Biodiverse Rich Coastal Forest in Tanzania: Pugu Hills

 

Pugu Forest reserve in the Pwani region of Tanzania is adjacent to the Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve.These forests are considered as the oldest in the world!

There is never a shortage of places to go outside of Dar es Salaam that will take at least four hours of driving, besides the beaches, of course…a great privilege for any city.

A coastal forest reserve situated 20km from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania might not be part of traditional tour routes in Tanzania, yet it attracts a fair number of visits.  Often visited by biologists, it is a  top forest in Africa for bird conservation.

 

A 20-minute drive from the Julius Nyerere airport, the main attractions include a sacred cave of the Zaramo people, a cattle market, and fascinating bat caves, the historical remains of Colonial times including a railway tunnel and  Kaolinite industry an off course, the forest.

 

Kaolin deposits of high quality lie below Pugu Hills in the Kisarawe district. These resources are untapped despite a growing demand worldwide. Local and foreign geologists have confirmed Kaolin deposits of  2.3 billion metric tonnes.

Biodiversity richness is high with a wide range of plants, birds, reptiles, insects, and birds.

There are about fourteen known endemic plants, two endemic mammal species, and an endemic subspecies of birds.  Wildlife includes Masaai giraffes, elephants, impalas, warthogs, Tanzanian cheetahs, Africa leopards, spotted hyenas, mongooses, elephant shrews, galagos, civets, side strapped and black back jackals, and over eighty species of birds as well as bat colonies dwelling in the caves.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

Mount Meru: Tanzania cultural tour expeditions- exploring Tengeru

 

Nearby picturesque Mount Meru slopes, the second highest peak in Tanzania, lies Tengeru, 13km from Arusha on the path to Moshi.

It is simply the best base to explore cultural attractions that make up the rich heritage of the Meru tribe in Tanzania.

There are farms, banana fields and traditional homesteads on the mountain. This village near Arusha is distinct in character.

The venture is set forth exploring old coffee farms with local production of the world’s popular beverage with and then canoe into a  volcanic lake at Mount Meru foothills, home to the best birdwatching and fishing sites.

Ready to give back to communities around Kilimanjaro? Volunteer programs are on offer at all local schools in the surrounds of Mount Kilimanjaro, venture out and discover development and upliftment projects in the Tengeru Community.

Tengeru Activities

Coffee Tour

One of the major highlights in Tengeru is enjoying special home-brewed coffee with the locals.

The coffee plantations in Tengeru journey leads curiosity ventures into local homes and lessons to prepare coffee. The tour offers specially harvested coffee from the Meru community on volcanic Mout Meru foothills.

Lake Duluti Safari Tours

A close view of vegetation in Tengeru with an abundance of fauna and flora at the lakeside. Learn about mystical Meru legends and mysteries linked to Lake Duluti. Get a front seat view of birds, monkeys, reptiles, many other animals, and plants.

This tour will give you an up-close view of Tengeru’s vegetation and you will able to admire the abundant lakeside fauna and flora. You can learn about the Meru legends linked to the lake and its mysteries while getting a front-row viewing of the monkeys, birds, reptiles and many other animals whilst learning about our plant life. A magical destination of authentic traditional roots.

Tengeru Market Tour

The colorful community market, interact live and eat amongst the locals. The busiest market days are Wednesdays and Saturday

Conservation programs in Tengeru

Environment programs in a land rich with vegetation. A source of survival. The main issue is deforestation threatening ecology and the community. Participate in environmental programmes and enjoy a luscious waterfalls tour relaxing in nature marvels

Forest Tours at Mount Meru

The second highest mountain in Tanzania m Mount Meru boasts beautiful forests. Unwind and enjoy magnificence. It is a great destination for preparing for Mount Kilimanjaro expeditions

Walk through the forests of Tanzania’s second-highest mountain.

"Mringaringa" Tour

A traditional gathering place, “Mringaringa”. Listen to the wisdom of thrilling Meru culture and traditional dancing. This venue is also used for settling disputes in the community with presiding Meru elders.

Local Food Preparation and Traditional Dances

Soul soothing music and food celebrations with traditional dancing guarantee a worthwhile experience.

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

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Our City of Clay in Africa – Djenne in Mali

 

A UNESCO world heritage site, the ancient town,Djenne in the heart of  Mali,stands on Africa's mighty River Niger. A city of mud houses, streets and city walls. The ochre mud composition gives out an embezzling monochrome look.

 

 

 

The journey to Djenne is like stepping into another era. Little has changed since its prosperous 14th and 15th-century heydays.

Djenne on the flood lands of the Bani and Niger rivers is about 220 miles south-west of Timbuktu. Before  1591, Djenné became a prosperous center of slave, ivory and gold trade. Known as the oldest city in Sub Sahara Africa,  famous for its Great Mosque and market.

It was founded around 800AD by merchants and flourished. The meeting place for Sudan desert traders and Guinea tropical forests, it became an impactful trading center and thrived due to its direct river connection with Timbuktu and the head of all trade routes leading to salt and gold mines.

Controlled by empires of Morrocan kings it expanded featuring products from the north and central Africa until the French occupied in in 1893.

Commercial functions were then taken over by Mopti town in the confluence of Bani and Niger rivers, in the northeast,  An agricultural trade center, Djenne boasts Muslim Architecture and a great mosque.

The great mosque built in 1905 is a classic Sahelian mud architecture.

The highlight of each year is an event when annually, the inhabitants of the town gather and refine the mud structure, giving it a new layer to replace what torrential rains fade out. The festival of plastering event: La Fete de crepissage. 

The labors of plasterers are accompanied with a beating of drums. The drums are perched on wooden spikes that stick out of the walls, serving as permanent scaffolding and decoration.

Younger girls carry bowls and buckets  of water and mud from the river bed, and older women pound millet making pancakes,

Special meals are made by each family to celebrate the occasion. Proud of their architectural heritage the people of Djenne have long resisted paved roads and any introduction of electricity.

Only a handful of cars exist in Djenne belonging mostly to government officials that run development programmes for sustainability.

All new buildings and even the hospital are built in traditional style and technique binding the river mus with straw and grass

The building material is plentiful and cheap and the clay keeps houses cool, even with the scorching hot sun outside.

Labor for repairing is becoming a challenge in present day when most move into cities with computers, email, and television.

The architectural gem receives foreign aid to maintain its splendor and keep it the same, for another two decades and more!

Welcome!  #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

Cape town filmmaker, Kurt Orderson explored artistic expression in his early lifetime beginnings. After mastering crafts of his creations from his backyard in the Cape 'ghettos'(beyond Table Mountain),he ventured out into the world, rising up to becoming one of Africa's leading filmmakers.

Kurt initiated his career during his studies as a trainee at the SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), earning mere stipends for daily living expenses.

He defined his unique aesthetic voice and was soon acknowledged as a director and cinematographer on several key productions.

He founded his independent production company, “Azania Rizing”.

“Azania Rizing” is a tool for the African diaspora to rise up and map African legacies around the world on a global storytelling platform.

His major works include:

  •  Definition of Freedom, examining the role of  Hip Hop in South Africa. It was screened at the Toronto and Vancouver  hip-hop festival  winning the best documentary award at the Atlanta Hip hop film festival
  •  Tribute to Lucky Dube, the tribute to legendary reggae artist Lucky Dube was filmed in South Africa, London, and Jamaica. It was awarded the Best Documentary  Award at the  Silicon Valley African Film Festival in  2013.
  • The Pan-African Express, a journey of six young men, students from Atlanta who travel to  South Africa and trying to understand people living with  HIV and Aids. The film was funded by The Oprah Winfrey Foundation.
  • Eldorado, a feature chronicles the journey of four friends in a Gauteng township in South Africa. It won the Special mention South Africa Feature film at the  Durban International Film Festival in 2011
  •  Breathe Again,  features Derrick Orderson, a marginalized swimmer from the  Cape Flats who rose above his livelihood in an abnormal society of inhumane prejudice. It was screened at the Encounters film festival and Durban International Film Festival and several film festivals worldwide.
  • The Prodigal Son 
  • Visibly Invisible

“The Unseen Ones”

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds” Bob Marley

Current Projects

Not in My Neighborhood explores spatial violence, current gentrification and the post-apartheid era. It compares Cape Town , Johannesburg and New York uncovering the threads that exist between people that are miles apart.

 

Picture for the documentary Not in my Neighborhood. September 2016 – São Paulo – Brazil

#CreateoreneurAfrica – The Soul Journey of Kurt Orderson

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is ultimately the great history and achievements of Africa, and I guess also within a broad order global perspective is my people that inspire me and drive me. I am from South Africa, a very specific region in South Africa, Cape Town.

More specifically I am from a township from that is part of a strip of what would be known as the “ghettos”,  the Cape Flats, there is a rich history of storytelling, a great significance of the epicenter of what the foundation of the space, basically built on the legacy of apartheid. The legacy of architectural and apartheid spatial planning ideally separated people  (which was an actual policy with the group areas act ) that had a great significance of breaking up families, literally…… families scattered.

I think what maintains a traditional oral form of storytelling, obviously remained significant, it inspired my body of work ultimately that’s my drive, Africa’s history, Africa’s achievements. One is inspired by  Africa’s legacy, the epicenter of academia and  Timbuktoo…storytelling and the arts and crafts of storytelling ultimately started there and spread across the globe.

My true passion….well I am very passionate about just listening, sitting and listening to people telling stories, whether happy or sad,  ultimately passion for me personally, is driven by a deep desire of wanting to change the landscape of..change  how people perceive each other. I think it’s those stories of those people who done it in the past and are still doing it, that’s what drives my passion. I am inspired by their passion, I think I apply it to my life.That for me is what passion is. Passion goes deeper, the engine or driving force for one to do something. I think ultimately wanting to do something is ultimately passion…the driving force…

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

How did I find my passion….well that’s an interesting question? I think for me when I finished high school, I was definitely inspired by the visual medium and visual arts. There was obviously the influence of television and Hollywood tv,  I guess, but also my parents influenced me.

My father was a screen printer, which is ultimately a visual artist, although he didn’t call himself that, based on conditioning of the system that shaped him, apartheid South Africa. The idea that you were limited to do certain things when it comes to art black folks were deprived in a large historical moment of what the status quo says what you do and what you can become. My father is a strong reference to creating images and applying it to a t-shirt, applies similarly script to screen.

I think its an interesting analogy, metaphor for making films, taking a rich traditional medium and applying it to my work. I think that is how I found my passion.

How old was I?   I think my first reference to start noticing…I don’t know if I can say noticing, more where I picked up the idea that I was passionate about the visual medium, I think I was maybe thirteen years old or fourteen…..

I was locked out of my parent’s house, of course. That time there were no cellphones. I’m from a family of a family of five kids, my parents both worked, I was locked out one day.  I went to the backyard, my father had a workshop in the back of the yard, and I found a hammer and flat nose screwdriver.

I used the hammer and flat nose to carve out my name on a piece of wood and was quite impressed by myself. Wow, no one before that necessarily initiated anything like that. I wasn’t exposed to artistic expression and multiple forms of what artists do, I carved out my name, varnished it and made it immaculate. Later on meeting people who carved for a profession, creating amazing things. I always reference my first carving, that was my flame of inspiration for being an artist, use a visual medium for storytelling.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What about my passionate appeals to me the most… I guess the privilege to being a filmmaker, that being my passion but also to add to that, I feel very blessed to basically get paid for my passion, for my hobby… I would say …because we love film so much I  will do it for free, that’s how deep our passion for cinema lies…and getting paid to do something you love, your passion is a heavy blessing.

What appeals to me most is the idea of  shared history and shared knowledge, when someone allows you into their household to tell you their stories…. you being inspired and, relating on a level of  “oh I knew someone who had a similar idea about this or that .”

 I think that is what the driving force is …..sharing communal space, sharing narratives, sharing stories,  sharing politics, sharing knowledge….that for me a strong appeal to my passion…

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money out of my passion…well you know in real talk, not to romanticize the question too much. We, unfortunately, live in a very capitalist society, we inherited capitalism,, were born into a capitalistic society…..that on one level, right,, that reality of things, we need to eat right, we need to sustain ourselves… in terms of monetary exchange we apple or tomato,whatever……what well I just realised that my craft, my talent, my blessing, I can get paid for it.

For me, there was a strong driving force around craft, like crafting what is my voice, what is my aesthetic, what does Kurt bring across in a common sharing space as a filmmaker as a storyteller. It was first defining my voice, after defining that idea, that is when I felt to make money.

People  want to hire you, because they want that aesthetic that you ideally represent, that was my passion for making art and getting paid for my art, as an independent filmmaker, as an African filmmaker, things are rough out there…and we want to tell our own stories on our own terms, the system itself makes it very difficult for us to sustain ourselves. I need to work like a plumber who works with tools and I need to buy those tools. That is the reality of things

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

The first time I got paid for something… I can’t recall exactly when that was when that moment was…there was a few moment I think. I think  I worked on a television show and I was a contestant, but I also worked on a show. It was a show on SABC2, I was like 18 or 19.

We were trainees and there was a little  stipend that they paid us for traveling money or whatever. It was for generic work on set like organizing cables and assisting the floor, production. I remember very little , but that’s when I realised you can get paid for this. I was still studying at that time as well.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going. I have come through multiple crossroads moments asking myself is this really sustainable, what I do, filmmaking? Filmmaking is really hard, difficult, expensive artistic form to choose. A painter can get some canvas and some paints  make a  killer piece, get to an art market  for a million and boom there we go

For filmmakers, the reality of getting a camera, getting all the equipment you need, and then on top of it, getting a team to operate the tools, that’s a whole process on its own. These things are hard when you off the grid and not part of the mainstream in the system and don’t necessarily want to be part of it.

That’s a very conscious choice, you can just join tv and become a commissioning editor, produce for television and things will be different, it will be a completely different narrative, everything is there,, there is funding for you and they hire you.

Food, clothes and shelter have no politics.

Mutabaruka

As an independent filmmaker or producer, it is very difficult… I only recently mastered the art form of really raising money for my films, for many years my films were independent, self-funded at times.

Now its like I understand more about the industry, how to write the right proposals, and apply to the right people and getting the money and managing the money.

When you at the lowest moment at the crux, paying rent, paying teams, paying crews, and rejections. Rejection is a big thing for filmmakers , filmmakers are sensitive beings, we are fragile as well  in this…. broken world

These are all the challenges that come on your journey, it applies to life as well… life ain’t easy.  The world is not nice, the world is cruel, the life we find peace and sanity within ourselves, the people close to you. There are your therapists, they are your motivational speakers, they push you and say we believe in you, that’s what keeps me going.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 

What motivates me to be successful, what motivation every day. Whats the motivation?  I think this idea that, on one level is that  African history, African stories were for the longest time ever was told through the voice of the colonizer and the aesthetic and the lens of the colonizer…..

These were told in a biased fashion…for me now, as a fellow African filmmaker, it is our duty. I feel strongly for film to be part of the restoration process, the healing journey that we are experiencing and going through as black people across the globe and the trauma that we collectively experience.

How do we heal? What are the healing mechanisms? Now to be honest with you, we don’t have a clear answer to that question. I feel collective communal sharing through a  very powerful visual medium like television or film, then you can project to the rest of the world and share that and say in order for us to be this idea of one world and one shared history.

Everyone has to have the opportunity to share their stories through there own  POV or point of view,  I think that’s powerful ways of sharing. We all have common stories. We share a common history of people all over the world which ultimately makes us human.

Every generation blames the generation before them.

 

Racial ideas and ideology, culture and religion etcetera, are just all divisive mechanisms put in place for a form divide, rule and conquer….not to be cliched,  we have the same blood and all of that. I have transformed, transgressed that phase. I have passed that idea

Anger is fine. Anger is important. We have to be angry. We can’t all just hear  I am sorry and forgive right now,

What if I don’t want to forgive you right, now, and maybe  I want to make a film about that as part of the idea of forgiveness, as collective forgiveness.

That makes film become an interesting mechanism and medium, for multiple purposes. I feel,  personally, we can use film a methodology of social healing for healing the self and healing communities.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

What I have to say about all the people who doubted me…interesting question.  I always think about, one person comes to mind, a schoolteacher.

I wasn’t necessarily the greatest student, to be honest in high school.  I  probably could have done more. I was like, reckless and mischievous. I would say, I gave a lot of trouble.

Was I a rebel? Not sure, I don’t want to throw those words around. One teacher just didn’t like me. I was thinking about her the other day,

I think you always doubted me, I don’t think you ever believed in me, and now that my work is out there in the mainstream? I wonder if she saw my name out there. I wonder what she would think, after seeing what I had done.

I don’t want to reference people that doubted me.  I am not going to make a film for people. I make films am driven to or inspired to make. I don’t care about whether people agree with my standpoint, I love those who love me on the real level, beyond blood, blood relatives. My family is universal.  I am very blessed. We share this brokenness.As a broken people, we come together and we form this path of healing, the heal of our wounds….

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

What advice do I give to those aspiring creatives that look up to me?

The advice ideally would be to always use motivation. The idea of keeping it moving or just do it.  Life is about the idea of inspiring the other, inspiring other people. I think for me,  that is what life is about. Me inspiring other people and continuing the human change of inspiration.

One has to know your craft, know your blessing, identify your blessing.  But also knowing that this is a  very complicated world that we living in. There will be multiple stumbling blocks with a lot of us.  You carrying the torch, you carrying the great torch of your ancestors. You dont have a choice  , you have to keep that torch alight. That is the flame, the driving force, the fuel.

More important is to have a voice. Have a political voice. I don’t mean party politics.  Having a geopolitical view of the world and its complexities. An understanding of global politics. Deciphering the bullshit of what the news tells you, projecting that in your work. Be that change you ultimately want to see.

What you see is what you see. What you know is different

Mutabaruka

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Slavery is not African history. Slavery interrupted African history.

Mutabaruka

“#CreatePreneurAfrica” – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

My venture continued. The final touches took an extraordinary connection – The Journey of my soul. My conversations with Tu Nokwe sparkled the final touches of #CreatepreneurAfrica.

An excerpt from the “Publication of the Millenium”, #Createpreneur Africa: Tu Nokwe- ‘The Light of Africa’

Meet our CreatePreneur™,Tu Nokwe,a legendary musician all the way from South Africa. 

Born and raised during the mainstream helms of the detrimental apartheid era into an artistic family that chose to soar above the pressing system and created Amajika.

This was a youth and child development arts organization to boost self-esteem and counteract the collating mental abuse that shattered mass populations emotionally.
We explore her breathtaking lifestyle, delving into the roots of soul inspiration as we explore her pathways, sharing her journey of self-discovery on a road of survival.

Tu Nokwe,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
My passion.My passion.Where do I start? We could end up with episodes of my true passions as they flow into so many channels. Well as you know, my outlet of expression is the creation of sounds and soothing soul rhythms, pulsating heartbeats in blissful melodies.

“I am creative, I am physical, and I am mental. I am emotional, but most of all I am a spiritual being having a human experience. That is just the beginning of the “Journey of My Soul”

How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I think I was born into it and grew up thriving in the presence all around me. My inner drive & determination fuelled me to learn to play the guitar without a guitar in my hands, but two chairs strung with wool from one chair to the other;using an old guitar tutor to position the fingers in cord formations and coordination. 

My career started when I was eighteen months old! In a commercial for a soap brand. I come from a family of musicians rooted in historical ingenuity of memorable creations.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
It is an outlet of soul expression. I explore the mantra

‘Order creates comfort’. Creative self-management is the core of my spirit as I share and display self-management tools leaving those around me invigorated with a soul-filled purpose.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
The gift of abundance is an asset, allowing open doors to explore. Positive affirmations to call on wealth is a stepping-stone to encounter all barriers in the most lucid times and delve into ‘The Light of Africa’, beaming promise of abundance. 

Africa is rooted in wealth despite the world image of poverty-stricken and downtrodden bereavement that is propagated and installed in the mass media. We are born on the soil rooted in wealth and treasures beyond human imagination. It is ours.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Every engagement was abundant on spiritual rewards. My first performance that brought in a cash flow was at the age of 18 at a wedding with the ‘Black Angels’, a local band. And then when I turned 13  at the annual jazz festival 'Milk Africa'(with the “Black Angels” - the Sneddon Theatre at the University of Natal in Kwa-Zulu Natal & the epic movie 'Shaka Zulu'. When I was 18, I earned a living doing African braids at a hair salon.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I launched the first African Diary - Journey of my Soul” over eight years. Initially it was my supportive tool for self-management. 

The project sparked off out of a concerned calling out from the lack of purpose and low self-esteem that brewed on a daily basis. My resilience to counteract all obstacles, keep focus and having my effective presence engraved in all souls I touched with my talent. I never gave up; I knew there were many doors open amongst the few that closed before me.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My mantra I never cease to chant is ‘Order creates comfort. I am a spiritual being and give thanks each day for all my blessings. The campus for my state of being is joy & happiness. Not everything may come to you at the time you desire it to. However, in Gods time, what is meant to be will be.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
All I can say to those who doubted me is advise them to rise above their fears and soar at rising heights. We all need somebody to lean on.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
“Journey of my Soul” was initially used by uprising performing artists in Amajika Youth and children arts under the auspices of the Nokwe Creative development foundation founded by my family. 

During 1976 when there was a need to boost, self esteem in the helm of the grueling apartheid System in my country. It became clear that as an artist my purpose was to devote time and energy to empower the children of Africa. 

I discovered that self-work had to begin with me. Once I had a holistic understanding of myself, I could reach out to others. My advice to aspiring creative’s is journey to define you and rediscover your LIFE purpose. If you follow my life story, my hope is that you will explore exercises and concepts to develop who you are. I wish you all the best with the ‘Journey of your Soul’

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

CreatePreneurAfrica@Cleng’a Ng’atigwa- Animation and traditional music in Tanzania

 

 

“Our seeds of creativity sprout out into roots that branch out into a world of knowledge, wisdom, and inspiration”. Cleng’a Ng’atigwa

Cleng’a Ng’atigwa, co-founder of leading animation kids series Ubongo kids and founder of JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAl,  is taking on the world by storm.

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
What drives me is to see positive changes and upliftment of lives around me. I believe my purpose in life is to instill a readiness for our new generation.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
My mum seeded my passion. I observed her praying for women and children in my childhood. Our task was to fetch water for elder women and assist them.
My mum was a positive inspiration to all around her.  When I was about eight years old, she sang to us and tell us folk tales. Every story had a linked song.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
My passion is my ultimate happiness. I get to meet new interesting people. I am naturally a creator of concepts. I create concepts that help others to learn and grow.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money is the greatest challenge I face. It took a long time for my creativity to eventually become an income stream. My focus has always been primarily on creativity.

It took a long to raise income through my passion because my thoughts were based on creativity rather than making money through it, that is a big challenge that I face.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Payments come in various forms. Some are indirect. Some are rewards of appreciation with low incentives. The first time I was paid a regular income was when I initiated a concept that became a huge success, Ubongo kids.
Mama Ndege
As co-founder of the animation project, Ubongokids, an educative cartoon series, I stepped into various roles. I was the art director, the main character, "Mama Ndege", was my conceptualization,and I played the character voiceover. 

I composed the main theme song "hisabati" and so many other songs for the seriess.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The quality of my services. Seeing the satisfaction my work creates for others around me. My biggest challenge is raising capital.

What keeps me going is motivating others and getting the support and motivation I need to go on. Stand by me and I stand by you.

Special guests like the legendary Tu Nokwe, all the way from South Africa endorsed the initiative and was our guest of honor at the JUU Afrikan festival in 2017.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I know success. I have seen the success of mere ideas becoming lifelong projects that triumph and uplift many. Knowing that makes me keep on going and striving to reach my goals.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I just wish them all the best and pray that they reach their goals and keep inspired. Those that condemn you do so just to uplift themselves when obstacles come in the way of their dreams
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
The journey of being a creative is no easy path ahead. Strive to do what incites your passion and you will reach you the pathway laid before you.

Welcome #exploremotherlandAfrica

She runs “Calabash Storyteller” a township talent agency and her own clothing line. Her other activities are storytelling workshops for children and adults.

Calabash Storytellers is an NPO focused on creating dialogue through the arts, culture, and heritage. Township Talent is a business based on innovation design

Image may contain: 2 people, text

Her early studies in human rights at the University if the WesternCape and a drama diploma with the “New Africa Theatre Association”, led her into professional productions like “Romeo and Juliet” and “Dancing 2 patterns” at the Cape Baxter Theatre.

She has featured in international feature films, “The Final Solution” as well as “The Piano Player.” A household name, South Africa television has her featured in multiple shows.

Createpreneur Africa- Andrea Dondolo

Tell us what drives you?
The need to live a purpose driven life rather than just existing knowing that after each fall you must get up and get going bruises and all are just your own scars.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
Wow, I believe it always been there, all it took was alignment and opportunity so I guess as soon as I could reason and manage the conversation with my mind, heart and soul, I nailed it, To be exact, I guess at around 25.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The adrenaline and fear that fuels appeal to me.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money makes the world go round, if you make it while you doing what you love, you've nailed it.
When was the first time you got paid for your passion?
In the year 1999, it was a theatre show called "The Good heart" at Baxter theatre while finalizing my studies at New Africa Theatre Association.
What kept you going when you thought you were giving up?
My son and competitive spirit.
What motivates you every day to be more successful?
My son.
What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?
Well  my life is exactly that, my own, live yours and prosper, by the way, no one died and put you in charge of my life, live yours.
What advice do you give creatives who look up to you?
Just run your race and keep your focus on the ball......

 

 

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica. Soul words of wisdom, CreatepreneurAfrica

3 Island Escape Getaways in East Africa

Whether you’re looking for giant coconuts or giant tortoises,lush rainforests or cool highlands, wildlife or glowing coral reefs and crossroads cuisine, there is an island in East Africa to suit your taste and budget.

The East coast of Africa is blessed with stunning islands and warm Indian Ocean waters.

Some are sovereign nations, others are unknown secret destinies harboring fantastic natural and cultural treasures.

The palm-lined beaches and luxury resorts are only one aspect of the marvels East Africa island getaways in on the Indian Ocean can offer. There is much more than glossy travel brochures put out. The diverse island explorers and spice merchants have shaped the essence. Africa’s ocean-themed adventures have loads to offer travelers.

The ‘Melting Pot’ of  East Africa Islands

The complicated history of the culturally rich islands of East Africa comes from the strategic bases that they were for over 1000 years.

They served as trade routes between Europe, Arabian Peninsula, and the Indian subcontinent.

Omani traders and Portuguese sailors, merchants and colonials…. , all gravitated to farm sugar cane and spices, trading gold, ivory, and slaves.

This is evident in the 15th century Swahili Lamu ruins, the Shirazi heritage of Zanzibar and historical plantation homes. We see it in Creole cuisine in Mauritius.

The oldest settlement in Kenya is Lamu and shares much with Stonetown in Zanzibar.The muli stories of townhouses with balconies shading the narrow lanes filled with soul-inspired vendors selling delicacies, arts, and crafts in silver and wood.

1. Zanzibar

Tanzania has many adventurous crusades,from beaches, ruins, wildlif,the Mt Kilimanjaro summit and the island of Zanzibar

The age-old living traditions in Zanzibar are a soul rewarding experience.

 

 

Families in Zanzibar gather to snack and promenade in Forodhani Gardens during celebrations and special festive day.

Island Beach bumming and Diving Ventures

Budget-friendly diving on Zanzibar and Pemba offer rewarding dives. Accommodation is suited to budget travelers as well. Good quality in abundance is what you get in Nungwi, Kendwa,  Jambiani, and Paje. Public transport is easy to reach, along streets with delicious, plentiful food.

2. Comoros

Between Madagascar and Mozambique, the Comoros Archipelago has four islands in total. The three main ones that gained independence in 1975 are Grand Canmore, Anjouan, and Mohéli. The fourth one, Mayotte, is still under French rule.

Comoros Islands, a population descended from Malay, African and Arab immigrants.

The culture of Comoros is shaped by Portuguese explorers, Arab traders from Persia and Portugal as well as the French colonizers in the19th century.

An active East Africa volcano is located at the Grande Comore.It erupted in the year 2005 creating a desert landscape offset by turquoise seas and white beaches.

Mohéli island is a major turtle nesting site in East Africa, where you are guaranteed to view turtles.

To escape crowds an experience life at a slow pace plan a getaway to Comoros islands. There are pristine beaches, lush rainforests and beautiful reefs with a fascinating blend of Swahili and Arab culture.

3.Mauritius

The Mauritius archipelago comprises of

  • Mauritius
  • Rodrigues
  • Agaléga
  • St. Brandon.

Two other territories, Tromelin Island and the Chagos Archipelago  are claimed by Mauritius but disputes by Uk and France(1)

Mauritius, a world-class destination combines influences from Africa and Europe. It is famous for beach resorts with amazing coastal shores.

Scuba diving and deep-sea fishing are popular activities. The  forests on the island  provide habitat for the  endemic bird, plant and mammal species

With sophisticated cuisine, nightlife and fishing villages, Mauritius caters for every taste.

4.Seychelles

 

Seychelles is made up of 115 paradise islands it has a small population, is uncrowded.

The idyllic beaches, aquamarine waters offering excellent snorkeling and diving are tourist drawcards.

Rare wildlife range from pelagic seabirds to giant tortoises. The cuisine in Seychelles has a taste from Africa,  a tinge of Asian sensation topped with European settler influences.

The luxury resorts in Seychelles, make it famous for couples on honeymoon.

5. Madagascar

Madagascar located off the Mozambique coast is the fourth largest island in the world.  Boasting unique, fauna and flora, 90 % of the wildlife in Madagascar will not be found anywhere else.

 

 

The most famous are Lemurs.

The lush rainforests, giant baobabs, limestone karsts and isolated islets are a calling for visitors. Activities range from scuba diving to deep-sea fishing and hiking to whale-watching.

Welcome to the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar, an eco-tourism destination of note for all discerning explorers of world wonders. Dramatic peaks, primordial forests, stony deserts and extinct volcanoes.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

The other side of Table Mountain – Cape Town


Planning to travel in Africa?  The magnificent Table Mountain is a drawing card and the starting point is the infamous Cape Town for most… today we look over and behind Table Mountain.
Table Mountain

The perks of traveling to Africa are endless. Instead of scanning the game parks for rhino or setting off for a day sampling Cape chardonnays, take a  look at the other side.

The townships of Cape Town….. You inhale the roots of freedom, exhaling air of human rights, justice, and reconciliation. A flow from shebeens to sangomas, the emotional sensory vibe sets you sparkling off with a vivid social culture. Nothing is amiss as every township bubbles with its own unique story about its struggles and how it evolved and revolved to its current state.

A treasure in the center of Cape Town – Bo-Kaap

Bo-Kaap

Beyond the hustles and bustles, just beyond the city of Cape Town, you find Bo-Kaap.

The “Bo Kaap” is one of the most interesting parts of Cape Town culturally and historically. Colorful houses, steep cobbled streets, the muezzin’s calls to prayer, and children traditionally dressed for Madrassa add to this unique Cape experience. It is a multicultural area, tucked into the fold of signal hill. Use the cobblestoned streets as your guide and you will be lead into a lively suburb filled with brightly colored houses from the nineteenth and seventeenth century, shrines of Muslim saints, an abundance of beautiful Mosques, and the very first mosque that existed in South Africa.

Use the cobblestoned streets as you are lead into a lively suburb filled with brightly colored houses from the nineteenth and seventeenth century, shrines of Muslim saints, an abundance of beautiful Mosques, and the very first mosque that existed in South Africa.

The residents of Bo-Kaap are mostly descended from slaves who were imported to the Cape by the Dutch during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. They came from Africa, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, and Java Malaysia. Some of them were political exiles and convicts. They were known as “Cape Malays”, which is incorrect as most of Bo-Kaap’s residents are not entirely of Malaysian descent. Their many Indonesian traces of vocabulary in the dialect of Cape, for example, “trim-

They were known as “Cape Malays”, which is incorrect as most of BoKaap’s residents are not entirely of Malaysian descent. Their many Indonesian traces of vocabulary in the dialect of Cape, for example, “trim-makaasi” thank-you, as well as  “kanalah” please! There are also many words, which have also been substituted with Afrikaans.

Funnily enough, Afrikaans evolved as a language of its own through a simplification of Dutch so that the slaves could communicate with the Dutch and each other since they all came from different countries and cultures. Muslims were the first to write texts in Afrikaans.
Cape Carnival

Each year on the 2nd of January, the Bo-Kaap celebrates a big street party, the “Coon Carnival” in the center of town. It was originally introduced by the Muslim slaves who celebrated their only day off work in the whole year. Nowadays men, woman, and children march from the Grand Parade to the Green Point stadium, singing, and dancing.

 

Kramat

Kramats or Muslim Shrines are burial sites of Saints of Islam. Cape Town residents have for a number of generations paid their respects these Shrines. There are three Karamats in Bo Kaap, and Signal Hill behind BoKaap has two.

 

 

Bo-Kaap Museum

One of the oldest buildings in Wale Street 71 houses the “Bo-Kaap Museum”. It is necessary to see since it feels like your stepping back in time. Built in by Jan de Waal in 1768, the museum was originally the home of Abu Bakr Effendi, a well-known Turkish scholar and prominent leader in the Muslim community. He was brought here in the mid-19th century to help quell feuding between Muslim factions and is believed to have written one of the first books in Afrikaans. The house has been furnished to re-create the lifestyle of a typical Malay family in the 19th century within a national socio-political and cultural context. Look for works by artist Gregoire Boonzaire, who’s famous for capturing the chaos and charm of neighborhoods such as the Bo-Kaap and District Six.

The Dutch brought slaves that were skilled artisans, political exiles, artisans, religious leader’s famous scholars, and convicts too. Islam, who roots started in Saudi Arabia some 1400 years ago, was brought to the Cape in the 1700’s. Skills and talents passed down from generation to generation accompanied these slaves. Not only skilled artisan but also superb cooks and cuisines blossomed. The Cape Malay Cuisine is not only delicious but also unique and has played a huge role in South African dishes.

A township tour can be one of the most illuminating and life-affirming experiences you will ever have.

 

More about expeditions in Madagascar

Fast Fascinating Facts about Madagascar

  • Rainforests and the incredible animals.

Parc National de L’Isalo is one of the country’s most spectacular regions, perfect for overnight hikes, rock-hopping along cool canyons and spotting lemurs.  It’s best to visit during the cooler months (April to October) when the bizarre patchy podiums and periwinkles are in flower on the rock faces and walking is more comfortable.

“Parc national de l’Isalo”
  • Tribute to Ancestors

The Sakalava people used to bury their dead in caves high up on cliff faces. Spread across 152,000 hectares, the Tsingy de Bemaraha Strict Nature Reserve has amazing forests, lakes and mangrove swamps, home to a variety of rare and endangered birds and lemurs. With gorges, rivers, and Ancient cemeteries Tsingyis a must visit.

 

Madagascar People
But Madagascar isn't all just animals and conservation.  
  • Madagascar Soul History

There’s a lot of history going on down as well. Ambohimanga is one of the summer palaces of the old Malagasy royal family. Antananarivo, or Tana, has a distinctively French flavor: The city is built on three levels.

 

Dominating the city is the Queen’s Palace and associated Royal Village or Rova. Now a national monument, it was once the residence of the Merina Dynasty which, in the 19th century, united all Madagascar for the first time.

There are the museums d’Andafiavaratra and the archaeology museum. On the lowest level is the market said to bee the second-largest in the world. The birthplace of the Malagasy state. Ambohimanga is known as ‘the blue city’, ‘the holy city’ and ‘the forbidden city’. The citadel was an important Merina stronghold and its main gate is an enormous stone disc; 40 men were needed to roll it into position.

Madagascar Museums

Or else you can check out the old pirate colony island of Ile St Marie. Its dense vegetation and the difficulty of navigating the lagoons which surround it made it an ideal base for pirates and, later, a colony for convicts.

There are many clove plantations and several historic sites, including Madagascar’s oldest Catholic church. It’s the perfect destination for those who just want to relax.  You can snorkel, sunbathe and overindulge on coconut rum punches.

  • Feel and Taste Madagascar

Buy cinnamon, vanilla and coconut oil from the local children, sip fiery ti-punch and sample the most delicious freshly-caught seafood or sit under a palm tree on a white sandy beach. There’s whale-watching in July and August, and the amazing spiny forest along the road just north of Mangilly is well worth a look.With coral reefs just offshore, sea breezes whispering in the casuarina trees and a relaxed tropical ambiance, who wants to go home?

Malagasy soothing tunes (myspace.com/tambatra) by our  conttributor glamorous soul sister from Madagascar  (myspace.com/tambatra myspace.com/tambatra1)

Getting around Madagascar

Check this out. Air Madagascar, serves numerous destinations throughout the country, which is a good thing considering that many roads have huge potholes and are impassable in the rainy season. Flights are still relatively inexpensive and they offer a 50% discount on domestic flights to passengers using the airline to travel to Madagascar.

The taxi-be, which is quick and comfortable, and the bush taxi, which is cheaper, slower, makes more stops and generally operates on cross-country routes. Fares should be agreed in advance. It is a flat fee. Alternatively, you can go via bus bonus a flat rate is charged irrespective of the distance traveled. Alternatively, take the House-pousse – the rickshaw.

If you are feeling adventurous, you can grab a stagecoach. A few covered wagons continue to take passengers. Otherwise, you can hire a car or motorbike. You will need a national driving license, and remember they drive on the right-hand side.

Or you can catch a train! Only if you have a lot of time. The Malagasy railway network dates from the colonial period, so breakdowns are frequent, a line may be closed for several weeks.

However, there is nothing to beat messing around in boats. Madagascar has a strong maritime tradition. Ferries sail between the islands. You can travel between coastal villages in dugout canoes known as Pirogues or Lakana. You can also hire Dhows and larger cargo boats.

And if you want to bareboat, a “guide” is usually included in the price of the yacht charter. He will cook, guide you, and protect the boat. A yacht charter to Madagascar is a bit of a “Robinson Crusoe” adventure. Once you embark, you cannot provision again and must live off the fish and seafood you will catch for yourself (or with your guide). So get a good one.

Madagascar is a great place to tour by bike and staying in small towns and villages along the way gives a real sense of what the country is all about. A mountain bike or heavy-duty tourer at least is required as the roads can be in poor to terrible condition.

Generally, there is little to no traffic, which makes cruising a great escapade. The people are amazingly friendly and you will be greeted with crowds of children shouting ‘Vazaha’. There are little or no facilities for cyclists, so be prepared to camp rough (ask if it is somebody’s land and never too near a family grave) or sleep in very basic guesthouses. Though you will generally be invited to stay in people’s houses. Bring a spare tire, puncture kit, chain, brake/gear cable, derailleur, and all the tools you need.

Remember that the law is that the ‘tour’ operators have to have a contract with you with all the details on it including the route. The police do check on this and it protects the tourists.

All visitors must have visas, except for citizens of some African countries. Proof of return ticket is required otherwise a deposit must be paid before arriving in Madagascar, which is equivalent to the cost of a flight to the country of origin. And if you come from Africa, you must have a yellow fever vaccination certificate.

  • Fast Facts 

  • Currency -Malagasy Ariary (MGA) Us dollars needs to be declared on arrival. There are currency restrictions
  • Electrical Power is 127V/220V, RUNNING AT 50Hz.
  • Languages Spoken : Malagasy, French, English
  • Time Zones – GMT/UTC +3:
  • Country Dialing Code +261:
  • Hot and subtropical climate, colder in the mountains.
  • Rainy season: November to March.
  • Dry season: April to October.
  • Monsoon season is December to March.
.. And when you've had 16 tracks of Malagasy hospitality, the last thing you'll be feeling is lonely - except perhaps when you arrive back home.

 

Madagascar Food and Music for the Soul


Madagascar Food

Burnt the rice? No problem. One common Madagascar dish is Ranon ‘apango or rano vda. Burnt rice water.

Malagasy cooks double the quantity of rice they need for the meal.  When it’s cooked, they remove most of the rice from the earthenware pan. The remainder (a layer about 1/2-inch thick) is heated until it’s burnt. Then pour boiling water over the rice. Cool, strain and chill.

Language

The majority of people don’t speak English, so brush up on your French which is the second official language of Madagascar. Otherwise it’s Malagasy all the way.

The main Malagasy phrases

Madagascar Music and Dance

 

The beauty of traveling in Madagascar is that you’re never sure what you’re going to hear next. The Madagascar music experience is like Forrest Gump’s ‘box of choc-o-lates’: you never know what you’re gonna get. Music is ubiquitous: The national music scene is booming, with artists from all the major regions turning out serious volumes of quality material. But locals retain a fondness for the usual African favorites: reggae, rap, chart hits, French pop, gospel, music, heavy metal, jazz and reggae Congolese

MUSIC BY LALAH RAINDIMBY OUR MARVELOUS MADAGASCAR CONTRIBUTOR:
https://myspace.com/tambatra
https://myspace.com/tambatra1

The national Madagascar music scene is booming, with artists from with  volumes of material of  striking quality

The Madagascar music experience is like Forrest Gump’s ‘box of choc-o-lates’: you never know what you’re gonna get.

But locals retain a fondness for the usual African favourites: reggae, rap, chart hits, French pop, gospel, music, heavy metal, jazz and reggae Congolese Lingala and good ol’ country music.

Africa’s biggest homegrown reggae superstar, Lucky Dube is even bigger here than the godfather Bob Marley himself.

The best thing to come out of Madagascar since the lemur is the music. Malagasy music rocks. the rhythms are tight. They combine virtuoso traditional music,  tight harmonies, buoyant grooves, infectious melodies, wild instruments, energetic dancing along with challenging, controversial subjects with the energy of punk rock. Malagasy hip hop broke into the mainstream in the mid-nineties and has skyrocketed.

MALAGASY MUSIC

 

Like the Salegy – a funky, tight, energetic form of dance music dominated by ringing electric guitars. In the kind of touristy clubs where the girls are cheaper than the beer. You’ll find out just how much the Malagasy love to dance. If you’re not a rug-cutter yourself, sit back with a Three Horse Beer and watch all the girls line up and bust their moves in front of the mirror (yes, every club has at least one). And then, just when you think you’ve got a handle on ‘Gasy

If you’re not a rug-cutter yourself, sit back with a Three Horse Beer and watch all the girls line up and bust their moves in front of the mirror (yes, every club has at least one). And then, just when you think you’ve got a handle on ‘Gasy clublife… Glenn Miller – ‘In The Mood’…this happens.in absolutely any club, anywhere in the country, you can guarantee that at some point the music will suddenly segue into jazz dance and the whole crowd will burst into energetic and clearly practiced swing and rock ‘n’ roll routines. Learn a few steps and you’ll probably make friends for life.

And the music isn’t just music.  It’s got a big history of political power. Hiragasy troupes were used during the French colonial administration to communicate decrees. Now musos like superstar Rossy’s 1995 song “Lera.”, mobilizes popular support for political efforts.

Malagasy revere ancestors, and ignoring the dead could bring bad luck. Someone who refuses to turn the ancestors denies his identity as a Malagasy. And if the ancestors can intercede with the Creator to bless the living with wealth, health, and happiness or, if mistreated, curse them with unemployment, disease, and misery. People lead good lives so that they, too, will be honored as ancestors some day.

In some famadihanas (funeral traditions), the families take the bodies on a stroll through town, to show the ancestors what is new, and introduce them to children born since they left the tomb. The thinking is that, to help the living, the dead must be familiar with their lives.

Famadihana

Welcome to Africa :  #EXPLOREMOTHERLANDAFRICA

Special thank you to  Freeway  Tours SADC Team: Thandi Brewer, Julie Hall, Jerry  Mofokeng (Freeway), Leslie Fong,( SPY) Lalah Raindimby, and MoMo Matsunyane (PADKOS),  Neo Matsunyane , Sonto Nhlapo, Alex Mamacos, Makgomotho Ngwasheng, Babalo Mpoyiya

In Memory of W.G Robertson

ONLY IN TANZANIA! PART ONE: Why choose Tanzania as a travel destination?

Recently in a conversation with an eager traveler on the lookout for the best Safari, I was asked, why Tanzania?  A good Safari is just that, anywhere. I could not answer him. It was not a single line answer for a short conversation.  I thought about it for several days........What will you get 'Only in Tanzania'. What are the unique aspects of Tanzania?

Why travel to Tanzania?


Why choose to safari in Tanzania? Well, it is the beginning of creation?

Why ? I embarked on a journey to gather myriads of reasons. And there are much more. An eternal series.

There is so much unique to ‘just Tanzania’. We have birds, trees, fish, mammals and even butterflies that you will see only in Tanzania!

Let’s talk about Tanzania.

As I clearly spelt out in ‘Exploring the splendor of Tanzania’, my echo continues ………….

‘Journey into all dimensions delving into the mystics and wonders of the heart of ‘Motherland Africa’: Tanzania

On a general  fact and  figures note :
We have the mainland, previously known as  ‘Tanganyika’  just after Independence when it merged with Zanzibar and became known as Tanzania.
  • Tanzania, the mainland together with the island of Pemba and Zanzibar cover  945,200 sq.km.
  • The agricultural country Tanzania has 40 million hectares of arable land
  •  It is abundant in natural resources including minerals, flora, and fauna.
  • The Ngorongoro Crater (3,647 meters) is  the largest in the entire world and has the largest concentration of animal species
  • Lake Tanganyika is second deepest and  the longest and second deepest lake in the world
  • Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa
  •  Lake Victoria the second largest lake in the world.
  • There are also other lakes such as Lake Nyasa, Lake Rukwa, Lake Eyas and Lake Natron that pieces up the inland water to 60,000 sq.km
  • Tanzania has  coastal line of that is unbroken for approximately 800 kilometers. The ideal beach getaway.
  • Tanzania portions part of biodiversity spots:

  • the Coastal Forests of Eastern Africa(CEPF)
  • Eastern Afromontane (CEPF)
  • The Eastern Arc Forests (WWF)
  • aCoastal East Africa (FEOW)
  • World’s three richest lakes for endemic freshwater fish species

  • Lake Victoria (FEOW)
  • Lake Tanganyika(FEOW)
  • Lake Malawi (FEOW).
Lake Victoria

All you can find in Tanzania and nowhere else!

citizen report announced that 27  new endemic species of animals were discovered, exclusive to Tanzania. Not anywhere else in the world but in Tanzania’s the Eastern Arc Mountains.

The biological potential was an instant qualification to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

Scientists from the Italian Science Museum advocating range inclusion in the Unesco list spent an entire decade surveying the mountains in Tanzania. Twenty-seven  vertebrate species were found in the forests new to  science and fourteen other species discovered that were unknown before

UdzungwaMountains forests in the south-central of Tanzania,  researchers found a multitude species whose confined to the Eastern Arc mountain range,  A curious chameleon species was of three newly discovered reptiles belonging to genus Kinyongia. A Mahege Mountains discovery.

The geologically ancient mountains and forests persistence of forests for millions of years result in extraordinary living forms.

It is an important site existing in Africa for vertebrate forms. Some of these species are one hundred million years old and are evidence of forest stability and unique evolutionary history of the mountains.

Red Colobus Monkey

We have a list of mammal and tree species endemic to Tanzania, and probably much more will be discovered.

Explore Motherland Africa – Tanzania will continue posts in the  ‘ Only in Tanzania’  stream in a discovery of all the unique features in the heart of The Motherland -Tanzania!

Tanzania butterfly

 

 

 

 

Getting ready for a backpacking venture in Tanzania

With its natural landscapes of wonder,the blessed land of Tanzania is one unforgettable destination to set foot on in the world. 




It is not extremely expensive, but there is so much to do. This leaves you yearning to experience all you can, that can leave your wallets undernourished and the magnetism will leave you craving to come back.

Get Budget Wise in a Smart sense

 

The Venture to Travel Africa – Tanzania

A ‘must have’ trip to Tanzania can include mountain climbing, safaris, city bustling excitement and beach relax escapades. The ideal backpacking trip venture can include reaching the highest summit to the wilderness of Serengeti in the north until chimpanzees at the Gombe national park in the west.

The Tanzanian journey for most and many begin in the city of Dar-es-Salaam, the capital of Tanzania, a natural start for a tour around  Tanzania.

It is a fascinating mixture of cultures. Dar-es-Salaam is a compelling insight into city life in Africa.  The Kariakoo market is jam-packed with an allure of remarkable food and exotic products. Dance and nightclub joints leave you thumping to East African beats of Tanzania

There are cities in the north and the south of Dar-es-Salaam where you find camping and beach relaxation points. It is recommended to get in tune with Tanzania in the city a few days before jetting off to the natural wonders beyond the buzzing city life.

Trekking and Wildlife in Tanzania- The North

The essence of a  travel in Africa is an experience of rich unique nature and wildlife.  The northern side is where Mount Kilimanjaro the highest summit in Africa is located and amazing sightings along the way. A week can be dedicated to climbing the mountain.  On route up, there are cabins and camps to spend nights and rest. It is possible to climb Kilimanjaro at any fitness or temperature level. Reaching the top can be tedious but exhilarating!

Safari in Tanzania

We have ample opportunities in Northern Tanzania to experience fascinating wildlife on a safari tour. There are alternatives to the known and most visited parks like Serengeti National Park. One is the Arusha National Park, between Mount Meru and Kilimanjaro.

Arusha National Park has a wide variety of flora and fauna that differs from the Serengeti National Park. It has savannah, marshes, and forests. The highlights include the  Ngurdoto Crater,  Mount Meru and  Momela Lakes.

Mount Meru is the alternative to climbing Kilimanjaro. A unique opportunity to explore abundant wildlife. There are buffaloes, elephants, zebras,  antelopes, monkey and bird types and leopards too.

There is a wide range of Safari options including the Lake Manyara National Park. The park has teeming hippos and gains its fame for masses of flamingos.

Another highlight is tree climbing lions. Spend a  tent night camp and the evening can be spent absorbing and reflecting on the mesmerising day experiences and watch the sunset in a backdrop of huge baobab trees.

If you decide to travel through the west of Tanzania, chimpanzees in Gombe are the highlight in the Gombe Stream National Park. The park is near the border of Burundi near the Tanganyika lake and the only pathway there is a boat ride to the deepest Africa continent endeavor.

Jane Goodall researched chimp behavior in Tanzania since 1960.  Chimpanzee sightings are special experiences. Baboons and monkey sightings, as well as approximately 200 bird species, can be possible in Gombe. There are many options of accommodation in lodges and lakeside camps or the permanent campsites.

The Remote Wild of Tanzania: Kalambo and Katavi

Close by Lake Tanganyika next to the Zambia border is the Kalambo waterfalls. These are the second highest in Africa, 235 m tall.  Visit Kalambo in conjunction with a trip to the Katavi National Park. The least visited because of it so so remote. Great opportunities to see wildlife. Katavi, a river delta has may elephants, hippos, and crocodiles

Serengeti

The highlights include the mesmerizing annual migration of the wildebeests in Serengeti. The south Serengeti and moving to northern Kenya as well as the Maasai Mara from about August to September. Safaris are in the range of $300 for about three or four days if you carefully plan.

Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro with its snow-capped peak is a drawing card on a note. Experts say that the top glacier with the iconic snowcap will melt away by 2020, so get a move on to experience the soon to be the extinct wonder! The costs are between $850 and 5000 depending mainly on your willingness to rough it up.

Zanzibar

Zanzibar, the spice island in the world apart from the mainland of Tanzania, it is a hidden Arabic alcove, and if you ignore the five-star hotels, you can experience the island that is forgotten by time. Blue waters and giant tortoises together with food markets to making your mouth water in a full moon party.

Ngorongoro Crater

Ngorongoro Crater has more animals than you can imagine. It is brutally something else. Even months can pass by in a heartbeat in Tanzania.

The Tanzania  Backpackers Budget

  •  $30 to  $40 per day  excluding Safaris and climbing Kilimanjaro
  • Food: expect to spend $4 for each meal on the street and about $ 3 to $5 at semi décor cafés. Accommodation ranges from $10 to $15 dollars per night
  • Transport: Buses are about  3 dollars for an hour of travel, but it is common for them to be late
  • Zanzibar is almost 100  percent Islamic and culturally sensitive with dress and behavior. The mainland is more of a mixture but cultural awareness remains key.

There is Visa and MasterCard ATMs  in most of the major towns and cities, visa is at $50 and are available when you land at the airports

Travel to Tanzania and start changing life and influencing others breaking free from to ‘real world’ padlocks in the wastelands that drown magnificence.

Geplaatst door Shabani Mpita op maandag 22 mei 2017

Reaching The Highest Point in Africa – Kilimanjaro

 

Kilimanjaro is the tallest and the most famous mountain in the continent of motherland  Africa.
Mount Kilimanjaro is in the north of Tanzania, located in the Kilimanjaro National Park.

tanzania-kilimanjaro

All About Kilimanjaro: The  Top of Africa

Kilimanjaro is a dormant volcano which has three separate volcanic cones, Mawenzi, Shira and Kibo, where the Uhuru summit is located.

Kibo is dormant but it is not extinct.  Three hundred and sixty years ago, the last eruption from Kibo occurred. Volcanic activity that occurred  two hundred years back and resulted in the ash pit (that is visible from the Uhuru Peak)

Hikers journey through five differing ecosystems – from alpine desert to rainforest right up to the arctic snowcap. Climbing 19,340 feet up is undoubtedly an empowering adventure of note.

 Approximately 35,000 people launch to climb each year. The number of people that actually reach the top of the summit remains an elusive statistic.

The “Kili” climbs can take between five and nine days, depending on the route you choose and the time you have for the mission and reach the altitude.

There is a total of  Kilimanjaro routes. Three routes from the south including, Machame, Marangu and Umbwe , two routes from the west – Lemosho and Shira, from the  North-East Rongai.  Another option is the Northern Circuit approaching from the with Lemosho as the starting point, and circles around the north  following a summit passage through Gilman’s Point.

The first successful Kilimanjaro expedition took place 125 years ago. In October 1889, mountain climbers on a mission to reach the peak conquered the Mount Kilimanjaro after forty years of previous attempts.

Mount Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa, the most iconic peak in the world.

 The Venture to Kilimanjaro

Snow capped and close to the equator, Mount Kilimanjaro attracts climbers from all over the globe. Reaching Africa’s highest point is a challenge many seek to undertake. Why?

It is Africa’s highest mountain and the world’s highest freestanding mountain.

Open plains rise up to touch soaring clouds with snow capped peaks at an elevation of 5895m.

Every ecological system existing in the world can be found on the mountain from tropical crops to cultivated slopes, lush forests n wild animals. Cactus like plantations, giant lobelia lies in above the forest. A saddle stretches between the Mawezi and Kobo peaks.

Cactus like plantations, giant lobelia lies in above the forest. A saddle stretches between the Mawezi and Kobo peaks.

The roof of Africa is a wonderland of magnificent beauty.

Kilimanjaro is an accessible summit. The Kobo peak can be reached without any special mountaineering equipment or climbing experience. A determination with proper clothing is all that is needed. The climb takes about six days with about five overnight stays in tents or mountain huts.
Gillman’s point is the lower peak on Kobo and Uhuru peak is the highest point. Spectacular glacier views and a wide crater.It is unforgettable triumph point expedition.

 Main tips to take note off.

  • Tourists need to register and climb with a licensed guide.
  • Kilimanjaro is not as easy as literature reads out. The trail is steep and sections are filled with boulders that are two foot high
  • Altitude sickness can affect the fittest.

Knowing all these tips many venture for the  climb again to make it to the absolute top of Kilimanjaro

If you ever make it take a Kilimanjaro expedition, it is the most beautiful place that you will ever reach. It is pushing

The clearest night sky and willowy grass and the second peak loom ominously and untouched as it is an impossible climb.

There is much more along the way to Uhuru. It is about pushing yourself to the limits to gorgeous views from Uhuru, the summit of the Kibo peak.  The entire climb takes you into another world.


  

 

Africa Aesthetic Vintage Design Wonders

Get the feel of Motherland Africa, right in your home

Homes are special spaces for all. From ecstatic regular travelers and ambitious wanderers to ‘stay at home’ enthusiasts, all will agree that there is no place like home with a feel,sense and touch of the magnificent continent,our Africa.

A few can reach their dreams in travels to explore the motherland  Africa and collect journey memoirs on the pathway.

 

There is a growing need to reach out for the best Africa aura of style and comfort in every home or living space.

Pablo Design Gallery

It should reflect the ultimate retreat, an outlet to peacefully cuddle into peace, embracing every savoring moment, after a long day in the out in the world.

Africa is vast sprawling all the way from Morroco and Egypt in the north to the Southern tip of Africa where the two oceans meet. Each country has a unique style. The common aspect is vibrant earth tones.

The common aspect is earth tones and vibrant color splashes. Decorating African theme homes have so many options available and identifying selections is crucial as it vibrates impact on the energy and feel of individual spaces.

The root of Africa décor is the inspiration from nature. Animal wood carvings and colorful fabrics express an appreciation of cultural history.

The African dream, the African inspiration is possible with timeless piece collections in your office or home.

Image result for africa carvings

Animals were and always will be a central theme in fabrics and artwork. Animals that appeal to interior designers are lions, elephants, zebras and leopards.

SCULPTURE

The possibilities are endless from carved napkin holders in animal shapes to rugs with zebra images. Black, brown, beige and white are neutral colors for walls and floors. African artwork or black and white animal photography conjures the energy and feel of virility, strength and power.

There are various textile options available from the motherland of Africa. Hand-painted batiks from Zimbabwe in tablecloths and pillowcases to placemats and table runners. Culturally rich and distinctive Mud cloth, handwoven from Mali.Wall hangings from depicting village lives. Wooden sculptures and Africa artefacts like masks, purses, pouches walking sticks and smoking pipes make decorative pieces.

Africa décor can take the form of tiling with terracotta or sandstone tiles. Concrete floors treated and stained are common in southern Africa and are cool in hot climates.

 

A home with a twist ethnic African design flair is not an impossible dream. Start with bookstores and visit museums that display Africa objects and textiles. Or travel to Africa and get an authentic feel.

Accent home-style pieces with an antique style create aesthetic living spaces with a unique hint of definition engraved from historic African root marvels. Stepping back into time in amazing energy of appreciation of creation and adds a unique touch and sense to homes.

Antique furniture from Africa has a unique appeal of richness to any home. The solid, sturdy construction define unique touch of splendor to every element of lifestyle space, be it in the form of kitchen cabinets, a dining room table, a home office desk or bedroom space and more.

 African antique furniture designs.

Africa vintage furniture adds to the realm of prideful ownership. The aura and style set forth an era of passion, embracing that “once upon a time” realm of authenticity and pureness in home décor.

Welcome. #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

Let us talk about the trees: Only in Tanzania

We have initiated the 'Only in Tanzania' series, an endless series. We described a few endemic mammal species from a list of many others and birds and bees get a mention too.
Now let's talk about the trees....

Trees of Tanzania

A safari in Tanzania is more than the amazing wildlife and animal sightings.

Tanzania has over one hundred different species of trees.

The most common trees encountered on a Safari trip are from the classic Acacia family of trees.

The Whistling Thorn

Wait a bit Acacia

Umbrella Tree

The Yellow Fever tree

Sausage Tree

Kigelia Africana
Kigelia -The Sausage Tree

The Serengeti houses these characteristically long trees with fruits that drop down and seeds are released. The 5kg  fruit may easily crush one, so better not to camp under as elephants come over for fruit supply as well! A local belief is that the fruit wards of whirlwinds if hung in huts.

Baobab Trees

Adansonia Digitata

The majestic baobab measures  40 feet wide and 60 feet long.The giant trees have a lifespan of a thousand years. Then new seeds sprouts for a brand new  thousand year lifestyle the stirring landscape.

The umbrella tree, the African bush symbol  is always photographed as a typical tree  African bush tree,  Ask any African bush enthusiasts about African bush trees they will most definitely mention the umbrella tree  envisioning a lone tree in a huge sunset.

Strangle Fig

Genus Ficus

In the initial stages of growth it is like a little vine-like plant climbing nearby large trees, then it thickens producing aerial roots and strangles the host tree, The bottom half of strange figs are twisted where it was initially attached to the host tree. The upper part is smooth. It is commonly found along Serengeti rivers

In the South of Lolliondo, we have a massive fig tree  “Tree Where Man was Born”. Ngorongoro, near Endulin we have the “Ancestor Tree” significant for the regional Maasai population.

Ngorongoro, near Endulen we have the “Ancestor Tree” significant for the regional Maasai population.

 

WILD DATE PALM

(Phoenix reclinata)
Phoenix Reclinata

These palms have leaves with unbranched parallel veins. Relatives of lilies, grasses orchids, and bananas. The most common palm trees are the native palm that occurs along swamps and rivers. The edible fruits are not tasty at all but the sugary sap is used for making palm wine. The palm tree shades have fragrance and a perfect for resting under.

CANDELABRA EUPHORBIA

 (Euphorbia candelabrum) 

 

These trees are common in the north and west parts of Serengeti. When they break, quite easily..they are filled with a toxic white latex

A single drop can burn skin. The tree was planted as cattle fencing to steer away predators who would keep away from the dense poisonous stems,

 

Bakchandi

COMMIPHORA AFRICANA

The Commiphora can be distinguished  Acacia tree species by the bluish yellow peeling papery bark.

The trees occur all over the Serengeti dominant of the eastern side, The roots, barks, and berries are used as local medicine for stomach and liver problems, colic in children and rashes. There are several Commiphora species in Serengeti

There are many medical uses like typhid fever treatments, it serves as stomach probelm remedy as well. The powdered bark mixed ina porridge cures malaria .The medica use of the resin is used for the sealing and disinfecting of wounds. Applied as a plaster ,it is used for spasms. Burnt resin is used as insecticide as well.
Uses of the wood, are soft but termite resistant. They are used for the contruction of houses ,beehives, tool handles and musical instruments as well.

The leaves, fruit, and roots are edible. Edible oil is extracted and incense is made from bark and dried sap.

 

The Yellow Fever Tree

Vachellia xanthophloea
Yellow Fever

The yellow fever tree is common in Lake Manyara . Early settlers knew malaria was common near areas where there was standing water but they blamed the Yellow Arcacia instead of the mosquitos, And that is how the name Yellow fever tree came about.

WHISTLING THORN

(Acacia drepanolobium) (Ant-galled Acacia)
whistling thorn tree

The hollow spheres ate the thorn base is filled with ants that bite. The ideal home for ants food supplies come from the special flowers called floral nectaries. There is an abundance of these trees in saturated soils

 

BALANITES (Desert Date)

Balanites EgyptianDesert Date
Balanites

The Balanites tree is commonly confused with Acacia trees. They can be identified by green thorns. A nut like a date that the tree produces is tasty both raw or roasted.

TOOTHBRUSH TREE

Salvadora persica
Toothbrush tree

The toothbrush tree is a low bush tree with long and arching shoots. These shoots when green is cut by locals for using as toothbrushes. They chew until it resembles commercial toothbrush, and then brush teeth spitting out wood fragments. Their smiles show a job well done.

 

Welcome

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

e.

 

 

 

MADAGASCAR AWAKENING AND ARISING- KOLOINA ZAZA

Koloina Zaza, Koloina Zaza. The melodious tune had an echoing effect , leaving a mind ringtone of peace and harmony in my soul.

I will never forget the day I crossed paths with the  KOLOINA ZAZA
(Nurturing Children) campaign.

It reached out to me on travels at so many getaways. I first came across a banner being held up on the streets of Madagascar. I never knew that the person I encountered and assisted in her endeavour to hold up the banner in the strong and persistent winds was none other than Lalah Arielle Lalah Razafimandimby and her sister Lanto Razafimandimby.

Their lyrics fuelled my soul. She told me that Koloina Zaza means nurturing children. She made me aware of the dire need in Madagascar to raise new generations.

Lalah Razafimandimby
Lanto Razafimandimby

 

Lalarintsoa Razafimandimby hails all the way from Madagascar. She is a keen traveller who took on a mission to bring change to the land of her origin.

She and has lived and travelled to all parts of the world igniting a sparkling awareness of her Malagasy roots Lalarintsoa is a vocal artist, with a talent she inherited from her late father, the legendary Malagasy singer Raindimby.

Lalah has used her skills as a stepping stone into the humanitarian deeds. Her calling to the Malagasy homeland was always rooted in uplifting Madagascar and triumphantly making a difference.

The vision of Koloina Zana was clear-cut, dealing with basic needs like daily health, keeping free from hunger. Furthermore, growth and development of education was the core for developing Madagascar to the deserved utmost.

Social ills that plagued society needed to be eradicated. The Koloina Zaza mission with a purpose launched.

The aim was larger than large. Skilled personnel. equipment suppliers and donors. education campaigns and social awareness of basic human rights

The larger than large mission was not impossible. Lalah joined in unison with Universal Human Rights Network a Washington-based NGO to launch a campaign to raise funds for the youth and children of Madagascar and overcoming the obstacles of hunger, homelessness, exploitation lack of access to education and healthcare, offering Hope to a new generation.

Universal Human Rights Network came on board of the Koloina Zaza programme working together with Malagasy citizens and their families.

The Koloina Zaza mission has launched. A call out to all volunteers, sponsors and fundraising outlets.

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

The Story Of Bagamoyo

Boats, Dowe, Shore, Beach, Ocean, Water
The winding road lined with palm trees in lush green pathways open up into the oldest town in Tanzania,"Bagamoyo", A UNESCO’s World Heritage Site, the rich cultural heritage of Bagamoyo is an unforgettable exploration discovery in Tanzania.
Strolling down the unpaved and narrow street of Bagamoyo takes you back into time. Way back into time.

In the 19th century, this was an important settlement on the coast of East Africa. It was a route that linked Lake Tanganyika to the sea. Ivory, copra, salt and slaves were offloaded here before being shipped to Zanzibar and everywhere else.
The history of Bagamoyo and the unhurried pace makes it an amazing excursion when in Tanzania.
 Bagamoyo dates back to 600-800BC, Bantu-speaking tribes, Kwere, Doe and Zigua lived here originating from the interior Azania. Hunting, fishing, and subsistence farming were the order of the day until family clusters from Persia disrupted in 1250 when they were attracted by fertile land and the multitude of fishing.
Bagamoyo – the Swahili rooted name Bwaga ambiguously meant to lay down. Moyo means ‘heart’ Bagamoyo was unburdening for traders and porters after lengthy journeys and a 'lay down' of hearts for those captured into a destination of heartbreaking slavery. The ambiguity of the name Bagamoyo allows both meanings.

 
The birthplace of Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete who served as president of the Democratic Republic of Tanzania, Bagamoyo lies about 70km from the capital of Dares-Salaam Little shops and art galleries line up the roadside. The tides slip in the coastal white sands.

 
 The oldest mosque, the ruined Kaole lies to the south-east of the town. A well-worn, old city with a population estimated at 30000, it is lined with historical architecture inspires by various designs.
On the Swahili coast that was once integral for a commercial network between Somalia and Southern Tanzania, it was the link between the interior of Africa and the world via the island of Zanzibar.

 


 

The once slave market has become the Bagamoyo Art market and is supports by the artist community in the town. Sun-kissed, dusty roads lead to a gallery where local artists who have transformed a wooden pavilion, a slave market of the past into an outdoor gallery featuring sculpture paintings and woodcarving. The gallery expresses a collective artist desire to link to a world economy, in the echoes of historic voices on every road corner.

 

Welcome to Bagamoyo! #ExploremotherlandAfrica                 

Tantalizing Tanzania Tastes

Many yearn to travel to Tanzania.There is way too much to do, climbing Kilimanjaro, kite surfing, quad exploring the vast national parks for wildlife, and landscape wonders.

And then there are the beaches. With all the action be sure that a healthy appetite will build up. A fine Tanzania cuisine and palate treat to savour on the ongoing adventure are sure to pass your way.

Here are a few ideas to splash into simmering into the adventure ahead when venturing to explore the heart of Motherland Africa in Tanzania or to re-experience treats after an escapade venture in Tanzania.

Let us start with a popular breakfast dish, Vitumbua. With a warm cup of ‘Chai’, you are sure to set off into an interesting day ahead with a start of taste bud sensations.


Vitumbua

1 cup – Rice Flour

4 tablespoons of plain flour

1 cup  Coconut milk

Teaspoon yeast

1 quarter cup sugar

1 teaspoon ground cardamom seeds

oil

Mix the rice flour, the plain flour, coconut milk and cardamom adding water slowly to thicken the paste. Cover upkeep in a warm area for about an hour until bubbles form on the top and the mixture has doubled in size.

Stir the batter and place in a Vitumbua pan

Give the batter a stirring placing a drop of oil in each section. Pour in a teaspoon of batter and flip until it browns on both sides.


Ndizi Kaanga (Fried Plantains)

8 Plantains

Lemon Juice

Butter

Nutmeg

Place the butter in a frying pan until melted. Cut the plantains into quarters. Dip in lemon juice and place on the heated pan until they are browned lightly.Sprinkle with some nutmeg

Wali wa Nazi (Rice cooked in Coconut Milk)

2 cups rice

1 and a half cup of coconut milk and 2 and a half cup water

1 teaspoon of salt

Add the coconut milk and water mixture into a saucepan with salt until it reaches boiling point, Add in the rice and lower the heat , cover and simmer for about half an hour. Serve alone or as an accompaniment

Chapatti

2 cups of flour

Warm water

Salt

1  onion chopped finely

Mix the flour salt and onion with hot water to make an elastic smooth dough and fold into a ball, Roll on a surface with flour and cook over medium heat in a frying pan and flip over once browned, The chapatti texture will be supple and soft once completed

Give your tastebuds a long deserved treat. Welcome #Explore Motherland Africa

Continue reading Tantalizing Tanzania Tastes

Malawi -The Warm Heart of Africa

Hundreds of miles of tropical golden sand beaches line this tideless inland sea. Relax in the sun on an uncrowded beach with long stretches of totally uninhabited golden sand lakeshore

Malawi's vast variety, overwhelming friendliness  great lake, wildlife, landscape and culture makes it an ideal getaway for families.

Formally known as Nyasaland, it's surrounded by Mozambique,Zambia, and Tanzania.

Malawi Flag

 


The initial western inception was when David Livingstone entered the shores in 1859. A British wiped out  slave trade in 1891.

For such a small country it has an unrivalled combination of Lake, Landscape and Wildlife. From rugged highlands to lowland plains, Malawi has an incredible variety of stunning landscapes.

The unique rolling hills of orchid-clad Nyika; the cool forested plateau of Zomba; the 10000 ft climbers’ paradise of Mulanje Massif; the broad and fertile Shire Valley.

Malawi means the “glitter of the sun rising across the lake”.  And this vast inland sea is what we think about when we think about Malawi.

Lake Malawi is the third-largest lake in Africa, the 10th largest in the world and covers 1/5th of Malawi. It’s sometimes called the Calendar Lake because it’s 365 miles long and 52 miles wide.

 

Or find out more about the country. Karonga has an interesting but turbulent history as a centre for the notorious nineteenth-century slave trade.

 

 

Now the town is the site of a new museum focused on both its cultural history and the recent archaeological finds of dinosaur and hominid bones.

At the top of the northerly point of the lake, you will find Nkhata Bay, that was reached by  David Livingstone. Its small sheltered harbour is a focus for the Lake’s fishing industry but it is also becoming increasingly important as a tourist centre.

Bandawe Mission was the place that Dr Robert Laws made the second attempt to establish a Livingstonia Mission. Like Cape Maclear, malaria took its toll and the missionaries moved further north to the present site on the Kondowe Plateau. The banked seating and  lateral sided pulpit of the church and missionary graves remain

 

Off the eastern shore of the Lake is Likoma Island: a small piece of Malawi in Mozambican waters. This is where the headquarters of Livingstone’s mission to Central Africa in the 1880s.  That’s why Malawi kept it when the Lake was divided politically after World War II. Likoma’s claim to fame is its cathedral (the size of Winchester’s) started in 1903. This vast building is a small piece of England in Africa, including stained glass and carved soapstone.

That’s why Malawi kept it when the Lake was divided politically after World War II. Likoma’s claim to fame is its cathedral (the size of Winchester’s) started in 1903. This vast building is a small piece of England in Africa, including stained glass and carved soapstone.

Visit the world’s first freshwater national park. Lake Malawi National Park, close to Monkey Bay, lies towards the southern extremity of the lake. The park includes a land area around the cape and bay as well as the Lake and islands up to 100 metres offshore. It’s also a world heritage site.

Snorkelling and scuba-diving are increasingly popular here because of the attraction of seeing the brilliantly coloured fish, the mbuna.

Lake Malawi contains more fish than any other lake in the world. Some of the rarest tropical fish in the world are unique to this vast lake. it has about 1000 species of fish. It’s is a true kaleidoscopic aquarium.

The countless thousands of freshwater fish, the mbuna, are more abundant and varied than anywhere else in the world and will feed directly from the hand.

Marine animals include two species of otter and occasional crocodiles.

Away from the lake, the park has baboons, klipspringer, bushbuck and vervet monkeys, antelope and hyrax, and, of course, there is a great variety of birdlife including fish eagles, kingfishers, cormorants and hamerkops. In the North the

In the North the lake is quite extraordinarily deep: 700m, plunging well below sea level. This reflects the enormity of the natural faulting of the Great Rift Valley which is the origin of the Lake itself.

Try out the range of watersports available along the length of Lake Malawi. Swimming, waterskiing, sailing and kayaking are all available along the extraordinarily clear lakeshore.

Because of its rich harvest of fish, the Lake plays an important part in the country’s economy. Fishing villages are scattered along the length of the lakeshore and you’re welcome to visit the traditional industry. Go fishing on the southern lakeshore north of Mangochi and at Senga Bay. There are opportunities to fish for yellow fish, lake salmon and lake tiger. Trout angling is easily arranged at Nyika Plateau or  Chelinda as well as Zomba Plateau.

Go fishing on the southern lakeshore north of Mangochi and at Senga Bay. There are opportunities to fish for yellow fish, lake salmon and lake tiger. Trout angling is easily arranged at Nyika Plateau or  Chelinda as well as Zomba Plateau.

Mumbo Island and Domwe Island camps offer idyllic island getaways. Malawi is an ideal destination not to be missed in Africa. #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

In Memory of Willian G Robertson. Special Thanks to the Freeway Tours Team, Julie Hall,Thandi Brewer,Leslie Fong,Jerry Mofokeng,Momo Matsunyane

WELCOME TO JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL

The Light Of Africa – Ready to Shine at the JUU Afrikan Festival,Tanzania2017

 

Travellers tell us about your experiences and recommendation

 

 

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

The Magical Blend of Madagascar Music ingredients

The Musical Vibe on our Big Island – Madagascar

Traditional music of Madagascar….Where do we begin to define it? We have the Austronesian influence on one side, and then Arab, African and European populations ingestion.

The variety makes it impossible to specify origin of  unique Madagascar tunes   that rhythmically echo on on for a millennium.

The internet has given the pathway for a refreshing and reawakening of Madagascar music.The sacred and secular music alleys may be the sounds of a ritual or even used for animating teenage games in villages.

The Kingdom era has evolved into current day modern applications of melody replacements and trending pop culture in the cities. The rhythm of Madagascar language is innovative tunes in versions from every direction in the Madagascar landscape.

Local artists in remote villages retain traditional rustic sounds. The music reflects the history of communities and is not strive for stardom. The cities have interposed rhythms on traditional genres and incorporated spectacular innovation in electronic sound.

The complex mosaic of Madagascar is made up of a 22million population with 18 ethnicities. There are six provinces.The culture and common language is spoken throughout the land and the term of ethnicity has been abandoned making way for ‘human group’ gathering in rhythmic unison.

The Sakalava dominated the West in music influence. The Merina in the central highlands and Betsimisaraka in the east mark rhythmic variations. Áfindrafindrao is an ancestral tune that was danced in quadrille adopted in the 19th century by Merina Kins and later influenced every part of the big island.

The strongest group in the South, the Antandroy, preserve musical tradition,  the contemporary musicians from this group are the most recognized groups internationally.

In the north, a special contribution was made to Madagascar traditional music by the Antahkarana.  The most festive part of Madagascar favoured by vegetation and the climate.

 

Madagascar musical footprints include the Tanala., Bestileo, Bezanozano, Bara, Masikoro, Tsimihety,  Antesaka, Sihanaka, Antemoro, Vezo, and a stream of others.

Traditional instruments

Valiha
Traditional music instruments are the Valiha (zither pipe) and marovany (box zither). These are the most played. It is a legacy of the Mlayo Polynesian heritage. 
Marovany

Rice seed filled rattles are next called kantsa, koritsa or korintsana depending on the region.

There are four main categories in traditional Madagascar music.  Aerophones, Idiophones, membranes and string.  The common basis for traditional singers and musicians come from the influence of European, Arabic, Africa, and Austronesian contribution.

Lutes,

Mandolins

Kabosy* box guitar

Sodina

Traditional ceremonies at ancestral ceremonies and possession rites are common. Music at funerals, marriages, circumcisions, initiation rites victories and pleasures are commemorated with traditional music where masses gather.
Lalah Raidimby

 

Malagasy soothing tunes (myspace.com/tambatra) by our contributor glamorous soul sister from Madagascar (myspace.com/tambatra myspace.com/tambatra1)

 

Traditional musicians in Madascar are self-taught, orally and by listening.

Malagasy music is filled with rhythms that rock. Combinations of traditional virtuoso music alight tight harmonies with buoyant grooves in infectious melodies. The wild instruments and energetic dancing along is a groove not to be missed. Malagasy hip hop entered and skyrocketed since mid-nineties and has skyrocketed.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

The Madagascar Fashion Style

Madagascar inhabitants are comprised of a combination of arrivals on the island almost 2000 years ago. They came from regions from all parts of the world like Arabia,India and the African continent.

These early settlers became the pioneers of Madagascar culture and society created an amalgamation of religion, culture and tradition.


Modern Madagascar is a perfect blend of traditionalism and modernism.


 Fashion in Madagascar

Malagasies take pride in style and appearance and fashion design is in a sense actually indigenous to the island of Madagascar.

Madagascar clothing is unique with spectacular designs and decorated with colourful and bright scenes of daily life.  The colours are created from natural dyes like roots, berries and bark. There is a proverb at the bottom of a “Lamba”

Lambas are made with yarn spun by hand from natural silk. The dyed yarn is hand woven and the silk used is indigenous to Madagascar.


 

 

Accessories and clothing are palettes for creativity. Every village and town in Madagascar have people sporting the most exquisite traditional garments along with some imported style.

 

 

Malagasy indigenous fashions are created from Raffia fabric and Lamba garment and raffia fabric and weave. Extraordinary and versatile made in various brilliant patterns and colours.

The Lamba can be a shirt, a wrap or trouser alternative, used as a baby sling or made into a dress in a moment, This garment is fundamental for women and men as well

The Lamba is traditional dress in Northern Madagascar, “Lamba means cloth but refers to matching fabrics around the waist and around shoulders. Is some sections the Lamba is usually worn by men as ceremonies like offerings and burials. Old men in rural areas on Madagascar plateau areas wear them more often. Unlike men, many women wear  Lamba at all occasions.

Traditional Lamba is used to brighten contemporary jackets and pants and as accessories to western style clothing.

A creative outer garment replaces sweaters or jackets and there is a wide variety to creates unique personal style. Malagasy decorative fashion has developed into the Kreole fashion scene. The Malagasy mix of creative indigenous fabrics blending in with accessories from neighbouring African countries and Eurasia.

The distinctive African flair in a Eurasian flavour. Malagasy designs are cutting edge fashion styles with a blending combination of Asian garments and European hairstyles.

Common in Villages: Hat ‘Satroka penjy” and Long shirt Malabary

 

Design and textile artists from Madagascar make a bold presence on the global fashion scene.

Madagascar design and textile artists shine out in the world of fashion making a bold trailblazing presence on global fashion and entertainment stage.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

Durban – The Zulu Kingdom in South Africa

  • Townships are the heartbeat of South Africa

The province of Kwa Zulu Natal provides opportunities to experience African culture in authentic first hand Zulu township and cultural tours.