#CreatepreneurAfrica -Nigeria’s broadcaster,Tushbee the Tori Goddess……

Divine O James, fondly called Tushbee the Tori goddess is set to take the world by storm. She is a broadcaster, career speaker,compere, model and a humanitarian that cares for widows!

Born and bred in Port Harcourt, River State into the family of James Ikrechero, her broadcasting career initialized in 2012 with Treasure FM, Port Harcourt, a radio Nigeria subsidiary.

She relocated to Lagos in 2015 to pursue her career. She worked for Eko FM, the official radio broadcaster of Lagos, Brands on Tv, Happenings, and Emplugmedia.

She founded the organisation “Tushbee and the widows”, singlehandedly and wholeheatedly, taking on the task to care for widows.

“Tushbee and the widows”, was inspired out of love for my late grandmother. She was a widow. She use to share her stories with me after my grandfather passed on. I cared so much for when she was alive. After her death,  I decided to extend the same love and care to as many widows as possible

She love the arts, she loves nature….

Recently she interviewed Femi Odugbemi, Africa’s documentary king!

 I love to explore and i love to try out new and serious tasks

 

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica “Tushbee the Tori Goddess”

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My passion drives me to climax. I love broadcasting. Radio to be precise. I am so committed to it. Radio is my better half.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was watching television when I was ten years old. I saw Aisha Bello of NTA Nigeria, taking the 9 pm news. There and then I fell in love with her and her profession, and I said to myself ……I will be a broadcaster.


What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

My audience…… my audience appeals to me the most 

What drove you to make money from your passions?

I was driven by living and loving what I do. Pay comes when the time is right and you keep your passion.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
 

It was in the year 2003

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?


My late mother, Mrs. Ozioma Blessing James, kept me going. There was a time I lost focus and vision, but my late mother pushed me so hard. Even when I failed, she guided my path and said :

‘This is not where you supposed to be, keep moving’

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 My late grandmother, Mrs. Grace Ihauku Azuonye Ndimele, she was and still is my motivating factor for success.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?


They should keep doubting!

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?
Well, they should discover what they are in love with and love it with all their heart. They should be committed to what they love. Volunteer to work for free, build integrity around passion. Money will come…

#CreatePreneurAfrica, Tanzania Rhythm with Saxophonist Zephania Malembela

In his early childhood, he actively engaged in a school band playing Ndulilu, (a local flute). In later teen years he initiated playing the keyboard and joined in the church choir.

He tuned his destiny into a melodious pathway when he laid his hands on a harmonious discovery.....an abandoned saxophone that collected dust in a church.........

Welcome to the world of Zaphania Melembela, a saxophonist from the shores of East Africa, Tanzania.
Rooted in a musical family of love from the Sukuma ethnic group , where traditional music is a key component of every social activity, Zephaniah completed high school and relocated to Dar-es-Salaam to pursue a new chapter of higher education.
Education curriculums did not usually include any formal music lessons. In 2009 he enrolled at the Dar-Es-Salaam Institute of Technology and successfully completed his studies in Science and laboratory Technology in 2013.
The Institute of Technology was not a waste of time, it was strategic articulation to secure a day job and finance formal music lessons from beginner to advanced levels. The studies in technology became a great back up.
 |||A career in music was something that no parent in Tanzania would wish his/her child to pursue at the time|||
He never swayed from his passion for music, even though he had no formal music training.
The year 2012 marked an eventful turnaround year for Zephania. He met a friend from Nigeria who had a book on saxophones….and then there was a church with a forgotten saxophone that nobody bothered to learn playing.
A year of self-teaching continued with little progress. Then in October 2013, he met Frank Masamba , the famous composer and saxophonist since the 1980”s
Frank just returned from Mombasa(Kenya, where he worked as a hotel entertainer.
Zephania gained key insight into saxophone techniques and learned the foundation of African music.
This continued till 2014. He continued as a church musician and started exploring beyond church walls, engaging in music with other bands that were not in religious contexts. He also performed as a solo saxophonist at social functions.
In 2015 his formal music training continued when he engaged in music lessons with Innocent Mkuyuli, a pianist and music educator at the International School of Tanganyika.
His journey continued in music theory and practical musicianship on the tenor saxophone as a principal instrument, he continues with advancing to this present day.
Zephania has worked with bands like the Swahili Blues Band and performed at the Sauti Busara music festival in Zanzibar. He toured internationally with the band and performed with the King of Ethiojazz Mulatu Astatke at the African Jazz Village in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 2015.
He has also accompanied a Jazz Music legend Tu Nokwe from South Africa during the Bagamoyo International Festival of Arts and Culture in 2015.
The music industry in Tanzania has evolved into much more opportunities for a committed musician to lead a successful career in music.

There is a calling for more instrumental and  music teachers are more performers.Technology  paves a way for artists to explore global markets in the music industry. Things have changed for the better.

Saxophonist Zephania Malembela
He has been featured in many albums by other artists both on religious and non-religious music arenas in Tanzania and outside Tanzania. He has been acclaimed by listeners and fans to have a rich tone with a special articulation on his instrument.
Currently, he is a member of the Pentanote Trio working with a renowned jazz pianist Barikeyz Mmbaga and his young brother John Mmbaga, a drummer.
 
He is working on his first solo instrumental album which focuses on a fusion of native music with western and jazz tastes. The album will be released soon.

 Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica , Zephania Melembela

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
What drives me is love. I am a product of love, love from the creator, love from my parents and from the society around me. All the love I received and continue to receive has taught me to value an adventure of becoming a good person and to love every human being by giving my best out of talents and potentials which are invested inside me, music being a major part of me.
How did you find your passion and how old were you? 
The passion has always been with me from the beginning. I come from a musical family, a family that for many generations has taken a leading role of music in its society. My mother, being the nearest of all other family members became my inspiration as she would sing, compose and teach song to a local church choir and she even played guitars very well.
At an age of 13 years I joined the choir she was leading and I started learning to play the keyboard and she was my first music teacher even though she had no formal music classes. She knew how chords were supposed to sound though she didn’t know how to play the keyboard.
We would search and combine the sounds of the keyboard to match the guitar chords that she made on the guitar. That is how it started and the rest is history.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
To be relevant to my world by doing the things that complement my talents and potential endowed inside me. Music being among them. To make life a meaningful adventure for me, my family and every other people I can get into contact whether physically or through other media like this.
 What drove you to make money from your passion?
I believe that someone doing his/her passion and being rewarded financially, for it is a sure way of growing the passion to its ultimate potential. This is what drives me to make money from my passion. My passion has to sustain me and to make my family’s life progressive in all spheres that need progress. This is how commitment to passion intensifies. It doesn’t make sense doing your passion with all efforts and then expect to sustain your own life with something else. This will only kill talents and potential and the passion itself altogether.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
It was when I was 22 years old. I had my first payment as a church musician for a church which was just being inaugurated. Later I have been able to extend my horizon beyond the four walls of the church to non-religious arenas musically.
As I said, money is just a reward. I am committed to my passion beyond monetary expectations. Making money is not a goal but money reward facilitates me to achieve the goals.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up? 
No! Giving up? How can someone give up on being themselves? If someone gives up on becoming themselves then who do they want to become as a result? My passion (Music) is who I am, I have never tried to think of giving up because it is like betraying myself and trying to become someone else.
Yes, there have been challenges in the journey and they are still coming even now but I try as much to solve them. It is in solving these challenge progress realizes. I solve my challenges and try to seek other people’s help when things get beyond my capacity. I enjoy working in teams that way.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 
To live an authentic life, to be who I am and to unleash my full potentials as a human being. Success is a process and not a destination. When I wind up my day being better than the previous day musically then I am successful and this continues that way to me, trying to improve myself more every day.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 
Doubt is a source of wisdom. For me, being doubted brought positive results. It created to me an avenue to question my inner man and to make a decision based on who I really am and what I am supposed to do with the gift of life I have been blessed with. Though their doubts I was able to find myself.
I will always listen to their doubts about me and I will then keep perfecting myself in order to become my best.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 
My advice to them is; Look for that reason, that special purpose, that mission you were created for and then build a beautiful life for yourself and those you love around that reason.
Listen to your inner man and be true to yourself. This will lead you to living your authentic life. It is the best reward that you can do to yourself. Be determined, be dedicated, be disciplined and be willing to sacrifice for that reason. All the rest will fall in their positions. You deserve to be happy, this is the cost of becoming one.

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Nigeria’s Lieutenenant Alexander Emmanuel Ochogwu

 

Welcome to the world of an academic, teacher, lover of arts and author, Alexander Emmanuel Ochogwu, ready to embrace a world of peace!

 

 

Air Force Flight Lieutenant
Strategist
Poet and Writer
Expert in Peace, Security and Conflict Studies

 

His debut  “Diary of a Boy Soldier”, a historical fiction, is a first-hand literary revelation that chronicles everyday realms in the dynamic life and times of being a student at the Nigerian Military school

The unique storytelling journeys through adventures, thrills, and suffering encapsulated in the diaspora of life experiences at a military school in West Africa.

 

 

 “Omo” made the list of Daily Trust Newspaper ‘Most Anticipated Book of 2018’, amongst other pre-published recognitions. 

I like music, musing, surfing, traveling, solitude and locked up in God’s Presence.I am focused, with an eye for excellence. I believe in me.I can CHANGE the WORLD  : Alexander Emmanual Ochogwu

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica,Alexander Emmanual Ochogwu Air Force Flight Lieutenant

Tell us what drives you?

The realisation that life is ephemeral and the value we add along our journey through this path is what matters.

What is your true passion in life?

To invest my personality by way of mentorship and artistic expressions, on others as much as I can so as to make the world around me better than I met it.

How did you find you passion and how old were you?

Finding my passion was accidental. I was barely twelve when I realised I had elements of creative writing skill. My classmates back at Nigerian Military School Zaria (A military secondary school in Nigeria) had rewarded me with gifts whenever I wrote love letters or constructed persuasive letters on their behalf, to their parents.

Knowing I was sought after gave me the validation that I had this skill inside me. Subsequently, I became intentional about it  – did more studies about the art and began building my vocabulary library, as we used to call it back then.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The understanding that through writing and mentorship I can impart lives.

What drove you to make money from your passion?

Money is good, yeah. However, for me, money comes second place after my passion, which is to add value to my world. With my understanding that when one meets a need, reward follows, meeting a need is my drive. Money naturally comes as the reward.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

As an amateur writer in secondary school, I had received gifts and cash tokens as appreciation for the work I did.

But since I took up writing professionally, I started getting paid for my work in 2005 when I wrote my debut novella, The Diary of a Boy Soldier.

What kept you going when you were about giving up?

The biggest challenge I had was that of external validation until I discovered that I had my own unique voice and had to stick with it. So I resolved within myself that I have a special skill that requires no further validation for me to operate within the space of my belief. This decision got me over the waves of discouragement and discontentment.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

The realization that knowledge is inexhaustible and as such, the need to continually improve myself through learning from others so that I can give back to my downlines.

What do you have to say to all those who doubted you?

For all those who doubted me, I am grateful to them for making me excel above their doubts. They made me work harder and redefined myself to what I have become today, the very thing they had wanted to prevent me from becoming. They were a catalyst to this success story.

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

As a creative, you must be ruthless with your passion. You must be open to learning and abreast of trends in your area of interest. The world is not friendly enough to accept you with ease. So you must be up-to-date, proficient and competitive in the marketplace.

Strive to break through, create your own unique voice, and shout until you are heard. Additionally, you must identify what your true motivation is, and when you find it, nothing can deter you from achieving it.

Your true motivation should not be money. Otherwise, you may give up when money fails to show up as planned.

#CreatepreneurAfrica, Liberian Patrice Juah – “A Gem of Unimaginable Proportions”

Writer                                          Poet Continue reading #CreatepreneurAfrica, Liberian Patrice Juah – “A Gem of Unimaginable Proportions”

#CreatepreneurAfrica- ‘Afrodazzled’ Kenyan Artist Cyrus Kabiru- “C-Stunner Spectacular Spectacles”

Trashy Business- Give trash a second Chance .

Cyrus Kabiru

Electronic refuse dumps in the Nairobi, the capital of Kenya was a stepping stone for Cyrus Kabiru as he gave dumped materials new life.

 

His creative pathways embody soul playfulness and inspire the  Nairobi youth and creatives alike.

C. Kabiru

 

He steps in various aspects of art, between sculpture, performance, and fashion.

His gallery has sculptures, glasses and humorous canvassed painting portrayals of contemporary life in Kenya. Bottle caps are sewn together depicting African nature.

 

Artwork beyond the regular , his life journey is embodied in the prosthetic knowledge gallery.

His obsession with eyewear all started when his father refused to get him ordinary spectacles, so he created his own special twist in eyewear. He turns spectacles into various forms that enter a new realm of creativity into the beyond

My spectacles draw curiosity and attention . It therapeutical in a sense!

 

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica Spectacular Inventor Cyrus Kabiru

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
 My passion….. My passion is my creation. My passion is my art.
How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

A young age, I forget how young I was. I just know my dad inspired me. He did not like the ordinary in anything! even refused to get me glasses I desired, so I created them!

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
Art defines me. If there was no art there would me know me.I would feel like I live a soulless life.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
What drove me? It kind of came naturally. People started to buy my art. They started requesting my art and wanting to pay for it.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
 In 2005. My uncle bought from me for $9.
After that, he felt guilty for paying such a low amount and always dashed off when he saw me!
  What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
 I used to give up on a lot of other things in life. Not my art. My work. It’s about treating it as a calling and one can never actually give up what is a natural calling. A life purpose
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 

Every day, Every morning when I wake up, I fell like I must achieve something. I want to raise my art to new heights. I want to soar my art internationally. More so.I do believe it is already there.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 

Doubt me if you need to…..thats your choice ……but not my work. It has been a long journey for me to reach where I am

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 

Just believe in what you are doing, be the best and if you want to move be your unique self. Be what you want to be

Biodiverse Rich Coastal Forest in Tanzania: Pugu Hills

 

Pugu Forest reserve in the Pwani region of Tanzania is adjacent to the Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve.These forests are considered as the oldest in the world!

There is never a shortage of places to go outside of Dar es Salaam that will take at least four hours of driving, besides the beaches, of course…a great privilege for any city.

A coastal forest reserve situated 20km from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania might not be part of traditional tour routes in Tanzania, yet it attracts a fair number of visits.  Often visited by biologists, it is a  top forest in Africa for bird conservation.

 

A 20-minute drive from the Julius Nyerere airport, the main attractions include a sacred cave of the Zaramo people, a cattle market, and fascinating bat caves, the historical remains of Colonial times including a railway tunnel and  Kaolinite industry an off course, the forest.

 

Kaolin deposits of high quality lie below Pugu Hills in the Kisarawe district. These resources are untapped despite a growing demand worldwide. Local and foreign geologists have confirmed Kaolin deposits of  2.3 billion metric tonnes.

Biodiversity richness is high with a wide range of plants, birds, reptiles, insects, and birds.

There are about fourteen known endemic plants, two endemic mammal species, and an endemic subspecies of birds.  Wildlife includes Masaai giraffes, elephants, impalas, warthogs, Tanzanian cheetahs, Africa leopards, spotted hyenas, mongooses, elephant shrews, galagos, civets, side strapped and black back jackals, and over eighty species of birds as well as bat colonies dwelling in the caves.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

Mount Meru: Tanzania cultural tour expeditions- exploring Tengeru

 

Nearby picturesque Mount Meru slopes, the second highest peak in Tanzania, lies Tengeru, 13km from Arusha on the path to Moshi.

It is simply the best base to explore cultural attractions that make up the rich heritage of the Meru tribe in Tanzania.

There are farms, banana fields and traditional homesteads on the mountain. This village near Arusha is distinct in character.

The venture is set forth exploring old coffee farms with local production of the world’s popular beverage with and then canoe into a  volcanic lake at Mount Meru foothills, home to the best birdwatching and fishing sites.

Ready to give back to communities around Kilimanjaro? Volunteer programs are on offer at all local schools in the surrounds of Mount Kilimanjaro, venture out and discover development and upliftment projects in the Tengeru Community.

Tengeru Activities

Coffee Tour

One of the major highlights in Tengeru is enjoying special home-brewed coffee with the locals.

The coffee plantations in Tengeru journey leads curiosity ventures into local homes and lessons to prepare coffee. The tour offers specially harvested coffee from the Meru community on volcanic Mout Meru foothills.

Lake Duluti Safari Tours

A close view of vegetation in Tengeru with an abundance of fauna and flora at the lakeside. Learn about mystical Meru legends and mysteries linked to Lake Duluti. Get a front seat view of birds, monkeys, reptiles, many other animals, and plants.

This tour will give you an up-close view of Tengeru’s vegetation and you will able to admire the abundant lakeside fauna and flora. You can learn about the Meru legends linked to the lake and its mysteries while getting a front-row viewing of the monkeys, birds, reptiles and many other animals whilst learning about our plant life. A magical destination of authentic traditional roots.

Tengeru Market Tour

The colorful community market, interact live and eat amongst the locals. The busiest market days are Wednesdays and Saturday

Conservation programs in Tengeru

Environment programs in a land rich with vegetation. A source of survival. The main issue is deforestation threatening ecology and the community. Participate in environmental programmes and enjoy a luscious waterfalls tour relaxing in nature marvels

Forest Tours at Mount Meru

The second highest mountain in Tanzania m Mount Meru boasts beautiful forests. Unwind and enjoy magnificence. It is a great destination for preparing for Mount Kilimanjaro expeditions

Walk through the forests of Tanzania’s second-highest mountain.

"Mringaringa" Tour

A traditional gathering place, “Mringaringa”. Listen to the wisdom of thrilling Meru culture and traditional dancing. This venue is also used for settling disputes in the community with presiding Meru elders.

Local Food Preparation and Traditional Dances

Soul soothing music and food celebrations with traditional dancing guarantee a worthwhile experience.

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

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Our City of Clay in Africa – Djenne in Mali

 

A UNESCO world heritage site, the ancient town,Djenne in the heart of  Mali,stands on Africa's mighty River Niger. A city of mud houses, streets and city walls. The ochre mud composition gives out an embezzling monochrome look.

 

 

 

The journey to Djenne is like stepping into another era. Little has changed since its prosperous 14th and 15th-century heydays.

Djenne on the flood lands of the Bani and Niger rivers is about 220 miles south-west of Timbuktu. Before  1591, Djenné became a prosperous center of slave, ivory and gold trade. Known as the oldest city in Sub Sahara Africa,  famous for its Great Mosque and market.

It was founded around 800AD by merchants and flourished. The meeting place for Sudan desert traders and Guinea tropical forests, it became an impactful trading center and thrived due to its direct river connection with Timbuktu and the head of all trade routes leading to salt and gold mines.

Controlled by empires of Morrocan kings it expanded featuring products from the north and central Africa until the French occupied in in 1893.

Commercial functions were then taken over by Mopti town in the confluence of Bani and Niger rivers, in the northeast,  An agricultural trade center, Djenne boasts Muslim Architecture and a great mosque.

The great mosque built in 1905 is a classic Sahelian mud architecture.

The highlight of each year is an event when annually, the inhabitants of the town gather and refine the mud structure, giving it a new layer to replace what torrential rains fade out. The festival of plastering event: La Fete de crepissage. 

The labors of plasterers are accompanied with a beating of drums. The drums are perched on wooden spikes that stick out of the walls, serving as permanent scaffolding and decoration.

Younger girls carry bowls and buckets  of water and mud from the river bed, and older women pound millet making pancakes,

Special meals are made by each family to celebrate the occasion. Proud of their architectural heritage the people of Djenne have long resisted paved roads and any introduction of electricity.

Only a handful of cars exist in Djenne belonging mostly to government officials that run development programmes for sustainability.

All new buildings and even the hospital are built in traditional style and technique binding the river mus with straw and grass

The building material is plentiful and cheap and the clay keeps houses cool, even with the scorching hot sun outside.

Labor for repairing is becoming a challenge in present day when most move into cities with computers, email, and television.

The architectural gem receives foreign aid to maintain its splendor and keep it the same, for another two decades and more!

Welcome!  #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

Cape town filmmaker, Kurt Orderson explored artistic expression in his early lifetime beginnings. After mastering crafts of his creations from his backyard in the Cape 'ghettos'(beyond Table Mountain),he ventured out into the world, rising up to becoming one of Africa's leading filmmakers.

Kurt initiated his career during his studies as a trainee at the SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), earning mere stipends for daily living expenses.

He defined his unique aesthetic voice and was soon acknowledged as a director and cinematographer on several key productions.

He founded his independent production company, “Azania Rizing”.

“Azania Rizing” is a tool for the African diaspora to rise up and map African legacies around the world on a global storytelling platform.

His major works include:

  •  Definition of Freedom, examining the role of  Hip Hop in South Africa. It was screened at the Toronto and Vancouver  hip-hop festival  winning the best documentary award at the Atlanta Hip hop film festival
  •  Tribute to Lucky Dube, the tribute to legendary reggae artist Lucky Dube was filmed in South Africa, London, and Jamaica. It was awarded the Best Documentary  Award at the  Silicon Valley African Film Festival in  2013.
  • The Pan-African Express, a journey of six young men, students from Atlanta who travel to  South Africa and trying to understand people living with  HIV and Aids. The film was funded by The Oprah Winfrey Foundation.
  • Eldorado, a feature chronicles the journey of four friends in a Gauteng township in South Africa. It won the Special mention South Africa Feature film at the  Durban International Film Festival in 2011
  •  Breathe Again,  features Derrick Orderson, a marginalized swimmer from the  Cape Flats who rose above his livelihood in an abnormal society of inhumane prejudice. It was screened at the Encounters film festival and Durban International Film Festival and several film festivals worldwide.
  • The Prodigal Son 
  • Visibly Invisible

“The Unseen Ones”

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds” Bob Marley

Current Projects

Not in My Neighborhood explores spatial violence, current gentrification and the post-apartheid era. It compares Cape Town , Johannesburg and New York uncovering the threads that exist between people that are miles apart.

 

Picture for the documentary Not in my Neighborhood. September 2016 – São Paulo – Brazil

#CreateoreneurAfrica – The Soul Journey of Kurt Orderson

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is ultimately the great history and achievements of Africa, and I guess also within a broad order global perspective is my people that inspire me and drive me. I am from South Africa, a very specific region in South Africa, Cape Town.

More specifically I am from a township from that is part of a strip of what would be known as the “ghettos”,  the Cape Flats, there is a rich history of storytelling, a great significance of the epicenter of what the foundation of the space, basically built on the legacy of apartheid. The legacy of architectural and apartheid spatial planning ideally separated people  (which was an actual policy with the group areas act ) that had a great significance of breaking up families, literally…… families scattered.

I think what maintains a traditional oral form of storytelling, obviously remained significant, it inspired my body of work ultimately that’s my drive, Africa’s history, Africa’s achievements. One is inspired by  Africa’s legacy, the epicenter of academia and  Timbuktoo…storytelling and the arts and crafts of storytelling ultimately started there and spread across the globe.

My true passion….well I am very passionate about just listening, sitting and listening to people telling stories, whether happy or sad,  ultimately passion for me personally, is driven by a deep desire of wanting to change the landscape of..change  how people perceive each other. I think it’s those stories of those people who done it in the past and are still doing it, that’s what drives my passion. I am inspired by their passion, I think I apply it to my life.That for me is what passion is. Passion goes deeper, the engine or driving force for one to do something. I think ultimately wanting to do something is ultimately passion…the driving force…

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

How did I find my passion….well that’s an interesting question? I think for me when I finished high school, I was definitely inspired by the visual medium and visual arts. There was obviously the influence of television and Hollywood tv,  I guess, but also my parents influenced me.

My father was a screen printer, which is ultimately a visual artist, although he didn’t call himself that, based on conditioning of the system that shaped him, apartheid South Africa. The idea that you were limited to do certain things when it comes to art black folks were deprived in a large historical moment of what the status quo says what you do and what you can become. My father is a strong reference to creating images and applying it to a t-shirt, applies similarly script to screen.

I think its an interesting analogy, metaphor for making films, taking a rich traditional medium and applying it to my work. I think that is how I found my passion.

How old was I?   I think my first reference to start noticing…I don’t know if I can say noticing, more where I picked up the idea that I was passionate about the visual medium, I think I was maybe thirteen years old or fourteen…..

I was locked out of my parent’s house, of course. That time there were no cellphones. I’m from a family of a family of five kids, my parents both worked, I was locked out one day.  I went to the backyard, my father had a workshop in the back of the yard, and I found a hammer and flat nose screwdriver.

I used the hammer and flat nose to carve out my name on a piece of wood and was quite impressed by myself. Wow, no one before that necessarily initiated anything like that. I wasn’t exposed to artistic expression and multiple forms of what artists do, I carved out my name, varnished it and made it immaculate. Later on meeting people who carved for a profession, creating amazing things. I always reference my first carving, that was my flame of inspiration for being an artist, use a visual medium for storytelling.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What about my passionate appeals to me the most… I guess the privilege to being a filmmaker, that being my passion but also to add to that, I feel very blessed to basically get paid for my passion, for my hobby… I would say …because we love film so much I  will do it for free, that’s how deep our passion for cinema lies…and getting paid to do something you love, your passion is a heavy blessing.

What appeals to me most is the idea of  shared history and shared knowledge, when someone allows you into their household to tell you their stories…. you being inspired and, relating on a level of  “oh I knew someone who had a similar idea about this or that .”

 I think that is what the driving force is …..sharing communal space, sharing narratives, sharing stories,  sharing politics, sharing knowledge….that for me a strong appeal to my passion…

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money out of my passion…well you know in real talk, not to romanticize the question too much. We, unfortunately, live in a very capitalist society, we inherited capitalism,, were born into a capitalistic society…..that on one level, right,, that reality of things, we need to eat right, we need to sustain ourselves… in terms of monetary exchange we apple or tomato,whatever……what well I just realised that my craft, my talent, my blessing, I can get paid for it.

For me, there was a strong driving force around craft, like crafting what is my voice, what is my aesthetic, what does Kurt bring across in a common sharing space as a filmmaker as a storyteller. It was first defining my voice, after defining that idea, that is when I felt to make money.

People  want to hire you, because they want that aesthetic that you ideally represent, that was my passion for making art and getting paid for my art, as an independent filmmaker, as an African filmmaker, things are rough out there…and we want to tell our own stories on our own terms, the system itself makes it very difficult for us to sustain ourselves. I need to work like a plumber who works with tools and I need to buy those tools. That is the reality of things

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

The first time I got paid for something… I can’t recall exactly when that was when that moment was…there was a few moment I think. I think  I worked on a television show and I was a contestant, but I also worked on a show. It was a show on SABC2, I was like 18 or 19.

We were trainees and there was a little  stipend that they paid us for traveling money or whatever. It was for generic work on set like organizing cables and assisting the floor, production. I remember very little , but that’s when I realised you can get paid for this. I was still studying at that time as well.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going. I have come through multiple crossroads moments asking myself is this really sustainable, what I do, filmmaking? Filmmaking is really hard, difficult, expensive artistic form to choose. A painter can get some canvas and some paints  make a  killer piece, get to an art market  for a million and boom there we go

For filmmakers, the reality of getting a camera, getting all the equipment you need, and then on top of it, getting a team to operate the tools, that’s a whole process on its own. These things are hard when you off the grid and not part of the mainstream in the system and don’t necessarily want to be part of it.

That’s a very conscious choice, you can just join tv and become a commissioning editor, produce for television and things will be different, it will be a completely different narrative, everything is there,, there is funding for you and they hire you.

Food, clothes and shelter have no politics.

Mutabaruka

As an independent filmmaker or producer, it is very difficult… I only recently mastered the art form of really raising money for my films, for many years my films were independent, self-funded at times.

Now its like I understand more about the industry, how to write the right proposals, and apply to the right people and getting the money and managing the money.

When you at the lowest moment at the crux, paying rent, paying teams, paying crews, and rejections. Rejection is a big thing for filmmakers , filmmakers are sensitive beings, we are fragile as well  in this…. broken world

These are all the challenges that come on your journey, it applies to life as well… life ain’t easy.  The world is not nice, the world is cruel, the life we find peace and sanity within ourselves, the people close to you. There are your therapists, they are your motivational speakers, they push you and say we believe in you, that’s what keeps me going.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 

What motivates me to be successful, what motivation every day. Whats the motivation?  I think this idea that, on one level is that  African history, African stories were for the longest time ever was told through the voice of the colonizer and the aesthetic and the lens of the colonizer…..

These were told in a biased fashion…for me now, as a fellow African filmmaker, it is our duty. I feel strongly for film to be part of the restoration process, the healing journey that we are experiencing and going through as black people across the globe and the trauma that we collectively experience.

How do we heal? What are the healing mechanisms? Now to be honest with you, we don’t have a clear answer to that question. I feel collective communal sharing through a  very powerful visual medium like television or film, then you can project to the rest of the world and share that and say in order for us to be this idea of one world and one shared history.

Everyone has to have the opportunity to share their stories through there own  POV or point of view,  I think that’s powerful ways of sharing. We all have common stories. We share a common history of people all over the world which ultimately makes us human.

Every generation blames the generation before them.

 

Racial ideas and ideology, culture and religion etcetera, are just all divisive mechanisms put in place for a form divide, rule and conquer….not to be cliched,  we have the same blood and all of that. I have transformed, transgressed that phase. I have passed that idea

Anger is fine. Anger is important. We have to be angry. We can’t all just hear  I am sorry and forgive right now,

What if I don’t want to forgive you right, now, and maybe  I want to make a film about that as part of the idea of forgiveness, as collective forgiveness.

That makes film become an interesting mechanism and medium, for multiple purposes. I feel,  personally, we can use film a methodology of social healing for healing the self and healing communities.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

What I have to say about all the people who doubted me…interesting question.  I always think about, one person comes to mind, a schoolteacher.

I wasn’t necessarily the greatest student, to be honest in high school.  I  probably could have done more. I was like, reckless and mischievous. I would say, I gave a lot of trouble.

Was I a rebel? Not sure, I don’t want to throw those words around. One teacher just didn’t like me. I was thinking about her the other day,

I think you always doubted me, I don’t think you ever believed in me, and now that my work is out there in the mainstream? I wonder if she saw my name out there. I wonder what she would think, after seeing what I had done.

I don’t want to reference people that doubted me.  I am not going to make a film for people. I make films am driven to or inspired to make. I don’t care about whether people agree with my standpoint, I love those who love me on the real level, beyond blood, blood relatives. My family is universal.  I am very blessed. We share this brokenness.As a broken people, we come together and we form this path of healing, the heal of our wounds….

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

What advice do I give to those aspiring creatives that look up to me?

The advice ideally would be to always use motivation. The idea of keeping it moving or just do it.  Life is about the idea of inspiring the other, inspiring other people. I think for me,  that is what life is about. Me inspiring other people and continuing the human change of inspiration.

One has to know your craft, know your blessing, identify your blessing.  But also knowing that this is a  very complicated world that we living in. There will be multiple stumbling blocks with a lot of us.  You carrying the torch, you carrying the great torch of your ancestors. You dont have a choice  , you have to keep that torch alight. That is the flame, the driving force, the fuel.

More important is to have a voice. Have a political voice. I don’t mean party politics.  Having a geopolitical view of the world and its complexities. An understanding of global politics. Deciphering the bullshit of what the news tells you, projecting that in your work. Be that change you ultimately want to see.

What you see is what you see. What you know is different

Mutabaruka

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Slavery is not African history. Slavery interrupted African history.

Mutabaruka

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

My venture continued. The final touches took an extraordinary connection – The Journey of my soul. My conversations with Tu Nokwe sparkled the final touches of #CreatepreneurAfrica.

An excerpt from the “Publication of the Millenium”, #Createpreneur Africa: Tu Nokwe- ‘The Light of Africa’

Meet our CreatePreneur™,Tu Nokwe,a legendary musician all the way from South Africa. 

Born and raised during the mainstream helms of the detrimental apartheid era into an artistic family that chose to soar above the pressing system and created Amajika.

This was a youth and child development arts organization to boost self-esteem and counteract the collating mental abuse that shattered mass populations emotionally.

 

We explore her breathtaking lifestyle, delving into the roots of soul inspiration as we explore her pathways, sharing her journey of self-discovery on a road of survival.

 

Tu Nokwe,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
My passion.My passion.Where do I start? We could end up with episodes of my true passions as they flow into so many channels. Well as you know, my outlet of expression is the creation of sounds and soothing soul rhythms, pulsating heartbeats in blissful melodies.

“I am creative, I am physical, and I am mental. I am emotional, but most of all I am a spiritual being having a human experience. That is just the beginning of the “Journey of My Soul”

How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I think I was born into it and grew up thriving in the presence all around me. My inner drive & determination fuelled me to learn to play the guitar without a guitar in my hands, but two chairs strung with wool from one chair to the other;using an old guitar tutor to position the fingers in cord formations and coordination. 

My career started when I was eighteen months old! In a commercial for a soap brand. I come from a family of musicians rooted in historical ingenuity of memorable creations.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
It is an outlet of soul expression. I explore the mantra

‘Order creates comfort’. Creative self-management is the core of my spirit as I share and display self-management tools leaving those around me invigorated with a soul-filled purpose.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
The gift of abundance is an asset, allowing open doors to explore. Positive affirmations to call on wealth is a stepping-stone to encounter all barriers in the most lucid times and delve into ‘The Light of Africa’, beaming promise of abundance. 

Africa is rooted in wealth despite the world image of poverty-stricken and downtrodden bereavement that is propagated and installed in the mass media. We are born on the soil rooted in wealth and treasures beyond human imagination. It is ours.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Every engagement was abundant on spiritual rewards. My first performance that brought in a cash flow was at the age of 18 at a wedding with the ‘Black Angels’, a local band. And then when I turned 13  at the annual jazz festival 'Milk Africa'(with the “Black Angels” - the Sneddon Theatre at the University of Natal in Kwa-Zulu Natal & the epic movie 'Shaka Zulu'. When I was 18, I earned a living doing African braids at a hair salon.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I launched the first African Diary - Journey of my Soul” over eight years. Initially it was my supportive tool for self-management. 

The project sparked off out of a concerned calling out from the lack of purpose and low self-esteem that brewed on a daily basis. My resilience to counteract all obstacles, keep focus and having my effective presence engraved in all souls I touched with my talent. I never gave up; I knew there were many doors open amongst the few that closed before me.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My mantra I never cease to chant is ‘Order creates comfort. I am a spiritual being and give thanks each day for all my blessings. The campus for my state of being is joy & happiness. Not everything may come to you at the time you desire it to. However, in Gods time, what is meant to be will be.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
All I can say to those who doubted me is advise them to rise above their fears and soar at rising heights. We all need somebody to lean on.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
“Journey of my Soul” was initially used by uprising performing artists in Amajika Youth and children arts under the auspices of the Nokwe Creative development foundation founded by my family. 

During 1976 when there was a need to boost, self esteem in the helm of the grueling apartheid System in my country. It became clear that as an artist my purpose was to devote time and energy to empower the children of Africa. 

I discovered that self-work had to begin with me. Once I had a holistic understanding of myself, I could reach out to others. My advice to aspiring creative’s is journey to define you and rediscover your LIFE purpose. If you follow my life story, my hope is that you will explore exercises and concepts to develop who you are. I wish you all the best with the ‘Journey of your Soul’

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

CreatePreneurAfrica@Cleng’a Ng’atigwa- Animation and traditional music in Tanzania

 

 

“Our seeds of creativity sprout out into roots that branch out into a world of knowledge, wisdom, and inspiration”. Cleng’a Ng’atigwa

Cleng’a Ng’atigwa, co-founder of leading animation kids series Ubongo kids and founder of JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAl,  is taking on the world by storm.

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
What drives me is to see positive changes and upliftment of lives around me. I believe my purpose in life is to instill a readiness for our new generation.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
My mum seeded my passion. I observed her praying for women and children in my childhood. Our task was to fetch water for elder women and assist them.
My mum was a positive inspiration to all around her.  When I was about eight years old, she sang to us and tell us folk tales. Every story had a linked song.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
My passion is my ultimate happiness. I get to meet new interesting people. I am naturally a creator of concepts. I create concepts that help others to learn and grow.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money is the greatest challenge I face. It took a long time for my creativity to eventually become an income stream. My focus has always been primarily on creativity.

It took a long to raise income through my passion because my thoughts were based on creativity rather than making money through it, that is a big challenge that I face.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Payments come in various forms. Some are indirect. Some are rewards of appreciation with low incentives. The first time I was paid a regular income was when I initiated a concept that became a huge success, Ubongo kids.
Mama Ndege
As co-founder of the animation project, Ubongokids, an educative cartoon series, I stepped into various roles. I was the art director, the main character, "Mama Ndege", was my conceptualization,and I played the character voiceover. 

I composed the main theme song "hisabati" and so many other songs for the seriess.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The quality of my services. Seeing the satisfaction my work creates for others around me. My biggest challenge is raising capital.

What keeps me going is motivating others and getting the support and motivation I need to go on. Stand by me and I stand by you.

Special guests like the legendary Tu Nokwe, all the way from South Africa endorsed the initiative and was our guest of honor at the JUU Afrikan festival in 2017.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I know success. I have seen the success of mere ideas becoming lifelong projects that triumph and uplift many. Knowing that makes me keep on going and striving to reach my goals.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I just wish them all the best and pray that they reach their goals and keep inspired. Those that condemn you do so just to uplift themselves when obstacles come in the way of their dreams
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
The journey of being a creative is no easy path ahead. Strive to do what incites your passion and you will reach you the pathway laid before you.

Welcome #exploremotherlandAfrica