Canmore, Anjouan, and Mohéli. The fourth one, Mayotte, is still under French rule.

Comoros Islands, a population descended from Malay, African and Arab immigrants.

The culture of Comoros is shaped by Portuguese explorers, Arab traders from Persia and Portugal as well as the French colonizers in the19th century.

An active East Africa volcano is located at the Grande Comore.It erupted in the year 2005 creating a desert landscape offset by turquoise seas and white beaches.

Mohéli island is a major turtle nesting site in East Africa, where you are guaranteed to view turtles.

To escape crowds an experience life at a slow pace plan a getaway to Comoros islands. There are pristine beaches, lush rainforests and beautiful reefs with a fascinating blend of Swahili and Arab culture.

3.Mauritius

The Mauritius archipelago comprises of

  • Mauritius
  • Rodrigues
  • Agaléga
  • St. Brandon.

Two other territories, Tromelin Island and the Chagos Archipelago  are claimed by Mauritius but disputes by Uk and France(1)

Mauritius, a world-class destination combines influences from Africa and Europe. It is famous for beach resorts with amazing coastal shores.

Scuba diving and deep-sea fishing are popular activities. The  forests on the island  provide habitat for the  endemic bird, plant and mammal species

With sophisticated cuisine, nightlife and fishing villages, Mauritius caters for every taste.

4.Seychelles

 

Seychelles is made up of 115 paradise islands it has a small population, is uncrowded.

The idyllic beaches, aquamarine waters offering excellent snorkeling and diving are tourist drawcards.

Rare wildlife range from pelagic seabirds to giant tortoises. The cuisine in Seychelles has a taste from Africa,  a tinge of Asian sensation topped with European settler influences.

The luxury resorts in Seychelles, make it famous for couples on honeymoon.

5. Madagascar

Madagascar located off the Mozambique coast is the fourth largest island in the world.  Boasting unique, fauna and flora, 90 % of the wildlife in Madagascar will not be found anywhere else.

 

 

The most famous are Lemurs.

The lush rainforests, giant baobabs, limestone karsts and isolated islets are a calling for visitors. Activities range from scuba diving to deep-sea fishing and hiking to whale-watching.

Welcome to the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar, an eco-tourism destination of note for all discerning explorers of world wonders. Dramatic peaks, primordial forests, stony deserts and extinct volcanoes.

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Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

The other side of Table Mountain – Cape Town


Planning to travel in Africa?  The magnificent Table Mountain is a drawing card and the starting point is the infamous Cape Town for most… today we look over and behind Table Mountain.
Table Mountain

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The perks of traveling to Africa are endless. Instead of scanning the game parks for rhino or setting off for a day sampling Cape chardonnays, take a  look at the other side.

The townships of Cape Town….. You inhale the roots of freedom, exhaling air of human rights, justice, and reconciliation. A flow from shebeens to sangomas, the emotional sensory vibe sets you sparkling off with a vivid social culture. Nothing is amiss as every township bubbles with its own unique story about its struggles and how it evolved and revolved to its current state.

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A treasure in the center of Cape Town – Bo-Kaap

Bo-Kaap

Beyond the hustles and bustles, just beyond the city of Cape Town, you find Bo-Kaap.

The “Bo Kaap” is one of the most interesting parts of Cape Town culturally and historically. Colorful houses, steep cobbled streets, the muezzin’s calls to prayer, and children traditionally dressed for Madrassa add to this unique Cape experience. It is a multicultural area, tucked into the fold of signal hill. Use the cobblestoned streets as your guide and you will be lead into a lively suburb filled with brightly colored houses from the nineteenth and seventeenth century, shrines of Muslim saints, an abundance of beautiful Mosques, and the very first mosque that existed in South Africa.

Use the cobblestoned streets as you are lead into a lively suburb filled with brightly colored houses from the nineteenth and seventeenth century, shrines of Muslim saints, an abundance of beautiful Mosques, and the very first mosque that existed in South Africa.

The residents of Bo-Kaap are mostly descended from slaves who were imported to the Cape by the Dutch during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. They came from Africa, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, and Java Malaysia. Some of them were political exiles and convicts. They were known as “Cape Malays”, which is incorrect as most of Bo-Kaap’s residents are not entirely of Malaysian descent. Their many Indonesian traces of vocabulary in the dialect of Cape, for example, “trim-

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They were known as “Cape Malays”, which is incorrect as most of BoKaap’s residents are not entirely of Malaysian descent. Their many Indonesian traces of vocabulary in the dialect of Cape, for example, “trim-makaasi” thank-you, as well as  “kanalah” please! There are also many words, which have also been substituted with Afrikaans.

Funnily enough, Afrikaans evolved as a language of its own through a simplification of Dutch so that the slaves could communicate with the Dutch and each other since they all came from different countries and cultures. Muslims were the first to write texts in Afrikaans.
Cape Carnival

Each year on the 2nd of January, the Bo-Kaap celebrates a big street party, the “Coon Carnival” in the center of town. It was originally introduced by the Muslim slaves who celebrated their only day off work in the whole year. Nowadays men, woman, and children march from the Grand Parade to the Green Point stadium, singing, and dancing.

 

Kramat

Kramats or Muslim Shrines are burial sites of Saints of Islam. Cape Town residents have for a number of generations paid their respects these Shrines. There are three Karamats in Bo Kaap, and Signal Hill behind BoKaap has two.

 

 

Bo-Kaap Museum

One of the oldest buildings in Wale Street 71 houses the “Bo-Kaap Museum”. It is necessary to see since it feels like your stepping back in time. Built in by Jan de Waal in 1768, the museum was originally the home of Abu Bakr Effendi, a well-known Turkish scholar and prominent leader in the Muslim community. He was brought here in the mid-19th century to help quell feuding between Muslim factions and is believed to have written one of the first books in Afrikaans. The house has been furnished to re-create the lifestyle of a typical Malay family in the 19th century within a national socio-political and cultural context. Look for works by artist Gregoire Boonzaire, who’s famous for capturing the chaos and charm of neighborhoods such as the Bo-Kaap and District Six.

The Dutch brought slaves that were skilled artisans, political exiles, artisans, religious leader’s famous scholars, and convicts too. Islam, who roots started in Saudi Arabia some 1400 years ago, was brought to the Cape in the 1700’s. Skills and talents passed down from generation to generation accompanied these slaves. Not only skilled artisan but also superb cooks and cuisines blossomed. The Cape Malay Cuisine is not only delicious but also unique and has played a huge role in South African dishes.

A township tour can be one of the most illuminating and life-affirming experiences you will ever have.

 

More about expeditions in Madagascar

Fast Fascinating Facts about Madagascar

  • Rainforests and the incredible animals.

Parc National de L’Isalo is one of the country’s most spectacular regions, perfect for overnight hikes, rock-hopping along cool canyons and spotting lemurs.  It’s best to visit during the cooler months (April to October) when the bizarre patchy podiums and periwinkles are in flower on the rock faces and walking is more comfortable.

“Parc national de l’Isalo”

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  • Tribute to Ancestors

The Sakalava people used to bury their dead in caves high up on cliff faces. Spread across 152,000 hectares, the Tsingy de Bemaraha Strict Nature Reserve has amazing forests, lakes and mangrove swamps, home to a variety of rare and endangered birds and lemurs. With gorges, rivers, and Ancient cemeteries Tsingyis a must visit.

 

Madagascar People
But Madagascar isn't all just animals and conservation.  
  • Madagascar Soul History

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There’s a lot of history going on down as well. Ambohimanga is one of the summer palaces of the old Malagasy royal family. Antananarivo, or Tana, has a distinctively French flavor: The city is built on three levels.

 

Dominating the city is the Queen’s Palace and associated Royal Village or Rova. Now a national monument, it was once the residence of the Merina Dynasty which, in the 19th century, united all Madagascar for the first time.

There are the museums d’Andafiavaratra and the archaeology museum. On the lowest level is the market said to bee the second-largest in the world. The birthplace of the Malagasy state. Ambohimanga is known as ‘the blue city’, ‘the holy city’ and ‘the forbidden city’. The citadel was an important Merina stronghold and its main gate is an enormous stone disc; 40 men were needed to roll it into position.

Madagascar Museums

Or else you can check out the old pirate colony island of Ile St Marie. Its dense vegetation and the difficulty of navigating the lagoons which surround it made it an ideal base for pirates and, later, a colony for convicts.

There are many clove plantations and several historic sites, including Madagascar’s oldest Catholic church. It’s the perfect destination for those who just want to relax.  You can snorkel, sunbathe and overindulge on coconut rum punches.

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  • Feel and Taste Madagascar

Buy cinnamon, vanilla and coconut oil from the local children, sip fiery ti-punch and sample the most delicious freshly-caught seafood or sit under a palm tree on a white sandy beach. There’s whale-watching in July and August, and the amazing spiny forest along the road just north of Mangilly is well worth a look.With coral reefs just offshore, sea breezes whispering in the casuarina trees and a relaxed tropical ambiance, who wants to go home?

Malagasy soothing tunes (myspace.com/tambatra) by our  conttributor glamorous soul sister from Madagascar  (myspace.com/tambatra myspace.com/tambatra1)

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Check this out. Air Madagascar, serves numerous destinations throughout the country, which is a good thing considering that many roads have huge potholes and are impassable in the rainy season. Flights are still relatively inexpensive and they offer a 50% discount on domestic flights to passengers using the airline to travel to Madagascar.

The taxi-be, which is quick and comfortable, and the bush taxi, which is cheaper, slower, makes more stops and generally operates on cross-country routes. Fares should be agreed in advance. It is a flat fee. Alternatively, you can go via bus bonus a flat rate is charged irrespective of the distance traveled. Alternatively, take the House-pousse – the rickshaw.

If you are feeling adventurous, you can grab a stagecoach. A few covered wagons continue to take passengers. Otherwise, you can hire a car or motorbike. You will need a national driving license, and remember they drive on the right-hand side.

Or you can catch a train! Only if you have a lot of time. The Malagasy railway network dates from the colonial period, so breakdowns are frequent, a line may be closed for several weeks.

However, there is nothing to beat messing around in boats. Madagascar has a strong maritime tradition. Ferries sail between the islands. You can travel between coastal villages in dugout canoes known as Pirogues or Lakana. You can also hire Dhows and larger cargo boats.

And if you want to bareboat, a “guide” is usually included in the price of the yacht charter. He will cook, guide you, and protect the boat. A yacht charter to Madagascar is a bit of a “Robinson Crusoe” adventure. Once you embark, you cannot provision again and must live off the fish and seafood you will catch for yourself (or with your guide). So get a good one.

Madagascar is a great place to tour by bike and staying in small towns and villages along the way gives a real sense of what the country is all about. A mountain bike or heavy-duty tourer at least is required as the roads can be in poor to terrible condition.

Generally, there is little to no traffic, which makes cruising a great escapade. The people are amazingly friendly and you will be greeted with crowds of children shouting ‘Vazaha’. There are little or no facilities for cyclists, so be prepared to camp rough (ask if it is somebody’s land and never too near a family grave) or sleep in very basic guesthouses. Though you will generally be invited to stay in people’s houses. Bring a spare tire, puncture kit, chain, brake/gear cable, derailleur, and all the tools you need.

Remember that the law is that the ‘tour’ operators have to have a contract with you with all the details on it including the route. The police do check on this and it protects the tourists.

All visitors must have visas, except for citizens of some African countries. Proof of return ticket is required otherwise a deposit must be paid before arriving in Madagascar, which is equivalent to the cost of a flight to the country of origin. And if you come from Africa, you must have a yellow fever vaccination certificate.

  • Fast Facts 

  • Currency -Malagasy Ariary (MGA) Us dollars needs to be declared on arrival. There are currency restrictions
  • Electrical Power is 127V/220V, RUNNING AT 50Hz.
  • Languages Spoken : Malagasy, French, English
  • Time Zones – GMT/UTC +3:
  • Country Dialing Code +261:
  • Hot and subtropical climate, colder in the mountains.
  • Rainy season: November to March.
  • Dry season: April to October.
  • Monsoon season is December to March.
.. And when you've had 16 tracks of Malagasy hospitality, the last thing you'll be feeling is lonely - except perhaps when you arrive back home.

 

Madagascar Food and Music for the Soul


Madagascar Food

Burnt the rice? No problem. One common Madagascar dish is Ranon ‘apango or rano vda. Burnt rice water.

Malagasy cooks double the quantity of rice they need for the meal.  When it’s cooked, they remove most of the rice from the earthenware pan. The remainder (a layer about 1/2-inch thick) is heated until it’s burnt. Then pour boiling water over the rice. Cool, strain and chill.

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Language

The majority of people don’t speak English, so brush up on your French which is the second official language of Madagascar. Otherwise it’s Malagasy all the way.

The main Malagasy phrases

Madagascar Music and Dance

 

The beauty of traveling in Madagascar is that you’re never sure what you’re going to hear next. The Madagascar music experience is like Forrest Gump’s ‘box of choc-o-lates’: you never know what you’re gonna get. Music is ubiquitous: The national music scene is booming, with artists from all the major regions turning out serious volumes of quality material. But locals retain a fondness for the usual African favorites: reggae, rap, chart hits, French pop, gospel, music, heavy metal, jazz and reggae Congolese

MUSIC BY LALAH RAINDIMBY OUR MARVELOUS MADAGASCAR CONTRIBUTOR:
https://myspace.com/tambatra
https://myspace.com/tambatra1

The national Madagascar music scene is booming, with artists from with  volumes of material of  striking quality

The Madagascar music experience is like Forrest Gump’s ‘box of choc-o-lates’: you never know what you’re gonna get.

But locals retain a fondness for the usual African favourites: reggae, rap, chart hits, French pop, gospel, music, heavy metal, jazz and reggae Congolese Lingala and good ol’ country music.

Africa’s biggest homegrown reggae superstar, Lucky Dube is even bigger here than the godfather Bob Marley himself.

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The best thing to come out of Madagascar since the lemur is the music. Malagasy music rocks. the rhythms are tight. They combine virtuoso traditional music,  tight harmonies, buoyant grooves, infectious melodies, wild instruments, energetic dancing along with challenging, controversial subjects with the energy of punk rock. Malagasy hip hop broke into the mainstream in the mid-nineties and has skyrocketed.

MALAGASY MUSIC

 

Like the Salegy – a funky, tight, energetic form of dance music dominated by ringing electric guitars. In the kind of touristy clubs where the girls are cheaper than the beer. You’ll find out just how much the Malagasy love to dance. If you’re not a rug-cutter yourself, sit back with a Three Horse Beer and watch all the girls line up and bust their moves in front of the mirror (yes, every club has at least one). And then, just when you think you’ve got a handle on ‘Gasy

If you’re not a rug-cutter yourself, sit back with a Three Horse Beer and watch all the girls line up and bust their moves in front of the mirror (yes, every club has at least one). And then, just when you think you’ve got a handle on ‘Gasy clublife… Glenn Miller – ‘In The Mood’…this happens.in absolutely any club, anywhere in the country, you can guarantee that at some point the music will suddenly segue into jazz dance and the whole crowd will burst into energetic and clearly practiced swing and rock ‘n’ roll routines. Learn a few steps and you’ll probably make friends for life.

And the music isn’t just music.  It’s got a big history of political power. Hiragasy troupes were used during the French colonial administration to communicate decrees. Now musos like superstar Rossy’s 1995 song “Lera.”, mobilizes popular support for political efforts.

Malagasy revere ancestors, and ignoring the dead could bring bad luck. Someone who refuses to turn the ancestors denies his identity as a Malagasy. And if the ancestors can intercede with the Creator to bless the living with wealth, health, and happiness or, if mistreated, curse them with unemployment, disease, and misery. People lead good lives so that they, too, will be honored as ancestors some day.

In some famadihanas (funeral traditions), the families take the bodies on a stroll through town, to show the ancestors what is new, and introduce them to children born since they left the tomb. The thinking is that, to help the living, the dead must be familiar with their lives.

Famadihana

Welcome to Africa :  #EXPLOREMOTHERLANDAFRICA

Special thank you to  Freeway  Tours SADC Team: Thandi Brewer, Julie Hall, Jerry  Mofokeng (Freeway), Leslie Fong,( SPY) Lalah Raindimby, and MoMo Matsunyane (PADKOS),  Neo Matsunyane , Sonto Nhlapo, Alex Mamacos, Makgomotho Ngwasheng, Babalo Mpoyiya

In Memory of W.G Robertson

ONLY IN TANZANIA! PART ONE: Why choose Tanzania as a travel destination?

Recently in a conversation with an eager traveler on the lookout for the best Safari, I was asked, why Tanzania?  A good Safari is just that, anywhere. I could not answer him. It was not a single line answer for a short conversation.  I thought about it for several days........What will you get 'Only in Tanzania'. What are the unique aspects of Tanzania?

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Why travel to Tanzania?


Why choose to safari in Tanzania? Well, it is the beginning of creation?

Why ? I embarked on a journey to gather myriads of reasons. And there are much more. An eternal series.

There is so much unique to ‘just Tanzania’. We have birds, trees, fish, mammals and even butterflies that you will see only in Tanzania!

Let’s talk about Tanzania.

As I clearly spelt out in ‘Exploring the splendor of Tanzania’, my echo continues ………….

‘Journey into all dimensions delving into the mystics and wonders of the heart of ‘Motherland Africa’: Tanzania

On a general  fact and  figures note :
We have the mainland, previously known as  ‘Tanganyika’  just after Independence when it merged with Zanzibar and became known as Tanzania.
  • Tanzania, the mainland together with the island of Pemba and Zanzibar cover  945,200 sq.km.
  • The agricultural country Tanzania has 40 million hectares of arable land
  •  It is abundant in natural resources including minerals, flora, and fauna.
  • The Ngorongoro Crater (3,647 meters) is  the largest in the entire world and has the largest concentration of animal species
  • Lake Tanganyika is second deepest and  the longest and second deepest lake in the world
  • Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa
  •  Lake Victoria the second largest lake in the world.
  • There are also other lakes such as Lake Nyasa, Lake Rukwa, Lake Eyas and Lake Natron that pieces up the inland water to 60,000 sq.km
  • Tanzania has  coastal line of that is unbroken for approximately 800 kilometers. The ideal beach getaway.
  • Tanzania portions part of biodiversity spots:

  • the Coastal Forests of Eastern Africa(CEPF)
  • Eastern Afromontane (CEPF)
  • The Eastern Arc Forests (WWF)
  • aCoastal East Africa (FEOW)
  • World’s three richest lakes for endemic freshwater fish species

  • Lake Victoria (FEOW)
  • Lake Tanganyika(FEOW)
  • Lake Malawi (FEOW).
Lake Victoria

All you can find in Tanzania and nowhere else!

citizen report announced that 27  new endemic species of animals were discovered, exclusive to Tanzania. Not anywhere else in the world but in Tanzania’s the Eastern Arc Mountains.

The biological potential was an instant qualification to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

Scientists from the Italian Science Museum advocating range inclusion in the Unesco list spent an entire decade surveying the mountains in Tanzania. Twenty-seven  vertebrate species were found in the forests new to  science and fourteen other species discovered that were unknown before

UdzungwaMountains forests in the south-central of Tanzania,  researchers found a multitude species whose confined to the Eastern Arc mountain range,  A curious chameleon species was of three newly discovered reptiles belonging to genus Kinyongia. A Mahege Mountains discovery.

The geologically ancient mountains and forests persistence of forests for millions of years result in extraordinary living forms.

It is an important site existing in Africa for vertebrate forms. Some of these species are one hundred million years old and are evidence of forest stability and unique evolutionary history of the mountains.

Red Colobus Monkey

We have a list of mammal and tree species endemic to Tanzania, and probably much more will be discovered.

Explore Motherland Africa – Tanzania will continue posts in the  ‘ Only in Tanzania’  stream in a discovery of all the unique features in the heart of The Motherland -Tanzania!

Tanzania butterfly

 

 

 

 

Getting ready for a backpacking venture in Tanzania

With its natural landscapes of wonder,the blessed land of Tanzania is one unforgettable destination to set foot on in the world. 




It is not extremely expensive, but there is so much to do. This leaves you yearning to experience all you can, that can leave your wallets undernourished and the magnetism will leave you craving to come back.

Get Budget Wise in a Smart sense

 

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The Venture to Travel Africa – Tanzania

A ‘must have’ trip to Tanzania can include mountain climbing, safaris, city bustling excitement and beach relax escapades. The ideal backpacking trip venture can include reaching the highest summit to the wilderness of Serengeti in the north until chimpanzees at the Gombe national park in the west.

The Tanzanian journey for most and many begin in the city of Dar-es-Salaam, the capital of Tanzania, a natural start for a tour around  Tanzania.

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It is a fascinating mixture of cultures. Dar-es-Salaam is a compelling insight into city life in Africa.  The Kariakoo market is jam-packed with an allure of remarkable food and exotic products. Dance and nightclub joints leave you thumping to East African beats of Tanzania

There are cities in the north and the south of Dar-es-Salaam where you find camping and beach relaxation points. It is recommended to get in tune with Tanzania in the city a few days before jetting off to the natural wonders beyond the buzzing city life.

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Trekking and Wildlife in Tanzania- The North

The essence of a  travel in Africa is an experience of rich unique nature and wildlife.  The northern side is where Mount Kilimanjaro the highest summit in Africa is located and amazing sightings along the way. A week can be dedicated to climbing the mountain.  On route up, there are cabins and camps to spend nights and rest. It is possible to climb Kilimanjaro at any fitness or temperature level. Reaching the top can be tedious but exhilarating!

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Safari in Tanzania

We have ample opportunities in Northern Tanzania to experience fascinating wildlife on a safari tour. There are alternatives to the known and most visited parks like Serengeti National Park. One is the Arusha National Park, between Mount Meru and Kilimanjaro.

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Arusha National Park has a wide variety of flora and fauna that differs from the Serengeti National Park. It has savannah, marshes, and forests. The highlights include the  Ngurdoto Crater,  Mount Meru and  Momela Lakes.

Mount Meru is the alternative to climbing Kilimanjaro. A unique opportunity to explore abundant wildlife. There are buffaloes, elephants, zebras,  antelopes, monkey and bird types and leopards too.

There is a wide range of Safari options including the Lake Manyara National Park. The park has teeming hippos and gains its fame for masses of flamingos.

Another highlight is tree climbing lions. Spend a  tent night camp and the evening can be spent absorbing and reflecting on the mesmerising day experiences and watch the sunset in a backdrop of huge baobab trees.

If you decide to travel through the west of Tanzania, chimpanzees in Gombe are the highlight in the Gombe Stream National Park. The park is near the border of Burundi near the Tanganyika lake and the only pathway there is a boat ride to the deepest Africa continent endeavor.

Jane Goodall researched chimp behavior in Tanzania since 1960.  Chimpanzee sightings are special experiences. Baboons and monkey sightings, as well as approximately 200 bird species, can be possible in Gombe. There are many options of accommodation in lodges and lakeside camps or the permanent campsites.

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The Remote Wild of Tanzania: Kalambo and Katavi

Close by Lake Tanganyika next to the Zambia border is the Kalambo waterfalls. These are the second highest in Africa, 235 m tall.  Visit Kalambo in conjunction with a trip to the Katavi National Park. The least visited because of it so so remote. Great opportunities to see wildlife. Katavi, a river delta has may elephants, hippos, and crocodiles

Serengeti

The highlights include the mesmerizing annual migration of the wildebeests in Serengeti. The south Serengeti and moving to northern Kenya as well as the Maasai Mara from about August to September. Safaris are in the range of $300 for about three or four days if you carefully plan.

Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro with its snow-capped peak is a drawing card on a note. Experts say that the top glacier with the iconic snowcap will melt away by 2020, so get a move on to experience the soon to be the extinct wonder! The costs are between $850 and 5000 depending mainly on your willingness to rough it up.

Zanzibar

Zanzibar, the spice island in the world apart from the mainland of Tanzania, it is a hidden Arabic alcove, and if you ignore the five-star hotels, you can experience the island that is forgotten by time. Blue waters and giant tortoises together with food markets to making your mouth water in a full moon party.

Ngorongoro Crater

Ngorongoro Crater has more animals than you can imagine. It is brutally something else. Even months can pass by in a heartbeat in Tanzania.

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The Tanzania  Backpackers Budget

  •  $30 to  $40 per day  excluding Safaris and climbing Kilimanjaro
  • Food: expect to spend $4 for each meal on the street and about $ 3 to $5 at semi décor cafés. Accommodation ranges from $10 to $15 dollars per night
  • Transport: Buses are about  3 dollars for an hour of travel, but it is common for them to be late
  • Zanzibar is almost 100  percent Islamic and culturally sensitive with dress and behavior. The mainland is more of a mixture but cultural awareness remains key.

There is Visa and MasterCard ATMs  in most of the major towns and cities, visa is at $50 and are available when you land at the airports

Travel to Tanzania and start changing life and influencing others breaking free from to ‘real world’ padlocks in the wastelands that drown magnificence.

Geplaatst door Shabani Mpita op maandag 22 mei 2017

Reaching The Highest Point in Africa – Kilimanjaro

 

Kilimanjaro is the tallest and the most famous mountain in the continent of motherland  Africa.
Mount Kilimanjaro is in the north of Tanzania, located in the Kilimanjaro National Park.

tanzania-kilimanjaro

All About Kilimanjaro: The  Top of Africa

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Kilimanjaro is a dormant volcano which has three separate volcanic cones, Mawenzi, Shira and Kibo, where the Uhuru summit is located.

Kibo is dormant but it is not extinct.  Three hundred and sixty years ago, the last eruption from Kibo occurred. Volcanic activity that occurred  two hundred years back and resulted in the ash pit (that is visible from the Uhuru Peak)

Hikers journey through five differing ecosystems – from alpine desert to rainforest right up to the arctic snowcap. Climbing 19,340 feet up is undoubtedly an empowering adventure of note.

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 Approximately 35,000 people launch to climb each year. The number of people that actually reach the top of the summit remains an elusive statistic.

The “Kili” climbs can take between five and nine days, depending on the route you choose and the time you have for the mission and reach the altitude.

There is a total of  Kilimanjaro routes. Three routes from the south including, Machame, Marangu and Umbwe , two routes from the west – Lemosho and Shira, from the  North-East Rongai.  Another option is the Northern Circuit approaching from the with Lemosho as the starting point, and circles around the north  following a summit passage through Gilman’s Point.

The first successful Kilimanjaro expedition took place 125 years ago. In October 1889, mountain climbers on a mission to reach the peak conquered the Mount Kilimanjaro after forty years of previous attempts.

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Mount Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa, the most iconic peak in the world.

 The Venture to Kilimanjaro

Snow capped and close to the equator, Mount Kilimanjaro attracts climbers from all over the globe. Reaching Africa’s highest point is a challenge many seek to undertake. Why?

It is Africa’s highest mountain and the world’s highest freestanding mountain.

Open plains rise up to touch soaring clouds with snow capped peaks at an elevation of 5895m.

Every ecological system existing in the world can be found on the mountain from tropical crops to cultivated slopes, lush forests n wild animals. Cactus like plantations, giant lobelia lies in above the forest. A saddle stretches between the Mawezi and Kobo peaks.

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Cactus like plantations, giant lobelia lies in above the forest. A saddle stretches between the Mawezi and Kobo peaks.

The roof of Africa is a wonderland of magnificent beauty.

Kilimanjaro is an accessible summit. The Kobo peak can be reached without any special mountaineering equipment or climbing experience. A determination with proper clothing is all that is needed. The climb takes about six days with about five overnight stays in tents or mountain huts.
Gillman’s point is the lower peak on Kobo and Uhuru peak is the highest point. Spectacular glacier views and a wide crater.It is unforgettable triumph point expedition.

 Main tips to take note off.

  • Tourists need to register and climb with a licensed guide.
  • Kilimanjaro is not as easy as literature reads out. The trail is steep and sections are filled with boulders that are two foot high
  • Altitude sickness can affect the fittest.

Knowing all these tips many venture for the  climb again to make it to the absolute top of Kilimanjaro

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If you ever make it take a Kilimanjaro expedition, it is the most beautiful place that you will ever reach. It is pushing

The clearest night sky and willowy grass and the second peak loom ominously and untouched as it is an impossible climb.

There is much more along the way to Uhuru. It is about pushing yourself to the limits to gorgeous views from Uhuru, the summit of the Kibo peak.  The entire climb takes you into another world.

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Africa Aesthetic Vintage Design Wonders

Get the feel of Motherland Africa, right in your home

Homes are special spaces for all. From ecstatic regular travelers and ambitious wanderers to ‘stay at home’ enthusiasts, all will agree that there is no place like home with a feel,sense and touch of the magnificent continent,our Africa.

A few can reach their dreams in travels to explore the motherland  Africa and collect journey memoirs on the pathway.

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There is a growing need to reach out for the best Africa aura of style and comfort in every home or living space.

Pablo Design Gallery

It should reflect the ultimate retreat, an outlet to peacefully cuddle into peace, embracing every savoring moment, after a long day in the out in the world.

Africa is vast sprawling all the way from Morroco and Egypt in the north to the Southern tip of Africa where the two oceans meet. Each country has a unique style. The common aspect is vibrant earth tones.

The common aspect is earth tones and vibrant color splashes. Decorating African theme homes have so many options available and identifying selections is crucial as it vibrates impact on the energy and feel of individual spaces.

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The root of Africa décor is the inspiration from nature. Animal wood carvings and colorful fabrics express an appreciation of cultural history.

The African dream, the African inspiration is possible with timeless piece collections in your office or home.

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Animals were and always will be a central theme in fabrics and artwork. Animals that appeal to interior designers are lions, elephants, zebras and leopards.

SCULPTURE

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The possibilities are endless from carved napkin holders in animal shapes to rugs with zebra images. Black, brown, beige and white are neutral colors for walls and floors. African artwork or black and white animal photography conjures the energy and feel of virility, strength and power.

There are various textile options available from the motherland of Africa. Hand-painted batiks from Zimbabwe in tablecloths and pillowcases to placemats and table runners. Culturally rich and distinctive Mud cloth, handwoven from Mali.Wall hangings from depicting village lives. Wooden sculptures and Africa artefacts like masks, purses, pouches walking sticks and smoking pipes make decorative pieces.

Africa décor can take the form of tiling with terracotta or sandstone tiles. Concrete floors treated and stained are common in southern Africa and are cool in hot climates.

 

A home with a twist ethnic African design flair is not an impossible dream. Start with bookstores and visit museums that display Africa objects and textiles. Or travel to Africa and get an authentic feel.

Accent home-style pieces with an antique style create aesthetic living spaces with a unique hint of definition engraved from historic African root marvels. Stepping back into time in amazing energy of appreciation of creation and adds a unique touch and sense to homes.

Antique furniture from Africa has a unique appeal of richness to any home. The solid, sturdy construction define unique touch of splendor to every element of lifestyle space, be it in the form of kitchen cabinets, a dining room table, a home office desk or bedroom space and more.

 African antique furniture designs.

Africa vintage furniture adds to the realm of prideful ownership. The aura and style set forth an era of passion, embracing that “once upon a time” realm of authenticity and pureness in home décor.