#CreatePreneur Africa Dobijoki Ema, on a mission to ignite Africa centered education, A MUST-HAVE FOR AFRICA RISING

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The journey of her soul sparked off at early stages at the tender age of two as she joined her mother and a group of South Sudanese women in Cairo, Egypt in 1994, protesting for the rights of education for South Sudanese children.

He life purpose with a focus on Africa centered education as a powerful decolonization tool for healing Africa ignited as she graduated with a Masters in Education (MA in Education: Critical Policy, Equity, and Leadership Studies), triumphing over life adversities in the process.

I believe that through African-Centred education for Black and African children, our communities will truly learn and believe in their value on this planet and lead toward successes.  _ Dobijoki Ema @Dobijoki

 

I discovered that many of the children carried the weight of self hate; they didn’t like their skin color, their culture was not white enough, and they did not believe they could be successful     _ Dobijoki Ema @Dobijoki

Meet  #CreatepreneurAfrica,  The Spirit of Africa Rising –  Dobijoki Ema

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My true passion is to serve people……my people. Ever since I was a young girl I aspired to be a servant of the world and to make sure all of my African brothers and sisters, in particular, are able to live the most powerful and fruitful life, or as close as possible.

I believe that through African-Centred education for Black and African children, our communities will truly learn and believe in their value on this planet and lead toward successes.

What drives me is the Most High, I personally believe I was awarded a gift, which is to learn, fight, strive and carry my community. Seeing my people suffer drives me to carry out my duty in this mystical universe.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was two years old when I attended my first protest for peace and education. My family is from South Sudan but fled to Egypt due to the civil war.
In 1994 at the age of two, my mother and a number of other South Sudanese women went to protest outside of the UNHCR headquarters in Cairo, Egypt for the right to education, as South Sudanese children did not have access to education.
This was my first protest, it is what introduced me to the world of service and social justice. I did not find my passion, it found me.

 

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me most about serving others is that it brings a sense of hope and togetherness to the lives of those that need it most. I ran sex-disaggregated alternative African-Centred programming in South Africa with students from grades 5-7.

The reason I began these programmes at the school I was working out of is because I discovered that many of the children carried the weight of self-hate; they didn’t like their skin color, their culture was not white enough, and they did not believe they could be successful.
The curriculum wasn’t successfully teaching the children about themselves and their culture in a way that empowers them, so I took it upon myself to show them how powerful their indigeneity was. Knowing that the students left the programme with at least one reason to love their Africanness was all I could ask for.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

My drive is not the money, it is the work for the people – I try and make money from other sources while using my drive to love to serve people and my passion for people.

 

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

My first job at the age of 13 was a Youth Service Worker – I worked in my priority neighborhood supporting immigrant and refugee youth in being agents of change. Although I was also one of these youth, having a leadership platform helped me gain more confidence in my abilities to lead and serve.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Knowing that every person I work with will be reminded of their genuine capabilities and worthiness has pushed me and kept me going, but I also believe that my spiritual connectedness to the Most High has empowered me to never give up on serving my people.

As long as there is racism and societal disadvantages faced by people of color, there will be my service.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Success for me is between my actions and my heart. My heart speaks and my actions attempt to follow through with its desires. As long as I am able to align the two I will continue to be successful.

My motivation is the community and the power of people. I have a family that is very close, we serve for one another naturally and have learned the beauty of compassion through our connectedness. My family life lessons along with my personal expectations of love, freedom, and peace motivate me to be more successful in my work.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I love you and I wish you success.

 

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

When I can’t find the right opportunity in the workforce, I create my own. Whenever I find someone who can be of guidance and mentorship, I learn about them and contact them for support. Anything you want to create or be a part of is possible with timing, work, and dedication.

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CreatePreneur Africa

A special series. A preliminary launch of CreatePreurAfrica - The publication of the millennium showcasing the roots of creation that continue to develop in Africa. The haven of creation

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