#CreatepreneurAfrica ,South Africa’s Nena Tenacity, Content developer and Writer

 

 

Screenwriter,content developer and producer,Nena Tenacity has embraced a career in the creative sectors spanning over a decade and a half from humble early day beginnings to becoming 'The Çreator' _ a key content producer.

Her key interest is content and quality with information that expands knowledge and growth.

https://www.facebook.com/KirohoMtoto/

Initially, her inception into the film and television industry was on admin and crew tasks including the local ‘most watched’ South African soapieGenerations” , where she served as the director’s assistant

Thereafter several roles followed on various productions as a  production continuity supervisor.

Eventually, she became involved in research and proposal writing for television producers submitting educational programmes for broadcast content including ‘People of The South’,  a series that was hosted by Dali Tambo, a talk show celebrating key icons in South Africa.

Involved in multiple productions in key roles, eventually, her ongoing work reached fruition in 2008  when she produced a documentary “Dreaming the new” as well as a pilot on Madagascar on a completed 13-part docudrama series on tourism in the SADC region titled “Freeway Tours”.

Mam Dorothy Masuku, forever and always ,advisor, guide and role model

 

 

 

 

 

SEDIBA 2005 NFVF

Her first feature film “Stix and Stones”, a  feature social commentary film exploring the cycles of violence and poverty delving into her personal life realms was developed through National film and video foundation SEDIBA initiative, headed by the acclaimed screenwriting executive and mentor, Alby James. The rights were optioned by a South African production company  Ochre Media.

The rights to the film eventually reverted back to her when the production company that held rights changed management and operational structure.

She then ventured travelling with it to the Rotterdam film festival Babylon workshop and the film is currently on the market for possible production.

Her independent short film streams like ‘Struggles Continue’;  ‘Breaking the chains’ and ‘Strike a Dice’  received development funds during the initiation of the National Film and Video Foundation that was established in South Africa with a mission towards growth and development in the film and television industry.

This was her tool to launch her career forward in the development of several concepts including a series title ‘Let our voices be heard’films from women’s perspective.

She was on board of a development team for a series called ‘A true state of affairs that was a series reflecting migration issues in South Africa and raised xenophobia and other related issues.

Currently, she is on a mission to promote a new feature film  Úshujaa” : Mtoto wa kiroho kurudisha ulimwengu wetu 

#WARRIOR 
*spirit child taking back our earth, a language revolution film portraying

KISWAHILI is a liberating and uniting language across tribes and ethnicity. A Pan-African cause for our SOLIDARITY  to wipe away colonial supremacy of language   Sipho Mushwana

When a new spirit child is born with the ultimate Pan-African cause into an era of awakening, there is a calling to crumble the case and essence of the dominant based engraved world system...the English Language!

Key players on board include ‘Kiswahili Ambassadors’, Sipho Mushwana, Joseph Sarimbo as well as proudly Tanzania actor Kihaka GND as well as Neil Schell

Research and proposal preparation 

  • Eskia Mphalele Documentary
  • Dorothy Masuku Documentary
  • Women in Science Documentary

Her various role included a head researcher on ‘Wordart’ a series by Griffin Films celebrating South African writers and as a writer for Interrogation room a television series by Fremantle media.

Her other writing work included 15-minute films for Karlan Communications titled “Very Fast and not so furious “, a series reflecting film from the perspective of women

 

Producer

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica – #SHUJAA #WARRIOR #LANGUAGE REVOLUTIONIST Nena Tenacity

1.Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My passion…My passion is an outlet of expression, primarily through the tool of language and words

2. How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I can’t remember the exact age, but I always remember my key interest in writing and journaling continuously

3.What about your passion appeals to you the most?

I always thought of it as a regular everyday activity, like eating, drinking and sleeping. It is only in very recent years that I realised the power of words. A life skill of proportional weight

4.What drove you to make money from your passions?

When I learnt it was possible to get an income for spending your precious time in mind spaces that you prefer to.

5.When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

Tough one to answer! I guess payment was always there generally when people around you needed help with wording something or the other or preparing presentations, you would get rewarded in some way or the other. Actual money, my first memory is getting funded by the National Film and Video Foundation for developing my first short film ‘Let our voices be heard’, a short film speaking out against the exploitation and abuse of women.

6.What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

My self-will to battle against the odds and face trials and tribulations in the best manner I could. Other than those initiatives in the industry life the film foundation and many people including Alby James, Clarence Hamilton, Thandi Brewer, Julie Hall and a range of other key players in my personal and professional outlets

Akin Omotoso and Hakeem Kae Kazim, also played key role models in my stance to keep at it.

 7.What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I live by the motto of all and anything you want and desire is possible

8.What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Keep doubting. My precious time is not there to cater for counselling your ‘doubt’ condition

9.What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

All I can say is there will be falls, sometimes harder than others, but persist, keep the vision and endure being what you want to be. Nobody has to conform to fit within social expectations. Rise above and rise high.

 

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica’s Barefoot Boy ,Kenny Sultan Mleke_ Lay down your Heart Bagamoyo,Tanzania

All the way from Mang'ula village, Kilombero in the heart of Morogoro, Tanzania, Kenny Sultan Mleke's ("The Barefoot Boy") purpose driven life was initiated when he authored 'The Plight of my life'. Being diagnosed with the chronic and incurable condition of juvenile diabetes (diabetes, type one) at tender life stages when he turned ten years old,he shares his life pathways towards the calling of upliftment and healing in the midst of poverty, confusion, pain and suffering
“Kenny’s life journey in a tumultuous pathway of ongoing trials and tribulations was soul directed in a  driven journey ahead overcome challenges in pursuit of full research to overcome the bountiful complications of life”
Kenny’s next life calling was the return to his mother’s homeland, in the historical gem of Bagamoyo, a town on the outskirts in a collective montage of economic, political with visual historical relics.
He  founded BACCA-Bagamoyo Children Carers Association and authored his next treasure ‘The Great Image of Bagamoyo town and Tanzania
 20% of the sales of his books go to Bagamoyo Children Carers Association and Mang’ula charities
‘Bagamoyo ‘WHERE_I_LAY_DOWN_MY-HEART’ series ‘The Plight of my Life by Kenny Sultan Mleke
#BAGAMOYO _ ‘WHERE_I_LAY-DOWN_MY_HEART’ SERIES BY Kenny Sultan Mleke
#CreatePreNeurAfrica –  Writer Kenny  Sultans life purpose calling in a town Bagamoyo ‘Where I lay down my heart’

Travelstart Domestic

1. Tell us what drives you? What is your passion? 

Writing and giving to the need is my passion.

 2. How old were you when you realised your passion?

Since I  was a little boy of 10 years old, I had a dream to become a story writer, unfortunately, I wouldn’t have even understood how it could be possible. Then my passion for writing convinced me to give it try.

I started writing my first book. “The Barefoot Boy and gift of shoes and second book. ” The plight of my life and now, ” The great Image of Bagamoyo town and Tanzania”

3. What about your passion appeals to you the most?

Writing a story

 4.What drove you to make money from your passion?

To be honest with you I wanted to be happy and satisfied with what I  do and natural I thought to sell my passion but I don’t expect much. Only thing I do enjoy doing what  I am doing.

5. When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I started to sell my books from last year.

6. What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I knew the road of my dreams isn’t always easy to navigate, sometimes clotted with mountains to climb, obstacles to overcome, and hard, mind-numbing times that will make me feel like quitting. None has ever been said anything worth having does come easily and So I didn’t turn back around  and I like what George Herbert  said; don’t wait the time will never be just right start where  you stand , and work with whatever tools you have at your  command and better  tools will be found as you go along.

7 What motivates you every day to even more successful?

Not to give up for everything.

8.  What do you have to all of the people who doubted you?

To prove they are wrong by doing what I think I can do.

9. What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

Never believe anyone who is trying to tell you that things couldn’t be done
“You can’t be done”, “You can’t do this”
It is all because they don’t know any better.

#ExploringTanzania #ExploremotherlandAfrica Serengeti Itineraries

 

Welcome to the World of the Serengeti Plains. So much to see..where do we begin? There are antelopes and elephant, buffaloes AND MORE.....
Lake Manyara is rich and diverse in both vegetation and wildlife with spectacular views. Exceptional birds and forests!

All about Serengeti National Park.

This name is rooted in the Masaai word “ Siringiti”, meaning endless plain. Serengeti is along the rift valley with amazing  geological formations

It will take up to a full day of about ten hours by bus or driving to get from DaresSalaam to Arusha. A flight takes about 80 minutes. Northern  Circuit Safaris usually takes about  six to seven days

ExploreMotherlandAfrica , Exploring Tanzania Serengeti Safari Itinerary

Let’s take a look at other possible itineraries and safari routes to explore SERENGETI NATIONAL PARK

DAY ONE                                          LAKE MANYARA
  • Lake Manyara Morning Game drive
  • Drive from Lake Manyara to Ngorongoro
DAY TWO                                        NGORONGORO AND SERENGETI
  • Ngorongoro Morning Game Drive
  • Stopping at Olduvai Gorge
  • Afternoon game drive
  • Arrive at camp or lodge Serengeti
DAY 3 - 4                                      SERENGETI GAME DRIVES
  • Full day Game drives
DAY 5                                          SERENGETI TO TARANGIRE
DAY 6                                          TARANGIRE GAME DRIVE
  • Game drive
  • Drive back to Arusha
  • Arrive in Arusha evening
DAY 7                                      Drive, bus or plane back to DAR

 

Alternative Itinerary Option

DAY 1                          Tanzania Arrival  Kilimanjaro airport

Travel to the hotel in Moshi

DAY  2                            Olpopongi Maasai - West Kilimanjaro

Experience Massai lifestyles in a Massai village with :

  • Village Tour
  • Museum
  • Traditional Lunch
  • Walking Safari explores hunting techniques
  • Natural Maasai medicinal cures
DAY 3                 Massai Village to Lake Manyara National Park

Morning drive from Lake Manyara takes from 4-5 hours.

Accommodation at Lake Manyara

DAY 4                        Lake Manyara  to Serengeti National Park
  • Arrive  at Serengeti National Park midday
  • Accommodation  at Serengeti
Day 5 and 6                                      Serengeti National Park

Accommodation Serengeti

Day 7                                                 Serengeti to Karatu

 

Day 8:                                      Karatu to  Ngorongoro crater

 

Itinerary Alternative SERENGETI from Arusha or MOSHI

DAY 1                                      ARUSHA OR MOSHI - TARANGIRE
  • An amazing African landscape  drive  with the following Game drive  and a picnic lunch
  • Overnight  lodge of preference
Day 2 AND 3                                        SERENGETI GAME DRIVE

 

Day 4                                               SERENGETI TO KARATU

 

DAY 5                                      Game drive in Ngorongoro Crater
DAY 6                                  TRAVEL TO AIRPORT

https://www.amazon.com/Shabani-Ibrahim-Mpita/e/B06XJY25J9%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

 

ExploreMotherlandAfrica , Exploring Tanzania Serengeti Safari Itinerary

 

Our standard  Serengeti Safari itinerary is based around the migration safari and can be adapted to suit personal preferences or seasonal changes as well as animal migration. 

Migration is not predictive and varies annually depending on rain availability of water, predators and food as well as the content of phosphorous in the grass

6 DAY SAFARI PLAN

Another alternative is drive from Dar Es Salaam, Julius Nyerere airport and can take up to ten hours

Day 1 –  Arusha – Ngorongoro

Travel time: 4 hours
Distance:  190km

Pick up from DarEsSalaam and travel to the Ngorongoro Conservation  location

Ngorongoro National Park boasts a huge variety of animals,  inclusive of wildebeest herds, buffalo, zebra, hippo, eland, warthog,  as well as the infamous African elephants.

The dense national park has lions jackals, hyenas, cheetahs and leopards too.

Another big draw card to this picturesque national park is it’s dense population The shallow  Lake Magadi, the main feature  is an alkaline lake  with viewings of hippos, flamingos, hippos  and various water birds

.

Day 2 – Ngorongoro – Ndutu

Travel: 2 hours
Distance: 90 km

Lake Ndutu is  in the southern Serengeti system and is alkaline and the array of wildlife flock to it

After lunch, we complete a game drive in Ndutu. Wildebeest migration usually occurs from December to April. The area has resident game elephants and birds too!

Day 3 – Ndutu

This is a full day game drive in Ndutut. Explore different habitats that including woodlands and swamps, woodland, soda lakes and Serengeti short grass plains. with  wildebeest and zebra Serengeti Plains

 Travel time: 2 hours
Distance: 80 km

Serengeti National Park or  Seronera is the heart of wildlife in Africa – there are endless plains with rich wildlife habitats that feature the Seronera River, water attracts wildlife and representing Serengeti’s species.

Then an afternoon game drive in the Serengeti national park.

.

 

 

Day 6 – Serengeti Plains – Arusha

A half day game drive and we journey back to Arusha airport. You will be led to the next desired venture of your choice whether is beach  relaxation in Zanzibar or a preferred City tour

 

 

 

MIKUMI NATIONAL PARK< SAFARI IN TANZANIA ITINERARY

Are You Ready for a Trip to the Mikumi National Park in Tanzania?

Located in the South East of Tanzania, Mikumi National park is one of the largest national parks. You get to see zebras, lions, impala, buffalo, wildebeest, kudu, giraffe, elephants baboons, elands and about 400 bird species!

 

 

MIKUMI NATIONAL PARK

ITINERARY

Day 1:  

  • We leave Bagamoyo at 8am. En route we take a lunchbreak at Morogoro, a beautiful region near the Uluguru Mountains. Once our scenic lunch break is over, it will take an hour and half to reach the Mikumi National Park.
  • We check in at Camp Bastion. Located close to Mikumi National Park, it is comfortable accommodation in a friendly atmosphere with unique natural surroundings. Then it will be time rest until our first venue for exploration in the regio.n
  • At 4pm we visit Maasai Village and explore interesting traditions and lifestyle of the  Masaai culture
  • Finally we have dinner and have an overnight stay at Camp Bastion

Day 2

We start the morning with an early breakfast at 6am and then depart to Mikumi for the Game Drive. By 7am we begin with the Game Drive  in Mikumi National Park. At about 1pm we stop for a picnic lunch. After lunch we continue with the game drive until about 4pm.

We then take a scenic drive back to Bagamoyo.

 

The package includes

  • Accommodation and meals as per itinerary
  • Refreshments
  • Field guide
  • 4WD Land Cruiser with roof hatch
  • All wildlife reserve entrance fees

https://www.amazon.com/Shabani-Ibrahim-Mpita/e/B06XJY25J9%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

 

“#CreatepreneurAfrica”:Touching Base with Shabani Mpita-Tanzania

Learn Kiswahili #THE LANGUAGE REVOLUTION with Joseph Sarimbo – Kiswahili Noun Class Lesson Two

Greetings my fellow Kiswahili learners

.

Karibu…….Welcome again. Let us quickly revise Greetings, as we greet each other and meet again! Our  #LanguageRevolution. Journey of the millineum!

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/the-languagerevolution-learn-kiswahili-with-joseph-sarimbo-1/

Our  second Kiswahili lesson plan   touches on grammar and noun classes, a crucial component in Kiswahili #THELANGUAGEREVOLUTION…..let us delve my fellow warriors #SHUJAA

Learn Kiswahili #THELANGUAGEREVOLUTION… at your doorstep with Joseph Sarimbo…! Lesson One

COMMAND SIMPLE IMPERATIVE (command or an instruction, telling someone what to do or influencing behaviour). To make command simple imperative you will need to drop infinitive KU for the non-monosyllabic verb and keep infinitive KU for the monosyllabic verb.

Let us view some examples to get the gist of it……….

Kupika: To cook               Pika chakula                 Cook food

Kusoma: To read             Soma kitabu                  Read a book.

Kuimba: To sing              Imba wimbo                  Sing a song.

Kuchukua : To take         Chukua kitabu               Take a book

Kula :To eat                     Kula chakula                    Eat food

Kunywa: To drink           Kunywa chai                   Drink tea.

 

VERB “TO BE” IN PRESENT

“To be” is expressed with monosyllabic KUWA ( to be) in other tenses, But in present is expressed with:

Positive: NI
Negative: SI

Mti ni mrefu            The tree is tall.
Mti si mrefu tree     The tree is not tall.
Mtoto ni mdogo       The child is small.
Mtoto si mdogo        The child is not small.
Kitabu ni kizuri        The book is good
Kitabu si kizuri         The book is not good

 

The core of sentence construction all essentially relates to the noun class. For example in the case of possessive pronouns, it takes a subject prefix depending on the noun class. In our agreement charts, we have a noun prefix and a subject prefix. Noun prefix are used with adjectives
Subject prefixes are used with possessive pronouns and also during verb constructions

There are 15 NOUN CLASSES in Kiswahili
They are grouped into characteristics and vowel harmony

Every noun class has both singular and plural. Class one and two are animate classes. All the animate( living things)take prefixes from these classes.

This noun class consist of the following nouns

  • People M- singular and WA- plural
    People nouns

Class 1: Animate which start with M or M(W)

Class 2: Animate which start with WA.

(1&2) are singular & plural.

Example:

mtoto/watoto [child/children]
mgeni/wageni [visitor/visitors]
mfaransa/wafaransa [French person/French people]
mjomba/wajomba [uncle/uncles]
mke/wake [wife/wives]
mkulima/wakulima [farmer/farmers]
mpishi/wapishi [cook/cooks]
msichana/wasichana [girl/girls]
mtu/watu [person/people]
mume/waume [husband/husbands]
mvulana/wavulana [boy/boys]
mzee/wazee [elder/elders]
mzungu/wazungu [white man/woman/white men/women]
mjerumani/wajerumani [German person/German people]
mwanamume/wanaume [man/men]
mwanamke/wanawake [woman/women]
mwalimu/walimu [teacher/teachers]
mwanafunzi/wanafunzi [student/students]
mwafrika/waafrika [African person/African people]

When forming sentences and using a verb, it will be a,  in singular if you use third person singular and –wa , in plural

But when you use relative class for class 9/10 with possessive you will use the prefix of the same classes.

Examples

Rafiki yangu alikuja nyumbani. [My friend came home.]
Rafiki zangu walikuja nyumbani. [ My Friends came home.]
Mama yangu anapika kuku. [My mother is cooking chicken.]
Mama wanapika kuku. [Mothers are cooking chicken.]

Class 3/4 are for nouns (things) which start with M and plural start MI

This noun class has the following nouns:

1. majina ya miti [names of trees]
2. majina ya mimea [names of plants]
3. sehemu za mwili [body parts]

nouns that take M- in singular and MI- in plural, radicals that start with a vowel:
nouns that take MW- in singular and MI- in plural
particular cases: singular prefix MU-

Majina ya miti _Names of trees.

mti/miti [tree/trees]
mnazi/minazi [coconut tree/coconut trees]
mchungwa/michungwa [orange tree/orange trees]
mwembe/miembe [mango tree/mango trees]
mtofaa/mitofaa [apple tree/apple trees]
mpapai/mipapai [papaya tree/papaya trees]
mndimu/mindimu [lime tree/lime trees]
mpera/mipera [guava tree/guava trees]
mgomba/migomba [banana tree/banana trees]

Sehemu za mwili _Body parts

mdomo/midomo [mouth/mouths]
mkono/mikono [hand/hands]
mguu/miguu [leg/legs]
mfupa/mifupa [bone/bones]
mgongo/migongo [back/backs]
moyo/mioyo [heart/hearts]
mwili/miili [body/bodies

Nouns that take M- in singular and MI- in plural

mfano/mifano [example/examples]
mji/miji [city/cities]
mkoba/mikoba [bag/bags]
mfuko/mifuko [bag/bags]
mlango/milango [door/doors]
mtihani/mitihani [exam/exams]/tests]
mlima/milima [mountain/mountains]
mpira/mipira [ball/balls]
mkate/mikate [bread/breads]
mto/mito [river/rivers]
mungu/miungu [god/gods]
mchezo/michezo [game/games]
moto/mioto [fire/fires]
msikiti/misikiti [mosque/mosques]
msitu/misitu [forest/forests]
mswaki/miswaki [toothbrush/toothbrushes]
mto/mito [river/rivers, pillow/pillows]

Nouns that take MW- in singular and MI- in plural

mwaka/miaka [year/years]
mwavuli/miavuli [umbrella/umbrellas]
mwezi/miezi [month/months]
mwiba/miiba [thorn/thorns]
mwisho/miisho [end/ ends]

Particular cases: singular prefix

MU-
muhindi/mihindi [corn]

muhogo/mihogo [cassava/cassavas]
muwa/miwa [sugarcane]
1. Mti ulianguka. [The tree fell.]
Miti ilianguka. [The trees fell.]
2. Mkono unauma. [The hand hurts.]
Mikono inauma. [The hands hurt.]
3. Mkoba umeoshwa. [The bag has been washed.]
Mikoba imeoshwa. [The bags have been washed.]

Class 5/6

This is for nouns which plural start with MA. Singular can start with any Noun but plural must start with MA.Nouns in this class can start with any letter in their singular form but their plural forms must take MA-.
This noun class has the following nouns:

A). manufactured products, natural or built places, abstract or concrete
concepts
B). sehemu za mwili [parts of the body]
C). matunda na vitu vya kawaida [fruits and natural objects]
D). majina ya vitu ambavyo havihesabiki [These nouns exist only in the plural
form and are things which cannot be counted. They take MA- in both
singular and plural form]
E) majina ya watu few names of people.

A). Manufactured products, natural or built places,
abstract or concrete concepts

1. Manufactured products:

blanketi/mablanketi [blanket/blankets]
dirisha/madirisha [window/windows]
gari/magari [car/cars]
gazeti/magazeti [newspaper/newspapers]
godoro/magodoro [mattress/mattresses]
sanduku/masanduku [box/boxes]
jiko/meko/majiko [gas cooker/gas cookers]

2. Natural or Built places:

daraja/madaraja [bridge/bridges]
duka/maduka [shop/shops]
shamba/mashamba [farm/farms]
soko/masoko [market/markets]
ziwa/maziwa [lake/lakes]
jimbo/majimbo [state/states]

3. Abstract or Concrete concepts:

jina/majina [name/names]
kosa/makosa [mistake/mistakes]
neno/maneno [word/words]
jambo/mambo [issue/issues]
jiwe/mawe [stone/stones]
somo/masomo [subject/subjects; lesson/lessons]
wazo/mawazo [thought/thoughts]
jibu/majibu
swali/maswali
jukumu/majukumu [responsibility/responsibilities]
juma/majuma [week/weeks

B). Sehemu za mwili [parts of the body]

jicho/macho [eye/eyes]
jino/meno [tooth/teeth]
bega/mabega [shoulder/shoulders]
goti/magoti [knee/knees]
sikio/masikio [ear/ears]
tumbo/matumbo [stomach/bowels]
paja/mapaja [thigh/thighs]

C). Matunda na vitu vya kawaida  [fruits and natural objects]

1.Fruits:

chungwa/machungwa [orange/oranges]
embe/maembe [mango/mangoes]
limau/malimau [lemon/lemons]
nanasi/mananasi [pineapple/pineapples]
papai/mapapai [pawpaw/pawpaws]
dafu/madafu [coconut/coconuts (with milk)]
tofaa/matofaa [apple/apples]

2. Natural Objects:

jani/majani [leaf/leaves]
yai/mayai [egg/eggs]
rinda/marinda [dress/dresses]

3. Majina ya vitu ambavyo havihesabiki [nouns of things that cannot be counted, whichexist only in the plural form

maji [water]
mafuta [oil]
mali [wealth]
maafa [misfortune]

Zingatia [Note]

When using a verb, this noun class uses LI- in singular and YA- in
plural for sentence formation.

Sentence Formation

Mifano:Example

1. Chungwa limenunuliwa. [The orange has been bought.]
Machungwa yamenunuliwa. [The oranges have been bought.]
2. Gari limefika. [The car has arrived.]
Magari yamefika. [The cars have arrived.]
3. Jicho linauma. [The eye hurts.]
Macho yanauma. [The eyes hurt.]
4. Maji yamemwagika. [The water has been poured.]

Class 7/8
Class 7 & 8 is for nouns which start with KI or CH / VI or VY

This noun class has the following nouns:
A). nouns that take KI- in singular and VI- in plural
B). nouns that take CH- in singular and VY- in plural
C). body parts [sehemu za mwili]
D). names of languages [majina ya lugha]
E) some few animates

A). Nouns that take KI- in singular and VI- in plural
kiti/viti [chair/chairs]

kitabu/vitabu [book/books]
kiatu/viatu [shoe/shoes]
kisu/visu [knife/knives]
kikombe/vikombe [cup/cups]
kilima/vilima [hill/hills]
kisiwa/visiwa [island/islands]
kiazi/viazi [potato/potatoes]
kitunguu/vitunguu [onion/onions]
kitu/vitu [thing/things]
kitanda/vitanda [bed/beds]
kioo/vioo [mirror/mirrors]
kiberiti/viberiti [match/matches]

B). Nouns that take CH- in singular and VY- in plural

chuo/vyuo [school/schools; college/colleges]
choo/vyoo [restroom/restrooms]
chakula/vyakula [food/foods]
chumba/vyumba [room/rooms]
cheti/vyeti [certificate/certificates]
chama/vyama [party/parties; association/associations]
chuma/vyuma [iron/irons]
chombo/vyombo [container/containers; utensil/utensils]
cheo/vyeo [rank/ranks]

C). Body Parts [sehemu za mwili]

kichwa/vichwa [head/heads]
kiuno/viuno [waist/waists]
kifua/vifua [chest/chests]
kidole/vidole [finger/fingers]

D). Names of Languages [majina ya lugha]

Kiarabu [Arabic]
Kifaransa [French]
Kiingereza [English]
Kichina [Chinese]
Kijapani [Japanese]
Kichwa kinauma. [The head is hurting.]
Vichwa vinauma. [The heads are hurting.]
2. Kiti kilivunjwa na mtoto. [The chair was broken by a child]
Viti vilivunjwa. [The chairs were broken.]
3. Chuo kimefungwa. [The college has been closed.]
Vyuo vimefungwa. [The college have been closed.]
4. Chakula kitapikwa. [The food will be cooked.]
Vyakula vitapikwa. [The foods will be cooked.]

Class 9/10  : These is nouns which singular and plural are the same.

 

Example:
Habari/habari. News

barua/barua [letter/letters]
chupa/chupa [bottle/bottles]
dawa/dawa [drug/drugs; medicine/medicines]
kalamu/kalamu [pen/pens]
karatasi/karatasi [paper/papers]
ngoma/ngoma [drum/drums]
sabuni/sabuni [soap/soaps]
sahani/sahani [plate/plates]
sufuria/sufuria [pan/pans]
suruali/suruali [trouser/trousers]
chaki/chaki [chalk/chalk]
dola/dola [dollar/dollars]
kompyuta/kompyuta [computer/computers]
nguo/nguo [cloth/cloths]
soksi/soksi [sock/socks]
shilingi/shilingi [shilling/shillings]
meza/meza [table/tables]
taa/taa [light/lights]
senti/senti [cent/cents]
nyumba/nyumba [house/houses]

Nature:

ardhi/ardhi [earth; ground]
bahari/bahari [sea]
baridi/baridi [cold]
barafu/barafu [ice]
hewa/hewa [air; atmosphere]
nuru/nuru [light]
mvua/mvua [rain]
njia/njia [way]
bandari/bandari [harbor]
barabara/barabara [road]
nchi/nchi [country]

Abstract concepts:

ajali/ajali [accident/accidents]
bahati/bahati [luck/lucks]
furaha/furaha [joy/joys]
hasara/hasara [loss/losses]
hatari/hatari [danger/dangers]
huzuni/huzuni [sadness/sadnesses]
nguvu/nguvu [strength/strengths]
shida/shida [problem/problems]
thamani/thamani [value/values]
dakika/dakika [minute/minutes]
sifa/sifa [praise/praises; reputation/reputations]
ndoto/ndoto [dream/dreams]
shughuli/shughuli [business/businesses]

B). Foods, fruits, and vegetables

chai/chai [tea/teas]
chumvi/chumvi [salt/salts]
kahawa/kahawa [coffee/coffees]
mboga/mboga [vegetable/vegetables]
nazi/nazi [coconut/coconuts]
ndizi/ndizi [banana/bananas]
nyama/nyama [meat/meats]
pilipili/pilipili [pepper/[peppers]
siagi/siagi [butter; margarine]
sukari/sukari [sugar/sugars]
njugu/njugu [groundnut/groundnuts]

Zingatia [Note]

mbwa/mbwa [dog/dogs]
paka/paka [cat/cats]
ng’ombe/ng’ombe [cow/cows]
simba/simba [lion/lions]
ndovu/ndovu [elephant/elephants]
Ndege/ndege [birds]
kuku/kuku [hen/hens]
kasuku/kasuku [parrot/parrots]
tai/tai [eagle/eagles]
bata mzinga/bata mzinga turkey/turkeys]

 

Wadudu [insects]
nyuki/nyuki [bee/bees]
mbu/mbu [mosquito/mosquitoes]
nzi/nzi [fly/flies]
When using a verb, this noun class uses I- in singular and ZI- in plural
for sentence formation.

Sentence Formation

Mifano:
1. Kalamu imeanguka. [The pen has fallen.]
Kalamu zimeanguka. [The pens have fallen.]
2. Njia imefungwa. [The way has been closed.]

Njia zimefungwa. [The ways have been closed.]

Class 9/10 is a relative class. All relative nouns belong to class 9/10.

Examples

baba/baba [father/fathers]
babu/babu [grandfather/grandfathers]
dada/dada [sister/sisters]
kaka/kaka [brother/brothers]
mama/mama [mother/mothers]
Bibi/bibi [grandmother/grandmothers]
rafiki/rafiki [friend/friends]
shangazi/shangazi [aunt/aunts]

Class 11
This class noun can start with U or WA
This class is a singular class. If the noun need plural will borrow class 10 or class 6

U – U [U – ZI]
U – U [U – U]

This noun class has the following nouns:
A). concrete nouns with various plurals
B). uncountable nouns, with no plural form
C). nouns that are mostly formed from adjectives, nominals, or verbal roots
D). names of countries

A). Concrete nouns with various plurals
U – NY:

uso/nyuso [face/faces]
uzi/nyuzi [thread/threads]
ua/nyua [courtyard/courtyards]
ufa/nyufa [crack/cracks]
uma/nyuma [fork/forks]

U – ND:

ulimi/ndimi [tongue/tongues]
udevu/ndevu [beard/beards]

U – MB:

ubao/mbao [board/boards]
ubavu/mbavu [rib/ribs]
ubawa/mbawa [wing/wings]

U – Ø:

unywele/nywele [one hair/hair]
ufunguo/funguo [key/keys]
ukuta/kuta [wall/walls]
upande/pande [side/sides]
uvumbi/vumbi [grain of dust/dust]
upanga/panga [machete/machetes]
upepo/pepo [wind/winds]

W – NY:

wakati/nyakati [time/times]
wembe/nyembe [razor blade/razor blades]
wimbo/nyimbo [song/songs]

B). Uncountable nouns, with no plural form .Nouns in this category doesn’t have plural sentence formation when using a verb(s).

udongo [soil; ground]
ugali [corn paste]
uji [porridge]
ulimwengu [world]
umeme [electricity]
umri [age]
unga [flour]
usingizi [sleep]
uwongo [a lie]

C). Nouns that are mostly formed from adjectives, nominals, or verbal roots
Nouns in this category doesn’t have plural when using a
verb(s). Nominal roots: NOUN – NOUN

jamaa – ujamaa [group of people – community]
kijana – ujana [young person – young age]
mzee – uzee [old person – old age]
maskini – umaskini [poor person – poverty]
mchawi – uchawi [witch – witchcraft]
mfalme – ufalme [king – kingdom]
mtoto – utoto [child – childhood]
Verbal roots: VERB – NOUN
kuiba – uwizi [to steal – theft]
kukosa – ukosefu [to miss – deficiency]
kupenda – upendo [to love – love]
kuweza – uwezo [to be able – capacity]
kusahau – usahaulifu [to forget – forgetfulness]

D). Names of countries

Ufaransa [France]
Uganda [Uganda]
Uingereza [England]
Ujerumani [Germany]
Ureno [Portugal]
Urusi [Russia]

Zingatia [Note]

When using a verb, this noun class uses U- in singular and ZI or YA in plural depending in class
for sentence formation. However, uncountable nouns and nouns that are
formed from adjectival, nominal, or verbal roots only use U-.

Sentence Formation

Mifano:
1. Ulimi unauma. [The tongue hurts.]
Ndimi zinauma. [The tongues hurt.]
2. Ufunguo umepotea. [The key has been lost.]
Funguo zimepotea. [The keys have been lost.]
3. Ubavu umevunjika. [The rib has broken.]
Mbavu zimevunjika. [The ribs have broken.]
4. Ugali umepikwa. [The cornmeal has been cooked.]
5. Upendo wao umesifika. [Their love has been praised.]

Class 15
This class is for all verbs change to become a noun.

Example
Kusoma, kuimba ,kucheza.

Class 16,17,18 we call them location class

Noun class Subject prefix
1. Mtoto
2.watoto
3.mkate U
4.mikate i
5.Tunda li
6. Matunda ya
7. Kitabu ki
8.vitabu vi
9.habari i
10. Habari zi
11. Usiku u
15. Kusoma ku
16. Mahali pa
17. Mjini ku
18.mwilini M(u)
Mtoto wangu My child
Watoto wangu My children
Mtoto wako Your child
Kitabu chake His/Her book
Usiku wetu Our night
Mkate wenu Your bread
Maisha yao Their life

 

Learn Kiswahili Here!

Learn Kiswahili #THELANGUAGEREVOLUTION… at your doorstep with Joseph Sarimbo…! Lesson One

 

We begin the Learn Kiswahili journey as a standard course, this includes exchanging the appropriate greetings and talking about daily activities and progress to an intermediate level with exercises and practical application.

 

LESSON ONE :   MAAMKIZI/ GREETINGS

 

Welcome, take this journey with me as we delve into the new KISWAHILI millenium .....#THE LANGUAGEREVOLUTION.....COMING SOON! 

We begin with Greetings
No Kiswahili speaker will participate in any conversation without greetings......Lets Get Started 

#CreatePreneurAfrica from the foothills of Kilimanjaro- Joseph Adelard Sarimbo

In Kiswahili we have two types of Greetings:

1: General Greetings.
2: Specific Greetings.

1: GENERAL GREETINGS

This is types of greetings which you can use at any time of the day, be it  morning, afternoon, evening or night.

a)  Scene One : Let’s launch into greetings between two people ( Joni and Maria), that meet each other

Joni:      Habari za leo?                                How are you today?

An alternative is Habari Gani?               How are things?

Maria:   Nzuri sana , hujambo?             Very Good , how are  you?
Joni:      Sijambo  , Asante                           I am fine, thanks

Maria : Haya, Kwa heri                                 Ok, Goodbye

Joni : Asante, Kwa heri                                    Thanks , Goodbye!

Vocabulary

Habari                               news
- zuri                               good
Hujambo                             How are you?
Sijambo                             I am fine
Asante                             Thank you
Jambo                              Matter /problem

Scene Two : Baraka meets Maria

Baraka:  Habari gani ndugu?                          How are you friend.
Maria:     Nzuri, hujambo?                          Am good, how are you?
Baraka:    Sijambo                                             I am fine

Vocabulary:

Ndugu :   relative, friend, comrade

 

More Greetings………….

Habari za saa hizi?            How are  you this time?

Nzuri , hujambo?                Good , how are you?
Sijambo                                  I  am fine.

Salama?                               Are you fine?

Salama                                  Fine

Mzima?                                Mzima

U hali gani?                         How are you? Whats your condition

Umelalaje?                           How have you slept

Umeamkaje?                         How did you wake up?

Mzima /Salama/Safi

 

Youth Greetings

Mambo vipi?                            How are you?
Poa                                             cool/ fine

Greetings from young to elders

This greeting is used from young person to adult as respect.

Shikamoo                   I respect you
Marahaba                   I accept your respect.

You can mention the title of a person.  For example, Shikamoo mama, Shikamoo baba, Shikamoo kaka etc

Part One of Greeting! Taking it step by step..Part Two of Kiswahili greetingS

SPECIFIC GREETINGS

This is types of Greetings which are used at a specific time. Example: Asubuhi, Mchana, Jioni or Usiku

Morning Greetings - 
Joni: Habari za asubuhi?               How are you this morning?
Maria: Nzuri, hujambo?              Am good , how are you?
Joni: sijambo sana         Am very fine.
Asubuhi -               Morning
Afternoon greetings:

Joni: Habari za mchana?                    How are  you this afternoon? 
    Maria: Nzuri sana. Hujambo?            I am very fine. How are  you?
Joni: Sijambo dada            Am fine sister.
Evening Greetings
Maria: habari za jioni?                   How are  you this evening? 
Joni: nzuri dada, hujambo?              Am fine sister, hows you?
Maria: Sijambo kabisa             I am absolutely fine
                            Night Greetings

Maria:Habari za usiku ndugu?    How are you this night friend? 
Joni: nzuri, hujambo?           Am good , How are you?
Maria : sijambo rafiki          I am good friend.
Vocabulary

Jioni :  Evening
Usiku:   Night
Rafiki : Friend

 

Other Greetings
Umeshindaje?                How are you conquer your day

Salama                                        Well/good

Uko poa?                          Are you fine?
Nipo poa                                                  I am fine

 

KUJITAMBULISHA/ SELF INTRODUCTION



Before we go to self introduction lets see personal pronouns in Swahili:
we have six personal pronouns in Swahili.


MIMI I, ME
WEWE YOU
YEYE HE/SHE
SISI WE/US
NINYI YOU (Plr)
WAO THEY/THEM
                             Subject prefix
MIMI NI
WEWE U
YEYE A
SISI TU
NINYI M(U)
WAO WA
Amani:  Jina langu ni Amani                My name is Amani.
Na wewe je?                                And what about you?
Joseph: Jina langu ni Joseph               My name is Joseph.
Amani: Umetoka nchi gani?                  Which country are you from?
Joseph:   Nimetoka marekani                I am from USA.
Amani: Nimefurahi kukutana na wewe         I am happy to meet you.
Joseph: asante ndugu                       Thank you friend
Vocabulary:

Jina       Name
-angu        my
Kutoka       To come out of
Nchi         Country
Gani?        What kind/ which
Kufurahi     to glad / to be happy
Kukutana     to meet
Kuitwa      to be called
Nani          who
-ako          your

 

Joseph:  Naitwa Joseph           I am called Joseph.
Wewe waitwa nani?                Who are you called? (Whats your name?)


Amani: Naitwa Amani             I am called Amani.
Joseph: Umetoka nchi gani?      Which country are you from? 


Amani: Nimetoka Uingereza        I am from England.
Na wewe je?                      What about you?
Joseph:Nimetoka Tanzania         I  am from Tanzania.

 
Jina lako nani?           Whats your name?
Jina langu ni Amani       My name is Amani.
Na wewe je?              What about you?
Jina langu ni Joseph     My name is Joseph

Join Us as we continue to continue in #THELANGUAGE REVOLUTION

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/createprenuerafrica-proudly-tanzanian-actor-kihaka-gnd/

#CreatePreneurAfrica’s @i_am_godfather,Mike Ogoke, Shining the Light on Africa’s Treasure of Talent

CreatepreneurAfrica's Michael Ogoke , a notable South African Nigerian, is polished with a soul vision ready to sparkle the final shine of Africa's treasure of talent to rise in the helms of universal stardom. His focus and sheer determination is to showcase the jewels of Africa's talent to the  world.

"Africa should not have to wait to be given a helping hand when developing ideas because the talent and creative minds that Africans have are sufficient to ensure originality, creativity and success in all our products”.                             _Mike Ogoke


Nurturing, developing and empowering Africans in the entertainment world, Mike Ogoke had built the throne of Godfather Productions, a black-owned, dynamic platform that is the ultimate route to steps ahead in music, film, TV, Music, Commercial and Corporate Identity.

 

A major player in the African film and entertainment industry, Godfather Productions is behind groundbreaking music videos featuring the likes of renowned African artists like, P square, Tuface, Flavour, Da les, Timaya and Diamond Platinumz, to name a few…

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica  @I_Am_Godfather Mike Ogoke

www.godfatherproduction.com

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is when i see that people smile & happy towards what i do to promote our continent & also put food on the table in terms of providing jobs for people.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I started at the age of 18yrs old & my passion is doing that which i do that gives me Joy.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

When am busy working and advising people.

 What drove you to make money from your passions?

Passion drove me into making money

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I have NOT been paid for my passion yet!

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Passion

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Passion  and when I see that what  I was part off have caught fire in the Continent & people are now recognizing the work all over the globe

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

To be focus & have passion first

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

To be passionate and be focused.




A

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica from the foothills of Kilimanjaro- Joseph Adelard Sarimbo

 

His soul voice streams in a flow of world explorers navigating to get seeded with the roots of Kiswahili. Joseph Adelard Sarimbo's  daily lessons are an invigorating gist of Africa's Culture at the helm of life.

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/createprenuerafrica-proudly-tanzanian-actor-kihaka-gnd/

He is currently part of a feature film team as a key contributor to “Shujaa, Kiroho Mtoto”, an upcoming feature film set to make the mark of the millineum!

 

 

 

Many missionaries, travelers and workers from all over the world with life driven purposes in East Africa, begin there journey in Kiswahili tunes at the ELCT language school in Morogoro where he teaches.

The liberating  language of unity for the continent of Africa is Kiswahili                                Joseph Adelard Sarimbo

He is also involved in community work and helps the farmers and livestock keepers always providing advice and ideas with the aim of elevating them from local farming methods towards implementing modern ‘agribusiness’ methodologies.

In the near future, he aims to open his own Kiswahili language and cultural learning center.

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica- Joseph Sarimbo Soothsayer of the KiSwahili Linguist Imperliasm movement

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My passion is world unity. My passion is the dimension of interconnection. I have a passion for people.  What drives me?

I am driven by my love of my language (Kiswahili) because I want to spread the Kiswahili language of unity to every corner of the world!

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was sixteen years old when envisioned my calling. My life purpose…. I actively participated in community activities,  I was not sure of the pathway to follow. It was an idea. Then I met a friend, Jofrey. I explained my dream to him. He advised me and guided me on how I could start, He contributed to making me realize my dreams.

 What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

My passion is a key to help others. It is a gift. I love to be able to share and care

What drove you to make money from your passions?

That question can be perceived in many ways. What is making money? Make a profit? Afford luxuries? It was not ultimately about making money, but I was glad I could make a living from contributions of a skill in my life pathway.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I started getting paid in 2011 when I started to work doing what I love doing.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I didn’t think about giving up. Sometimes I face challenges but I know challenges are part of life. I keep think positive and focus on my passions.
Having people around who encourage me every time makes me feel strong every day. I believe with God everything is possible

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

When I am teaching there  I try to be creative and make my students enjoying the class.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

By doing all I can do to help to motivate other people and change their life when they are looking at my success. If I don’t make a difference for doubters, I will spread out and make a difference  to others!

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

When you work hard on your passion you will reach your destination. Don’t let your passions fade. Work hard to awaken your passions and make your dream come true. I know I did!

https://web.facebook.com/bryansarimbo?ref=br_rs

#CreatePreneurAfrica, Bagamoyo’s Pili Mtonga -The Art of Passion@Fashion!

Bagamoyo (where I lay down my heart), in East Africa,Tanzania is a remote historic town with relics of the past infused with realms of the future. There are many passers-by, essentially so, but those who have not come across #CreatePreneurAfrica Pili Mtonga's eyecatching 'fashion with a passion' base across the Bagamoyo art market, have missed out on the true creative essence of the art throbbing landmark of note!

http://amapbagamoyo.wixsite.com/amaorganization

PILI MTONGA  +255 657 348 876

https://web.facebook.com/pili.mtonga.5?ref=br_rs

 

Africa Modern Art Bagamoyo

[

Pili Mtonga’s early beginnings of creativity initially began to launch when she was selected by SVETAN – a Swedish Tanzania Association Scholarship.

She then went on to the Gotland College of Arts study abroad program and the Royal art academy in Sweden. It was all about modern art, carvings, sculpture, and design. Back home in Tanzania, Arusha she joined an African American community center for children’s education programme at St Margaret’s primary school and trained in handicrafts.

https://web.facebook.com/Africamodernartfashion-665552017109241/

Eventually, she became engaged in fashion design, handmade designs until the introduction of manual sewing machines opened up an exciting brand of uplifting possibilities of mass production and a team.

Visitors order an item they desire, and it is designed and created within a few hours! They leave with an authentic Bagamoyo masterpiece of crafted style!

Pili has triumphed in her zest for the creation and has become a soul healing  ‘must see’ phenomena in Bagamoyo!

  • Chairperson and Artist member Bagamoyo Sculpture Association
  • Assistant teacher Bagamoyo Sculpture school
  • Chairperson and Teacher Africa Modern Art in Bagamoyo

#AFRICA MODERN ART FASHION

The Story Of Bagamoyo

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica – Pili Mtonga Bagamoyo (lay down your heart) at the essence of fashion

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me….my family…and creating happiness…or should I sat satisfaction, when I see people in awe of seeing their visions become a reality.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I don’t know where to begin…if it’s about stating a year all age…I don’t remember when I was not passionate about creation…in so many forms.

 What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me, in my current line creating designs is seeing smiles. I just love giving people what they ask for…making dreams a reality.

What drove you to make money from your passion?

When you love what you do, you make sure your passion sustains you. Or you will spend all of life’s, precious moments in disarray and frustration…that causes all the chaos in today’s world. When people are forced to do what they have no desire for..because society and the economy preaches it as good choices.I chose to do what I love. And I make a living from it.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I used to repair and ‘reinvent’ my worn out school uniforms…economically. it made better sense than getting a new supply. Others noticed and their parents gave me little rewards first for their kids and then gradually for them too!

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going is motivation. I knew a lot depended on me. I had to make it happen.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Knowing the round world is abundant and my product has reached every corner of the world through tourist passers-by who always take treasures back home.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Keep doubting…I will keep doing. Little precious time left to pay attention to doubters.

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

This is very important to me. I want to empower all around me. I usually give workshops and training to women and youth. Volunteers from abroad are keen to learn fashion style beyond commercial boundaries as well. There are so many possibilities and I know I sharing these skills will be a tool to uplift so many.

I see this as my purpose in life and my main aim is to get an efficient workshop space in order.  I know once this is there, my  heart….along with all who pass by will be filled with joy!

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Africa Modern Arts Project Bagamoyo @ Saidi Mbungu

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica, Tanzania Rhythm with Saxophonist Zephania Malembela

In his early childhood, he actively engaged in a school band playing Ndulilu, (a local flute). In later teen years he initiated playing the keyboard and joined in the church choir.

He tuned his destiny into a melodious pathway when he laid his hands on a harmonious discovery.....an abandoned saxophone that collected dust in a church.........

Welcome to the world of Zaphania Melembela, a saxophonist from the shores of East Africa, Tanzania.
Rooted in a musical family of love from the Sukuma ethnic group , where traditional music is a key component of every social activity, Zephaniah completed high school and relocated to Dar-es-Salaam to pursue a new chapter of higher education.
Education curriculums did not usually include any formal music lessons. In 2009 he enrolled at the Dar-Es-Salaam Institute of Technology and successfully completed his studies in Science and laboratory Technology in 2013.
The Institute of Technology was not a waste of time, it was strategic articulation to secure a day job and finance formal music lessons from beginner to advanced levels. The studies in technology became a great back up.
 |||A career in music was something that no parent in Tanzania would wish his/her child to pursue at the time|||
He never swayed from his passion for music, even though he had no formal music training.
The year 2012 marked an eventful turnaround year for Zephania. He met a friend from Nigeria who had a book on saxophones….and then there was a church with a forgotten saxophone that nobody bothered to learn playing.
A year of self-teaching continued with little progress. Then in October 2013, he met Frank Masamba , the famous composer and saxophonist since the 1980”s
Frank just returned from Mombasa(Kenya, where he worked as a hotel entertainer.
Zephania gained key insight into saxophone techniques and learned the foundation of African music.
This continued till 2014. He continued as a church musician and started exploring beyond church walls, engaging in music with other bands that were not in religious contexts. He also performed as a solo saxophonist at social functions.
In 2015 his formal music training continued when he engaged in music lessons with Innocent Mkuyuli, a pianist and music educator at the International School of Tanganyika.
His journey continued in music theory and practical musicianship on the tenor saxophone as a principal instrument, he continues with advancing to this present day.
Zephania has worked with bands like the Swahili Blues Band and performed at the Sauti Busara music festival in Zanzibar. He toured internationally with the band and performed with the King of Ethiojazz Mulatu Astatke at the African Jazz Village in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in 2015.
He has also accompanied a Jazz Music legend Tu Nokwe from South Africa during the Bagamoyo International Festival of Arts and Culture in 2015.
The music industry in Tanzania has evolved into much more opportunities for a committed musician to lead a successful career in music.

There is a calling for more instrumental and  music teachers are more performers.Technology  paves a way for artists to explore global markets in the music industry. Things have changed for the better.

Saxophonist Zephania Malembela
He has been featured in many albums by other artists both on religious and non-religious music arenas in Tanzania and outside Tanzania. He has been acclaimed by listeners and fans to have a rich tone with a special articulation on his instrument.
Currently, he is a member of the Pentanote Trio working with a renowned jazz pianist Barikeyz Mmbaga and his young brother John Mmbaga, a drummer.
 
He is working on his first solo instrumental album which focuses on a fusion of native music with western and jazz tastes. The album will be released soon.

 Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica , Zephania Melembela

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
What drives me is love. I am a product of love, love from the creator, love from my parents and from the society around me. All the love I received and continue to receive has taught me to value an adventure of becoming a good person and to love every human being by giving my best out of talents and potentials which are invested inside me, music being a major part of me.
How did you find your passion and how old were you? 
The passion has always been with me from the beginning. I come from a musical family, a family that for many generations has taken a leading role of music in its society. My mother, being the nearest of all other family members became my inspiration as she would sing, compose and teach song to a local church choir and she even played guitars very well.
At an age of 13 years I joined the choir she was leading and I started learning to play the keyboard and she was my first music teacher even though she had no formal music classes. She knew how chords were supposed to sound though she didn’t know how to play the keyboard.
We would search and combine the sounds of the keyboard to match the guitar chords that she made on the guitar. That is how it started and the rest is history.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
To be relevant to my world by doing the things that complement my talents and potential endowed inside me. Music being among them. To make life a meaningful adventure for me, my family and every other people I can get into contact whether physically or through other media like this.
 What drove you to make money from your passion?
I believe that someone doing his/her passion and being rewarded financially, for it is a sure way of growing the passion to its ultimate potential. This is what drives me to make money from my passion. My passion has to sustain me and to make my family’s life progressive in all spheres that need progress. This is how commitment to passion intensifies. It doesn’t make sense doing your passion with all efforts and then expect to sustain your own life with something else. This will only kill talents and potential and the passion itself altogether.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
It was when I was 22 years old. I had my first payment as a church musician for a church which was just being inaugurated. Later I have been able to extend my horizon beyond the four walls of the church to non-religious arenas musically.
As I said, money is just a reward. I am committed to my passion beyond monetary expectations. Making money is not a goal but money reward facilitates me to achieve the goals.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up? 
No! Giving up? How can someone give up on being themselves? If someone gives up on becoming themselves then who do they want to become as a result? My passion (Music) is who I am, I have never tried to think of giving up because it is like betraying myself and trying to become someone else.
Yes, there have been challenges in the journey and they are still coming even now but I try as much to solve them. It is in solving these challenge progress realizes. I solve my challenges and try to seek other people’s help when things get beyond my capacity. I enjoy working in teams that way.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 
To live an authentic life, to be who I am and to unleash my full potentials as a human being. Success is a process and not a destination. When I wind up my day being better than the previous day musically then I am successful and this continues that way to me, trying to improve myself more every day.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 
Doubt is a source of wisdom. For me, being doubted brought positive results. It created to me an avenue to question my inner man and to make a decision based on who I really am and what I am supposed to do with the gift of life I have been blessed with. Though their doubts I was able to find myself.
I will always listen to their doubts about me and I will then keep perfecting myself in order to become my best.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 
My advice to them is; Look for that reason, that special purpose, that mission you were created for and then build a beautiful life for yourself and those you love around that reason.
Listen to your inner man and be true to yourself. This will lead you to living your authentic life. It is the best reward that you can do to yourself. Be determined, be dedicated, be disciplined and be willing to sacrifice for that reason. All the rest will fall in their positions. You deserve to be happy, this is the cost of becoming one.

#CreateprenuerAfrica – Proudly Tanzanian Actor – Kihaka GND

 “”The time has arrived for Africa  to take on World Stage!”
KihakaGND
His is onboard a team and will feature a  lead character in “Shujaa, Kiroho Mtoto”-  A feature film in development set tp make the mark of the millineum!
Lupyana S Kihaka's acting career initiated when he was cast in a stage play, his very first acting role. 

This was a calling to take center stage in his country Tanzania, the beginning of creation.
He recently joined Waka Agency,  the first pan African talent agency founded by  #CreatePreneurAfrica , Rosie Motene from South Africa.

 Meet #CreatepreneaurAfrica Kihaka GND

Lupyana S Kihaka. kihakagnd@gmail.com Facebook: Kihaka GND. Instagram: Kihaka
 Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
 I love being a Tanzanian Actor. My passion is about creating a global network in the era of Africa uprising. My ultimate mission is to connect with professional filmmakers, actors, performers, and creatives on film platforms worldwide.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I was 18 years in Secondary Boarding School. Cast for a role in a stage play as an actor.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The fact that even though there are daily battles and struggles daily,  life goes on. I believe my acting career is my pathway to body mind and soul success. My purpose in this lifetime!
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Ultimately, time is a precious commodity, and you have to embrace every moment in this lifetime and not waste away hours making a living, doing something for money to fill your fridge. Why?
And you yourself barely get time to appreciate what you gathered. So getting paid to do something you love is far off from forced labor at the hands of masters. We are past that era
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
 It was 2011 when I got a role in a stage Play as Chief Makembo (a disable Chief) I was paid and awarded for a good performance… memories…..memories Haaaahaaa
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
 I never thought about giving up. Even though film industry got challenges, I will do my level best to show up a God-given talent
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I have connected with professional filmmakers worldwide and I am still connecting. Haaahaaa
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
Do not waste precious time, doubting undoubtedly.
 Stay alert Lupyana S Kihaka is an upcoming international Actor!
What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?
 The film Industry has many challenges all over the world It needs discipline and commitment. Be strong, Be You.
His creative soul rose above daily calamities before him and several roles came roaring his way in succession.
  2012: "SunShine", a film produced by Swahiliwood, in a Role Of GND.
2013-2014,  International series (Siri Ya Mtungi) Season. 

Produced by Swahiliwood. 

Written by Andrew Whalley (From Isidingo SA). 

Directed by Ron Garcia (from Hollywood USA)

2015  Dangerous SecreProduced by Cyber - Blitz, Lusaka, Zambia

 

2016 ‘Kiumeni Film

Featuring Ernest Napoleon & Idris Sultan (a BBA Maid 2014 Winner)

2017 'Chafu Tatu' produced by Bongo Hoods

 

He is inspired by all creatives from the motherland Africa.
“We are more than performers. We bring the real Africa to the world”
Kihaka GND

Take a step a few centuries back: Tanzanian Kilwa Kisiwani (isle of fish)

Welcome to Kilwa Kisiwani, a once upon a time a burgeoning empire, the most powerful and the biggest on the coast of East Africa. The ruins offer insight into once upon a time, labyrinth pathways, majestic mosques and grand palaces. 

A journey into the historic Kilwa is a discovery of incredible walls of wealth.  It may be away from usual tourist pathways, but offers magnificence outlook of living in past centuries.

The city reaching the shore is surrounded by walls and towers of about 12000 inhabitants. The luxurious setting of tree, gardens, every type of vegetable, and the best lemons. citrons and sweetest oranges ever.

The Kilwa isle – A  World Heritage Site

The Island of Kilwa, centuries ago, had trade routes ignited with its abundance of wealth. By the 20th century, it became uninhabited and forgotten. Foreigners and locals had no interest in the Tanzanian coastal ruins.

Around the 1950s,  Portuguese and Arabs, excavated the site to find objects of authenticity.  They succeeded in collecting coins dating back in time. The unique history of Kilwa is currently recognized as a treasure of Swahili history. In the year 1981, it was declared a World Heritage Site.

The Kilwa creation beginnings

The Kilwa Sultanate empire all started in the 10th century, Ali ibn al Hassan, the son of an Abyssinian slave and Emir of Shiraz was caught in a battle of inheritance with six other brothers.

Ali fled, settling on the island of Kilwa that was inhabited by indigenous Bantu dwellers. He began to construct his very own city.  According to legend, he bought Kilwa from the local King, who exchanged the island for enough cloth that would encircle the entire island.

By the time the king changed his mind, Ali already destroyed the bridge connecting Kilwa to the mainland and secured it for himself.

The ruling of Ali Shirazi continued until the year 1277 when the succession crisis led to Mahdali sultans taking over.The first three centuries there were many buildings like the Great Mosque that was started in 1100 and expanded.

Sixteen domes and ornate rooms of arches and pillars made an astonishing complex. When the Morrocan traveler Ibn Battuta visited the island in 1331 he was struck by the splendor of the mosque.

There are smaller mosques scattered all across Kilwa each with distinct features.

The isles ruin date back to the 14th century and early 15th century. Kilwa was a mercantile capital and the wealthy residents built extravagant coral dwellings.

A sultan is alleged to be buried in one of four tombs of the Great house. The triangular robust Makutini Palace was built in the 15th century.

A fortress on the island, Gereza, has wooden portals and elegant crenellation.  The striking ‘Husuni Kubwa’ ( Queen’s house) is perched on a cliff a mile away from the cluster of ruins.  It is said to be the largest pre-colonial Sub Saharan building. There is an 18 dome mosque, vast  hall, courtyards and swimming pool/ The complex has over 100 rooms

 The most powerful city on the East African coast the empire stretches from the north to the south from Kenya to Mozambique.

Ships brought in Arabian quarts, china porcelain, Indian carnelians and ivory and gold from Great Zimbabwe. Spices and perfume filled the air with tortoise shells and pottery in the market. It was the gateway between Asia and Africa.

There are three areas on the Tanzanian coast to add to an itinerary of colorful historic adventures and explore the ruins that go centuries back in time.

  • Kilwa Kisiwani
  • Kilwa Kivinje
  • Kilwa Masoko.

Kilwa Kisiwani

Remnants of extraordinary palaces, ancient tombs and crumbling mosques, the abandoned city of Kilwa Kisiwani is one of the main attractions on the isle.

Kilwa Kivinje

A little town on the mainland it was the center of slave trade in the south. Although slave trade was outlawed in 1873 it is said to have continued until 1880. Made into an administrative center when Germans occupied,

Travellers can explore World War One cannon leftovers as well as a market hall. There is an attractive beach with fisherman provide authentic insight of Tanzania.

Kilwa Masoko

Kilwa Masojo is usually a base when people visit the ruins in Kilwa Kisiwani with pleasant exploration if the Jimbizi Beach.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica