#CreatepreneurAfrica ,South Africa’s Nena Tenacity, Content developer and Writer

 

 

Screenwriter,content developer and producer,Nena Tenacity has embraced a career in the creative sectors spanning over a decade and a half from humble early day beginnings to becoming 'The Çreator' _ a key content producer.

Her key interest is content and quality with information that expands knowledge and growth.

https://www.facebook.com/KirohoMtoto/

Initially, her inception into the film and television industry was on admin and crew tasks including the local ‘most watched’ South African soapieGenerations” , where she served as the director’s assistant

Thereafter several roles followed on various productions as a  production continuity supervisor.

Eventually, she became involved in research and proposal writing for television producers submitting educational programmes for broadcast content including ‘People of The South’,  a series that was hosted by Dali Tambo, a talk show celebrating key icons in South Africa.

Involved in multiple productions in key roles, eventually, her ongoing work reached fruition in 2008  when she produced a documentary “Dreaming the new” as well as a pilot on Madagascar on a completed 13-part docudrama series on tourism in the SADC region titled “Freeway Tours”.

Mam Dorothy Masuku, forever and always ,advisor, guide and role model

 

 

 

 

 

SEDIBA 2005 NFVF

Her first feature film “Stix and Stones”, a  feature social commentary film exploring the cycles of violence and poverty delving into her personal life realms was developed through National film and video foundation SEDIBA initiative, headed by the acclaimed screenwriting executive and mentor, Alby James. The rights were optioned by a South African production company  Ochre Media.

The rights to the film eventually reverted back to her when the production company that held rights changed management and operational structure.

She then ventured travelling with it to the Rotterdam film festival Babylon workshop and the film is currently on the market for possible production.

Her independent short film streams like ‘Struggles Continue’;  ‘Breaking the chains’ and ‘Strike a Dice’  received development funds during the initiation of the National Film and Video Foundation that was established in South Africa with a mission towards growth and development in the film and television industry.

This was her tool to launch her career forward in the development of several concepts including a series title ‘Let our voices be heard’films from women’s perspective.

She was on board of a development team for a series called ‘A true state of affairs that was a series reflecting migration issues in South Africa and raised xenophobia and other related issues.

Currently, she is on a mission to promote a new feature film  Úshujaa” : Mtoto wa kiroho kurudisha ulimwengu wetu 

#WARRIOR 
*spirit child taking back our earth, a language revolution film portraying

KISWAHILI is a liberating and uniting language across tribes and ethnicity. A Pan-African cause for our SOLIDARITY  to wipe away colonial supremacy of language   Sipho Mushwana

When a new spirit child is born with the ultimate Pan-African cause into an era of awakening, there is a calling to crumble the case and essence of the dominant based engraved world system...the English Language!

Key players on board include ‘Kiswahili Ambassadors’, Sipho Mushwana, Joseph Sarimbo as well as proudly Tanzania actor Kihaka GND as well as Neil Schell

Research and proposal preparation 

  • Eskia Mphalele Documentary
  • Dorothy Masuku Documentary
  • Women in Science Documentary

Her various role included a head researcher on ‘Wordart’ a series by Griffin Films celebrating South African writers and as a writer for Interrogation room a television series by Fremantle media.

Her other writing work included 15-minute films for Karlan Communications titled “Very Fast and not so furious “, a series reflecting film from the perspective of women

 

Producer

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica – #SHUJAA #WARRIOR #LANGUAGE REVOLUTIONIST Nena Tenacity

1.Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My passion…My passion is an outlet of expression, primarily through the tool of language and words

2. How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I can’t remember the exact age, but I always remember my key interest in writing and journaling continuously

3.What about your passion appeals to you the most?

I always thought of it as a regular everyday activity, like eating, drinking and sleeping. It is only in very recent years that I realised the power of words. A life skill of proportional weight

4.What drove you to make money from your passions?

When I learnt it was possible to get an income for spending your precious time in mind spaces that you prefer to.

5.When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

Tough one to answer! I guess payment was always there generally when people around you needed help with wording something or the other or preparing presentations, you would get rewarded in some way or the other. Actual money, my first memory is getting funded by the National Film and Video Foundation for developing my first short film ‘Let our voices be heard’, a short film speaking out against the exploitation and abuse of women.

6.What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

My self-will to battle against the odds and face trials and tribulations in the best manner I could. Other than those initiatives in the industry life the film foundation and many people including Alby James, Clarence Hamilton, Thandi Brewer, Julie Hall and a range of other key players in my personal and professional outlets

Akin Omotoso and Hakeem Kae Kazim, also played key role models in my stance to keep at it.

 7.What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I live by the motto of all and anything you want and desire is possible

8.What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Keep doubting. My precious time is not there to cater for counselling your ‘doubt’ condition

9.What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

All I can say is there will be falls, sometimes harder than others, but persist, keep the vision and endure being what you want to be. Nobody has to conform to fit within social expectations. Rise above and rise high.

 

 

Do not doubt: Women narrate the future! “Shining the light of literature in Africa”

Africa, the heartbeat of rhythmic narrative voices, the home of authentic root information, is on a mission to reshape its distorted, desecrated image. Words spark off like distant echoes healing scars inflicted by the wraths of colonialism.

From rhythmic poetry to reciting kings, the pulsating echo from the motherland of Africa in streams of African literature is rooted in oral tradition, moral values, cultural systems and laws that were passed on from wood fires in the villages spreading voices to be heard, passing through the rivers and mountains.


The Diverse Literature of Africa

Writers from the continent in the contemporary era bring a diverse perspective of the multifaceted and complex continent of Africa.

Wole Soyinka from Nigeria spread the wings of Africa literature awareness and development after claiming the Nobel prize in 1986. Magical extraordinaire from Africa followed with Ben Okri and ‘The Famished Road’. The enchanting tale from Africa in a magical tone of realism and claimed the poetic prose Booker prize in 1991.

Somalian novelist, Nuruddin Farah received the 1998 Neustadt Prize prize. Nigerian author emerged with ‘Measuring time’ and Mozambican Mia Couto’s lyrically delicious read  “The Last Flight of the Flamingo” took off in a magic realism masterpiece of note.

Sembene, Achebe, Hampâté Bâ, Kourouma, Marechera and Armah dominated the literary scene,  then came the flowing voices of women in Africa with Mariama Ba and Bessie Head who pioneered African feminism.

 The Literary Voice of Women from Africa

The last two and a half decades women writers came to the fore. From the classic ‘Nervous conditions” by Zimbabwean Tsitsi Dangaremba to  Cameroon’s Calixthe Beyal, showcased women from Africa that excel in literature.

Nervous Conditions -Tsitsi Dangaremba
Calixthe Beyala : La Plantation

 

Female writers came to the forefront like Fatou Diome, the acclaimed ‘The Belly of the Atlantic’ author.

The autobiographic ‘The Devil that Danced on the Water’ announced Aminatta Forna another great writer from the land of  Sierra Leone, home of Syl Cheney-Coker, an acclaimed poet.

A young girl from Nigeria, ‘Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’ made her debut on the literary scene taking the world by storm with ‘Purple Hibiscus’.  ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’ followed, an epic of the Nigerian civil war.

Amma Darko, a tax collector expanded her creativity in Africa’s expression in the linguistic field. She published (Der VerkaufteTraum) Beyond The Horizon

Amma Darko – Beyond the horizon

Monica Arac de Nyeako from Uganda claimed the 2007 Caine Prize.

The past ten years have seen the emergence of publishing houses and broadened our understanding of the savannah. The diverse narrative from Africa continues globe trotting.

The internet has widened pathways for authors to circumnavigate the traditional publishing house methods, earn revenue and create online fans. EC Osunde proved this after winning the 2009 Caine Prize for initially published on Guernicamag.com.

The Caine Prize has provided a recognition for African writing in an annual platform to ensure the development of writing on the continent.

Binyavanga Wainaina, after winning the  Caine Prize in 2002  initialises, Kwani,  a  literary review in Africa. The infrastructure of African writing continues to develop with new publishing houses and the information exchange online of databases and African studies as well as social networks like twitter transcend all publishing barriers giving a Voice to Africa.

The Colonial Linguistic barriers  dividing  Africa – reinforced

The question of language was always debated regarding the logic of English in literature writing in indigenous languages grew

Ngugi Wa Thiong’   wrote his novels ‘Devil on the Cross’ and ‘Matigari’ in Kikuyu and abandoned English, the language of colonizers.  ‘Devil on the Cross’ was successful in sales and emerged with 50,000 sold copies.The landmark of indigenous language in African literature.

 

Linguistic barriers perpetuate the divisions rooted in colonialism preventing literature from Africa to become cohesive in a movement of Pan Africanism.The Uk celebrates English writers from Africa, France endorsed authors in Francophone brackets from Mali Senegal and Côte d’Ivoire.

Translations do exist, but it is common for intellectuals to get sponsored by ex-colonies. Further investment in translation in the core for Pan Africa readership and appreciation. Established pan African faculties may be the key to resolving the challengeThe challenge of building local markets and readership remains. The selection of a book in the country’s national curriculum can guarantee sales. Sales need buying power and literature is not prioritized as many live in poverty.

The selection of a book in the country’s national curriculum can guarantee sales. Sales need buying power and literature is not prioritized as many live in poverty. Writings contrast the picture of Africa as a continent of darkness and delusion with narrative posing the eclectic and fruitful real Africa.

The call for Africa to rephrase history had arrived in 1986 when Wole Soyinka took center stage as the dramatist in poetic overtones. Exposing corruption and political injustice was no smooth flowing route, -yet the mission to fade away the myth of  Africa being incapable contributes to the need for Africa writing.

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