#CreatepreneurAfrica – Sandile Ngidi : ‘Africa’s Literary Empire’

Born  in South Africa on the Kwa Zulu Natal 'battlefields' of Vryheid, Sandile Ngidi grew up on the south coast of Durban, Amaholongwa.After matriculating at Marianhill High school he entered the literary kingdom.

His soul journey in the world of words led him on a freelance journalism pathway. He ventured into brand communication specialization and became a  dramatist and  Africa’s literary critic of note.

 Sandile wrote the concept paper towards the inception of South Africa’s Poet Laureate prize on behalf of the wRite Associates and the Department of Arts and Culture.

“I am driven by curiosity, a desire to partake in a bigger re-imagination of the human condition”  Sandile Ngidi

An avid advocate of literary translations, in 2006 he translated the classic Zulu novel by Sibusiso Nyembezi, Inkinsela yaseMgungundlovu (The Rich Man of Pietermaritzburg) from Zulu to English. He writes in Zulu and English. 

 

Aflame Books.

He was the editor of the Baobab Literary journal and Realtime youth magazine. His debut poetry collection is friends of the time.

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica – Sandile Ngidi: Africa’s literary King

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I am driven by curiosity, a desire to partake in a bigger re-imagination of the human condition.

How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

Words and the world of words entered my reality at home in my childhood, where my teacher parents always told stories about their world and also had books they used for school but were accessible to me as well.

Early on at high school in 1983, I began trying my hand in poetry. Mimicking really I guess,  but still expressing the conditions of black boyhood in apartheid South Africa.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The world of words, writing, theatre, books etc, all stir the mind and the soul.

What drove you to make money from your passions? 

Nothing really. Money has been incidental until I discovered that one has to support oneself at some stage.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

For my first newspaper article in the Natal Witness Echo in 1987, if I am not mistaken. This newspaper is influential in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands in South Africa, and to know that I could be paid for my passion was a pleasant surprise.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

To give up is to die.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I believe there is something worth contributing, worth the pain and the joy of creating and waiting to be heard. The written word is powerful, it can empower or marginalize, excite or ridicule – writers, especially in the digital age have become the “big eyes” through which the world is seen or hidden.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 

Nothing really at first. Money was incidental until I discovered that one has to support put bread on the table. I guess that is why I have for the better of my writing career, worked as a brand communication and public affairs specialist.

This has enabled me to consult with senior corporate and public sector executives. Clients often ask me to write speeches and opinion editorials. This job helps me convey messages to key target audiences anonymously.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 

Look deeper inside your self and try to bring the best of you. Systematically “murder” your hero as you learn the craft and bring more of you into the imagination pot.

You are valid. Polish your craft by reading, listening and writing every day. Not just for a pay or an applause. Read widely and listen to others more across many spheres of the human condition, the planet and the environment.

 

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

Feature Image by Hugh Mdlalose photography. Coming soon in the #Createpreneur Africa series,  A decade of  Hugh Mdlalose  Creations (photographer /videographer /musician) 

 

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica – La Famosà – Dominican fashion mogul in Uganda

Born in New York with family roots in the Dominican Republic, La Famosà was destined to link with the Waka agency founded by Rosie Motene, the first Pan African talent agency!

“People will appreciate my existence for creating avenues of revenues for the youth that seek lucrative opportunities”

La Famosà: Fashionist Extraordinaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Famosa set off to Uganda with her ultimate Pan-African vision was a mission to gather young women and men in the creations of the fashion world, to build an Africa network, gather ideas and support to inspire and grow through design and color.

“I love Africa, I love everything it’s offering me so far. I’m here to stay!

By the time she turned sixteen, she made it a mission to follow her dreams. She graduated from a technology high school, gained her cosmetology license and burst onto the world scene of fashion!

Her knowledge of hair design and fashion her repertoire as the most reliable and respectable stylist within the US.

A force to reckon with La Famosà spread out towards her screen career and created a  showreel for a reality TV show called: ‘Queens Reign Supreme’  and played the role of Sassy.

Her passion for Africa comes from a soul connection to family and friends alike.  Her love for Africa is contagious excitement she seeks to spread all over the world.

“I chose Africa because I have a vision that I will be the reason entrepreneurs will take control of what they want and need – Lanes will be created exclusively  for the next top designers”

She plans to attend university’s, high schools and middle schools in Africa with the aim to reach out to the youth, motivate them to stay in school and continue to excel.

The ultimate outlook is the creation of handsfree business programs for the inspiring goal achiever. Mold them into CEO in this 500,000,000,000 billion dollar beauty industry.

“I have the strategies, I just need the ones that have the willpower to make the industry go from billions to trillions of dollars” La Famosa

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica –  La Famosà in Uganda!

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

Making people happy, making people feel proud of themselves, changing their aspects on life, building confidence drives me to be better as a person.

It builds something in the way I conduct business. My true passions characteristics are based on how people react off of me and how I treat people. It’s become a lifestyle to reward people with my genuine ways.

I love the feeling when people take a second glance at what I’m
wearing or what I’ve said. It means interest, wondering how it all came about. It gives me a chance to stand up tall and express my desire to inspire.

How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

I found my passion at the age of 10 years old. I noticed it was a passion of mine when my mood changes every time I spoke about hair and fashion. It did something to me emotionally.

It took me away from my childhood nightmares.Whether it’s fashion, hair styling, consulting, anything to do with transforming people exteriors, it made me feel in control and complete as a little girl.

Something I looked up to. It became a dream of mine with hopes of it coming true one day.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me the most about my passion is that I can have a moment be my true self. Expressing myself through art.

I became a person that can advise and teach. It allowed me to make people feel good in my own creative way through creative designing. Introducing them to a new language. Fashion.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money from my passion was when I noticed my idols and my competitors achieving their business goals over and over and over again.. I knew that once I took my talents & skills serious along with making some adjustments to the way I conducted business. I knew right there and then that I can achieve the same. I never doubted my self.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

When I first got compensated for doing something I loved I was 15/16yrs old. I was overwhelmed and it motivated me to always push harder to stay afloat & above. From the age 10-16yrs old, I was hair designing but never got paid for it. I always did it for fun, practice, or just to distract me from my personal issues at home, knowing I was one day going to get paid for what is now my ultimate passion.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

The only thing that kept me going from never ever giving up was the constant monthly reminder. MY BILLS .. hahaha 😂😩. The more money I made, the more responsibilities I accumulated. I knew if I was to ever give up on my ambitious ways I’ll eventually lose everything I sacrificed everything for.

I had no one to depend on but my self and skills. The objective was to remain on top and remain responsible at the same time.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 

I feel like people that I surround my self, friends & family motivate me in so many ways to become more successful, whether it’s negative or positive happening in their lives. My mother didn’t really teach me the valuable lessons I know today. I learn from others peoples mistakes and achievements.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I wouldn’t relay a message to the people that doubted me. I’ll like to take the opportunity if given and give a big THANK YOU to everybody that knew I was going to make it.. those are the people I most appreciate, and thankful for. Positive vibes are what I feed off.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

My advice to the inspiring girl bosses, creative directors, goal achievers is to meditate on your idea, take a step back, set a goal that makes sense to self. Remain realistic, and stop nothing to achieving your goal. Good luck, I believe in you.We all will have a moment of doubt but always stay afloat and focus.

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Oluwabukola Michael Nelson, Making Nigerian dreams a reality!

Welcome to the world of Oluwabukola Michael Nelson, serial entrepreneur,  public speaker, business analyst and founder of the Africa democratic dreams project.

Oluwabukola Michael Nelson, a gospel instrumentalist and gospel praise leader sought to steer a pathway for Nigerians and Africans to realize their inner dreams through education, diplomacy, and peace.

From the age of ten, Oluwabukola Michael Nelson was a keen writer. He has featured in local and international media and lectured at churches and communities all over the world.

 Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica Oluwabukola Michael Nelson –  Reaching out for the rise of Nigeria

 

Tell us what drives you?

Change. I am very much in tune with the natural order of renewal, and so I see the opportunity to contribute to my general environment in partnership with others to bring growth, progress, and development.

What is your true passion in life?

My true passion in life is building businesses that produce both profits and socio-developmental progress. In essence, making money and improving lives of peoples and communities across the globe.

 How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I realized that I had a call to serve when I was a young skinny kid. I was raised by parents whose lives are committed to service to others.

My father served in the Nigerian armed forces and my mother raised me and my six siblings as a single mother through tough times and she never gave up on us. These experiences have shaped my perspective on life and have come to form my vision, mission, and goals in life.

 What about your passion appeals to you the most?

I am pleased at the fact that there are others like me – MLK, Obama, Mandela, Maya Angelou, Winnifred (Mandela), etc. I am comforted and inspired by the tracks these people leave behind. So even though my path is not the easiest, I can relate to the struggles and triumphs and final victories of these heroes.

What drove you to make money from your passions?
Being passionate about change without having the means to bring about that change is as useless as trying to clap with one hand. I realized this truth early in life and looking at the strategies adopted by philanthropists such as Bill Gates, James LeBron, Rihanna, and Warren Buffet validates that fact.
 When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Payment in monetary terms has always come through hard work. I have successfully launched businesses since the age of 18 and have staff members working for me and earning a salary.
I sponsored myself through college creating profit-making ventures. In terms of abstract rewards, when I look at how the things I have done have impacted the lives of individuals and communities, I get so much fulfillment than money can buy.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I could say that the challenges of life can be daunting and living a life of purpose is not for the faint of heart. Once you understand the principles of sacrifice and the principle of delayed gratification, you can surmount any obstacles. So for me having these principles imbibed and reading about the inevitable hurdles just like those before me gives me the confidence I need to keep going.
7. What motivates you every day to be even more successful
The belief that I CAN. The belief that nothing is impossible. The belief that I can do all things through Jesus Christ who gives me daily strength. The belief that I am living according to purpose. The belief that the world benefits from what I do daily. These are my daily motivators.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
It’s okay to doubt, but don’t get left behind. I am pressing on, you can too.
 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Believe in God and believe in yourself. Get up every day and do the things you love. Be happy. Live, Love and Learn.

#CreatepreneurAfrica Vincent Moloi : Trailblazer filmmaker capturing human existence dynamics!

 

South African born Vincent Moloi, was born shortly after the turbulent Soweto uprisings in 1976. His soul calling flourished into narratives of his motherland, voicing out the calling of the nation, both in fiction and non-fiction. 

The innovative filmmaker has directed over 50 documentary films and about 10 television series. He received numerous awards including African Trailblazer Award at the International TV Film festival,and MIPCOM in Cannes.  

His latest creation is Tjovitjo, is a drama series based on a world of hardships, dreams, problems, and hopes. It depicts everyday reality through the portrayal of dancers struggling against the system of poverty.

It offers a buffet of gripping emotions, topping the viewership charts and streaming in possibilities.

Vincent Moloi and his partner Lodi Matsetetela pitched the concept to almost every broadcaster in South Africa. All were reluctant a few years back.

Eventually, their passion drove them to fund it themselves, and they missioned to created it with their production company, Puo Pha Productions.

They then sold the series to SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), a national broadcaster in South Africa, retaining  100% copyright ownership.

An industry breakthrough of note, Puo Pha productions dominated at SAFTA’s, the (South African film and television Awards) ceremony in fiction and non-fiction

Skulls of My People,  a Puo Pha Production

  • Best documentary feature
  • Best director
  • Best Cinematographer

Tjovitjo, a Phu Pha Production

  • Best actor,
  • Best drama,
  • Best sound design
  • Best production design
  • Best editing
  • Best Cinematography

You can never really know it until you do it.

Vincent Moloi

Tjovitjo - drama pilot from Vincent Moloi on Vimeo.

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica Vincent Moloi, a filmmaker making waves

 

Tell us what drives you?

Given the times we’re living in, we as artists with influence, have an obligation to be responsible with the tools we have. So I am intent on unearthing and telling uncomfortable stories that will hopefully build us, or at least the future generations.

What is your true passion in life?

Happiness. I always seeking happiness but it is a very slippery emotion. And my family and telling stories are two things that bring me close to happiness. In general, I really like people around me to feel good about themselves. And I always try to include that element in my stories.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

My first love was radio. Very early on in my childhood, I remember how I use to sit outside my grandmother veranda and pretend to be a radio talk show host. So I always enjoyed telling stories and sharing my opinion. Sadly I never made it as a radio host, thank God there was filmmaking.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

Making people happy. I love seeing smiles on people. A smile is what all of us can have, poor and rich. You can’t just buy it.

 

What drove you to make money from your passions?

Hahahaha…sadly I am not at that stage where I am making money yet. At the moment I am still putting money into my passion. It will come when the time is right.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I can’t remember. It is probably because I put it back into my passion as an investment. We have just produced a whole drama series with our own money. This shows how passionate we are about we doing. We are still building for now, but one day we’ll reap the rewards of all the hard work and money we put in.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Failure is not an option. Because I can’t imagine anything else that can make me happy as what I do right now. The idea of failing terrifies me.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

A search for absolute happiness. I know it sounds so utopia but that’s what I want.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

That you can’t stop what naturally going to be.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

That they must learn to try things, do things. You can never really know it until you do it.

 Welcome, #ExploreMotherlandAfrica.

CreatePreneurAfrica – Botswana’s Donald Molosi’s “Critical love letters to Humanity”

It was a soul calling for Donald Molosi...born with a passion to spread the word. A renowned writer, playwright, and actor, he has been awarded over twenty-five acting awards internationally, fifteen writing awards and was the first Motswana to launch performances on Broadway.

“critical love letters” to humanity – Molosi describes his work in a BBC interview

In his viral essay “Dear Upright African”, Molosi explores the need for a liberated school curriculum in Africa. It is a calling for genuine African history in African classrooms.

He delivered a keynote address at the Bucknell University’s Black History month,  themed on the archives of post-Colonial African performance.

From an early age, Molosi sparked a flair for performance naturally. By the time he turned sixteen, he was already on the journey of touring with arts festivals and co-writing plays.

Molosi was the youngest to hit the airwaves when he became a Yarona Fm radio announcer.

He was a child presenter on Botswana Television in partnership with UNICEF to empower youth and make their voices count.

When he was seventeen, he wrote his solo performance, “Fragments,” based on children’s rights. The critically acclaimed  “Fragments” got him invited to the United Nations General Assembly on Children in New York and he performed  for world leaders like Kofi Annan and Nelson Mandela.

He continued to advocate for children’s rights through his  “Can I live” poetry exhibition, based on interpretations of the  African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child.[11

A language historian, Molosi is multilingual. He speaks Setswana, French, Swahili, and English. He is conversational in Ndebele and Zulu. His writings have shed light on the diversity if Africa in multiple narratives, debunking misconceptions of Africa.

He is currently represented by the  Pan African Waka Agency, founded by  award-winning actress and media proprietor from South Africa, Rosie Motene.

Theatre

  • 2003   Fragments

  • 2008   Blue Black and White

  • 2010 Today it’s me

  • 2013 Motswana: Dream again

  • 2017 Tumultuous

  • 2017 Yaguine and Fode project

  • 2017 Black Man Samurai

Filmography

2016 A United Kingdom

2009  Given

2007  Green Zone

  • 2006 Breakfast in Hollywood

His latest documentary, “We Are All Blue,”   an Africa Day premier on May 25, 2017, debuted all over Africa on DSTV, Multichoice. The documentary carries the final televised interview with the  late  Sir Ketumile Masire, former president of Botswana

It has premiered at the Ditshwanelo Human Rights festival and made a cinema debut in conjunction with the first Dalai Lama visit to Botswana.

Molosi shared the stage with Dalai Lama in the historic conference to explore the African way of life, Ubuntu/ Botho in the modern Botswana era. 

The  framework to heal the trauma of the colonialism and trauma  legacy, advancing in social justice and equality.

 

Molosi is also a songwriter and a singer and has a project lined up to showcase singing and songwriting.

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica Donald Molosi

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I am driven by the desire to live a life of purpose. My true passion is to express myself through writing and performance and I am elated to be having my passion as my profession, therefore.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

My passion found me before I was born. I knew at 4 what I would do with my life and it is exactly what I am doing today.

I have been performing all my life and my early start meant that by the time I was 15.  I was internationally recognized enough for me to address the UN General Assembly at that age.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

I don’t think of my passion as something that necessarily has to have a wholesome appeal to me. It is a calling and I need to fulfill it to keep my spirit and the world around me stable.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

The need to grow the same passion. The ability to finance my plays and films and still travel the world launching my books.

I monetize what I do purely so that I can invest in my talent and growth and have freedom as an artist without being held hostage by misguided sponsors. That is partly because I come from Botswana where a real artist can only survive by investing in themselves.\

In Botswana, there are two ways to survive as an artist, generally – either by corrupt means or by monetizing your talent.

That is why I enjoy working on Broadway and Hollywood half of every year because in the US you actually compete against other talent and the arts are not subject to the corrupt whims of politicians.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I definitely don’t recall the first time as I was below 10. I recall being extremely excited when I got my contract with Yarona FM when I was 15.

I was paid really well by Yarona FM even as a newcomer at the time. I was the youngest person on the radio at the time and the year was 2001.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I have had challenges but I am not sure that I ever wanted to give up. I operate in full knowledge that this is my life’s purpose and legacy.

So, even when I face challenges I go through them without shaking the core of what I do in the first place. And that is because I am clear about the legacy that my name should leave behind.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I only pursue success so that I can better help and mentor others. For me, success is never really for the individual alone.

I choose to live a life where I challenge myself to use every day to be there for myself and others. That motivates me to get up in the morning because that is work that is never finished.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I have nothing to say to them. I will let my work speak for itself and hopefully, they will learn from it the value of talent, hard work, and self-confidence.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

I advise them to speak from the heart and to speak truth to power. African artists are too silent about the lack of art academies in our nations for example, and yet we pour our taxes into our governments hoping they build one.

African creatives must stand up and let the African politicians that we see the lavish ways our corrupt leaders live on our taxpayers.

We must let them know that we will not tolerate that selfishness any longer while our industries suffer and countries like Botswana don’t even have a national theater after 50 years of being a country ….And yet we have the most fantastic corruption of national funds that my generation of Batswana has ever seen!

 

#CreateprenuerAfrica – Proudly Tanzanian Actor – Kihaka GND

 “”The time has arrived for Africa  to take on World Stage!”
KihakaGND
Lupyana S Kihaka's acting career initiated when he was cast in a stage play, his very first acting role. 

This was a calling to take center stage in his country Tanzania, the beginning of creation.
He recently joined Waka Agency,  the first pan African talent agency founded by  #CreatePreneurAfrica , Rosie Motene from South Africa.

 Meet #CreatepreneaurAfrica Kihaka GND

Lupyana S Kihaka. kihakagnd@gmail.com Facebook: Kihaka GND. Instagram: Kihaka
 Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
 I love being a Tanzanian Actor. My passion is about creating a global network in the era of Africa uprising. My ultimate mission is to connect with professional filmmakers, actors, performers, and creatives on film platforms worldwide.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I was 18 years in Secondary Boarding School. Cast for a role in a stage play as an actor.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The fact that even though there are daily battles and struggles daily,  life goes on. I believe my acting career is my pathway to body mind and soul success. My purpose in this lifetime!
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Ultimately, time is a precious commodity, and you have to embrace every moment in this lifetime and not waste away hours making a living, doing something for money to fill your fridge. Why?
And you yourself barely get time to appreciate what you gathered. So getting paid to do something you love is far off from forced labor at the hands of masters. We are past that era
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
 It was 2011 when I got a role in a stage Play as Chief Makembo (a disable Chief) I was paid and awarded for a good performance… memories…..memories Haaaahaaa
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
 I never thought about giving up. Even though film industry got challenges, I will do my level best to show up a God-given talent
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I have connected with professional filmmakers worldwide and I am still connecting. Haaahaaa
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
Do not waste precious time, doubting undoubtedly.
 Stay alert Lupyana S Kihaka is an upcoming international Actor!
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
 The film Industry has many challenges all over the world It needs discipline and commitment. Be strong, Be You.
His creative soul rose above daily calamities before him and several roles came roaring his way in succession.
  2012: "SunShine", a film produced by Swahiliwood, in a Role Of GND.
2013-2014,  International series (Siri Ya Mtungi) Season. 

Produced by Swahiliwood. 

Written by Andrew Whalley (From Isidingo SA). 

Directed by Ron Garcia (from Hollywood USA)

2015  Dangerous SecreProduced by Cyber - Blitz, Lusaka, Zambia

 

2016 ‘Kiumeni Film

Featuring Ernest Napoleon & Idris Sultan (a BBA Maid 2014 Winner)

2017 'Chafu Tatu' produced by Bongo Hoods

 

He is inspired by all creatives from the motherland Africa.
“We are more than performers. We bring the real Africa to the world”
Kihaka GND

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Poetically speaking : Mak Manaka

Never at a loss for words, renowned South African poet Mak Manaka tunes into soul rhyme in his rooted "arts for transformation" soul calling. 

Mak Manaka brings out the word,to the people....to the nation!
Mak Manaka @MakManaka  Award winning poet and writer.

Poetry-101-with-Mak-Manaka-and-Likwid-Tongue

His full name , Maakomele, means to represent in Pedi, and so he does! The motivating “warrior of inspiration” voices out  his poetically engaging word.

His late father was a poet, playwright as well as a painter. His mother an actress dancer and choreographer.  He was born into a realm of  ‘Art for social transformation.’

He has  proudly represented South Africa in Jamaica, Spain, and Cuba, and performed for the prolific Nelson Mandela as well!

Moving around on crutches due to a historic misfortune does not dampen his spirit as he ”words on”……..

Meet CreatePreneurAfrica- Mak Manaka

Tell us what drives you? 

It’s the knowledge that I’m alive and doing what makes me alive.

What is your true passion in life?

My true passion is the battle in articulating the conditions of truth. So the search for my true self is, in essence, my true passion.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

Well, passion found me in my mother’s womb and ever since I’ve been trying to understand why this passion. Coming from a family of artists, my late father is a playwright, painter and poet, and my mother a dancer-choreographer and an actress. So from an early age passion has been life to me.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

I’m yet to receive an answer from passion itself. One thing I know about passion is that it pays no bills but it does make rainy days seem like summer skies. I guess it’s the self-fulfillment of self-worth that appeals to me the most.

 What drove you to make money from your passions?

Like I said, passion pays no bills. Self-determination pays the bills, not my passion. I think it’s important for us to unpack the meaning and function of the word passion to ourselves. How do you understand your passion and is it passion or self-determination that makes earns you a living within the construct of capitalism?

 

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

To be honest with you, I’m still waiting for the day I get paid for my passion and I doubt that day will come coz my passion is nor for sale. On the other hand, I was about 21 when I got my first paycheck for a performance, poetry articulates condition, then it is my honor and privilege to have such a gift and be paid to share it.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?  

It is the thought itself that keeps me going. We don’t give up or give in at any point coz we are suns, who wear heat in our hearts. Giving up is not an option but to give and share the heat with others is our main purpose as Africans.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

The love for loving life…

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Don’t doubt your self, rather support your self and buy my books.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

“Look not to the stars but to your self” coz “to thine self, be true”-Shakespeare said both those quotes a long time ago and before I can tell anyone anything I have to tell my self. So before you leave the house, look at yourself and smile and be in love with the mirror. In the mirror is the sun inside looking back at you, so look to self to be selfless.

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Visionary Soul Filmmaker Jihan El Tahri

Egyptian filmmaker Jihan El Tahri,rich in roots of diversity and a wealth of world experience,takes us on her soul rhythm journey, a mission to ignite the spirit of the Motherland Africa.

Tuning into insight and wisdom, she captures the heart of African roots beyond maintream media definitions and prescriptions related to what Africa was and wasn't, or what it is and should be.

Starting her career as a journalist, Africa’s legendary filmmaker, Jihan El Tahri. initially worked as a television researcher and news correspondent, covering the politics in the Middle East. This is when she realized the new dawn was on the power of the visual medium.

@Jihantahri Filmmaker, Writer, Producer, Visual Artist …without music nothing gets done!

She then launched into independent filmmaking,  producing and directing documentaries for French Tv, PBS, BBC and a range of other broadcasters internationally.

She has directed over a dozen films including award-winning:

The House of SaudThe Price of Aid, which won the European Media prize in 2004 and

Cuba: An African Odyssey.

The award-winning,”Behind the Rainbow”  explores transition in South Africa.

It chronicles the liberation project of the African National Congress and compromises that eventually led to the historic 1994 elections, the eventual erosion of promises and dreams, raising questions about the present era.

Egypt’s Modern Pharaohs

 

Jihan El-Tahri has also authored two books  The 9 Lives of Yasser Arafat and Israel and the Arabs: the 50 Years War.

She is also an avid visual artist with several exhibitions scheduled throughout the year.

Africa cinema is her passion, telling stories from Africa, for the people by the people.

Filmmaking  comes with pain, heartaches and minimal returns…. but when a film is complete it allows a person  to voice,  to exist, and to be heard, and that makes it worth it when your film continues to make sense, even years later.

 

Meet # CreatepreneurAfrica: Let’s hear it from the legendary filmmaker Jihan El Thari

1. Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

To your first question, what drives you and what your true passion is in life?…..

It’s hard to say what my true passion is….because I guess they all intertwined but talking about film and documentary…

I think what really drives me is a real desire to understand and know and chronicle what happened in the whole post-independence periods.  Why is it the promises and the vision of that moment of independence  that was going to give the people of the continent and the colonized people everywhere….the quality freedom and dignity?Why did not happen, why is that we still there today, I guess that’s the driving question,

but passion if it’s just about what I really am passionate about

  • I’m passionate about music
  • I’m passionate about film
  • I’m passionate about art

So yeah…..I dabble in all three.

 

2. How did you find your passion and how old were you?
Listening to Jihan

#CreaterPreneurAfricaJihanTahriQuestion2

How old was I when I found my passion?

I guess my passion meaning documentary, well like in 1990, so I must have been…..I guess I was ..26 at that time… 1990.

It was during the Gulf war, as a journalist I was covering the Gulf war, and I immediately realized that the game had been overtaken by TVs and no matter how much we wrote, no matter how much we researched, one image was more powerful than anything one did.

But that was just about the image, the way of making films, I think it was a big revelation for me when I saw this film  called “Death of Yugoslavia”, it was educational, it was interesting, it was funny and most of all it finally made sense of what was happening in Yugoslavia.

The war had been on for a few years and the more it went on the more one realized well I don’t understand anything,  so you just left it behind, zapped it …

Suddenly then there was this documentary, that put it together in a way where I could actually understand, and then you started making sense,  and I could take a position. I could think for myself that was the key, thinking for myself.

I guess that’s when I  really started making the kind of films that I make because  I never give conclusions. Its really about trying to chronicle how things happen and how we got there, and once you understand that, from there a person can decide for themselves, where they stand in that particular event.

 

3. What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

#CreateprebeurAfricaJihanTahriQuestion3

What is it that appeals to me most… RESEARCH.  I think I’m really passionate about research mainly because what I really want to do is try and look at stories from a different perspective,  because we’ve been told our stories the whole time through Western eyes, through Western stories.

And when I approach a topic what I really try to do most is see it from our own perspective from a southern perspective from the perspective of the people who actually lived it, rather than the colonial masters or the cold war protagonists.

So I try  and  get to that prism of the story, and so the research cannot just rely on the books and  newspapers and the documents  because they all written from a Western perspective , so one really has to get down to declassifying document,s get down to finding first-hand eyewitnesses finding stuff  that was written in different languages.

I  mean, I’m lucky because I can speak four or five languages, I can actually read in these languages what was written by the people themselves, whereas it’s not the case if you only speak English or French you only get that one perspective.

Yes, so that’s what appeals to me the most.  And I also love putting together the film at the end…at the end of the day the film is made in the editing, you have a narrative you know where you going, but because of time constraints and how it’s going to broadcast.

The film itself is made in the editing and it’s not my favorite part when I have to cut things down, but that first moment of the editing when I lay down the whole story as it was told to me is quite a big moment for me.

4. What drove you to make money from your passions?

#CreatepreneurAfrica JIhanTahriquestion4

I’ll actually answer 4 and 5 together, what drove you to make money from your passion well I don’t actually make money from my passion unfortunately for me.

I guess I could make money if I did it more superficially, but it does take me four to five years to make a film, and because of that most of the time I don’t get paid anything reasonable even.

Just for an anecdote: When I finished “Behind the rainbow”, my accountant as we finalized the account,  and as I was walking out, he stopped he said,  you do realize that the cleaning lady  earned more than you did on this film?”

And it’s because she obviously got paievery timeme she worked.  I had a lumpsum, which is fine in one year but when stretching over  four years, you barely make ends meet …which accounts for me doing other things on the side like teaching and so forth,, so that’s question 4…

5.When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

When was the first time I was paid for my passion? I’m going to stick to the documentary but I could also say photography, my very first job.

When I was 19 was as a photographer and I remember clearly, I was working for Reuters, and my first salary paid for taking pictures that I thought was the most amusing thing as I would have paid to go take these pictures, but now I was being paid to do that.That was when I first started working as a photographer at Reuters, that must have been in 1984 or something.

In documentary when I started documentary, I was already a professional in the sector, so obviously I got paid, meaning I had budgets in which I got paid if there was any leftover!

6. What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

#CreatepreneurAfricaJihan TahriQuestion6

I thought about giving up many times, especially in the middle of the film when things go completely out of sync.

“Behind the rainbow” was a good example, when for six months, absolutely everyone I had interviewed for research and was a 1oo percent onboard of the film suddenly when I came back with a camera, nobody wanted to talk.

It took about six months for me to get the first interview and my cameraman whose German had come to South Africa for the shoot and instead of 26 or 27 days he was paid for the shoot he stayed for six months. That was a very depressing moment.

And my co-producer, Steven Markovitch from Big world cinema, you know, as a producer, he realised that we couldn’t go on like this and everyone wanted to  shut down the project but I’d went too far, I spent already three years, and there was no way I wasn’t going to make that film, especially because I thought it was an important film.

So the short answer to what motivates me  to keep going when I think  should give up, is because I don’t just make films , I really grapple with topics that I think are important for me and people like me,  people who believe in Africa, people who want a better future , so I guess that’s what keeps me going.

 

7. What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

#CreatePreneurAfricaJiahnTahriQuestion7

What motivates me every day to be even more successful?

I don’t actually think of myself as successful.  I just feel I’m lucky to do what I do. and I put my whole heart in it. I’m not sure what successful means because depending on the criteria I m actually not successful at all.

I don’t earn enough money to keep me going’,  so I’m lucky that I have multiple things that I do because it keeps me floating but I engage with what I believe in and what I love and do it to the fullest.

For the past year, for example I’ve been doing visual arts. I started about five years ago, but over the past year I’ve  basically only been doing exhibitions and visual art projects,  and I’ve done at least four exhibitions that year and I have four or five to come this year,  and I love each and everyone, they’re different topics.

And I guess it’s being able to use different formats in order to deal with all the questions you have personally and try to find a way to express them.

So as much as my documentaries are extremely talkative,  my visual arts work or my contemporary arts work there isn’t a single words its just visual, I think having an alternative format to grapple with more or less  same issues is wonderful, so I put my whole heart into it and try to do it as best as I can

8.What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

# CreatePreneurAfricaJihanTahri question8

 

The people who doubted me……  well I guess there’s people who still doubt me. People will always doubt others, but what will I tell them?……. I’ll tell them good luck, go find your own passion and go do something beautiful and that you believe in.

I don’t really pay attention to people who doubt me or don’t doubt me because I don’t particular…I guess…care..

I don’t care. what I’m seen as, as long as I’m doing what I think is the right thing and as long as I don’t overstep boundaries, not politically speaking of course, but overstep boundaries like don’t  forecast in terms of cultural and other things.

I most of the time work with stories that I believe in and care about but I’m not part of the community I’m talking about, like for example my film about Zambia or my film about South Africa.

I lived there I cared about it but I’m a not Zambian and I’m not South African, so I do care about not overstepping cultural borders, that in order for my work to remain relevant, in order for the people from that place identify with it too. but obviously you never win everybody and if you do win everybody  over….then you’ve done something wrong, as there is always one side of the story that wants negate the other,

 9.What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

CreatePreneurAfrica JihanTahriQuestionairre9

 

I must say I get very touched  and almost embarrassed now that my age is advancing, young people come up to me  and tell me that you know  that look up to me or  that I inspire them, it’s very touching  because I guess one never thinks that work one does will resound on a much larger scale

 

What do I have as advice….. I  basically will repeat what I have said over and over hold on to the stories you care about and go out and find  out  about them,

Don’t let people tell you what they about, go find your own angle go expose find discover engage with what matters to you,  and I think even when people tell you oh you not the right person to do so,,oh you this oh you not allowed  that,  forget about all this something that you feel matters to you.

Go out and get it, and give it time and give it love, AND I UNDERLINE, GIVE IT TIME…because in our day and age its much more time than money makes a difference.

Money is obviously important but money is the way lots of people sell there soul, so if you care about something go find money in a different sector, but with your passion, give it TIME, give it LOVE.

And  if it doesn’t give you enough money,  don’t sell your soul for money, get the money somewhere else we all have multiple skills, so find that skill, I’ve translated, I worked as a driver …..I’ve done everything under the sun when I needed money, there’s no shame in working, so follow your passion.

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Pan Africa media proprieter – Our Voice of Africa : Rosie Motene

Rosie Motene,  actor, radio and tv presenter has taken  Africa to the world stage.

No jokes.... the accredited international laughter coach, has excelled the media world as a speaker, global emcee and author of note.


And she has summited Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa more than once! Rosie joined the Africa Unite Campaign to stop violence against women and girls in Africa. She summited Kilimanjaro in 2014 to raise awareness for the Tomorrow Trust

“We all have our own journeys and its important to create that but also at your own pace””

She runs a podcast series, Pan African Connect, engaging with
topics in line with her three passions in
life….. Women, Africa, and the arts.

Another achievement reaching heights is when she founded the first Pan African talent agency, Waka talent agency, representing the multitude of talent from the motherland of Africa, from television presenters, brand ambassadors, digital influencers emcees, and speakers.

ACHIEVEMENTS AND AWARDS

South African Style Awards 2003:

Rosie Motene
Most stylish media personality.

2006

Rosie Motene
Top 5 best dressed
women in South Africa.

N a l e d i T h e a t r e
Awards

Rosie Motene

Award for
role in The Vagina Monologues.

L e g e n d s A w a r d s Ceremony:

R o s i e  Motene

L i f e – t i m e
Achievement Award.

The TAVA:
WAF 2013:
Best producer award and Best African film for
“ Man on Ground” featuring Hakkem Kae Kazim

Women’s advancement forum

Rosie Motene:

Award for her efforts
in fighting against women abuse at the

 

HOTEL RWANDA

Big screen  debut ,
for the Oscar-nominated  film,Hotel Rwanda,



THE OTHER WOMAN

Rosie played the lead in The Heartlands
film, directed by Cindy Lee and lensed
by Lance Gewer who lensed Tsotsi.


NOTHING BUT THE
TRUTH:
Lead actor alongside
Jon Kani in  the filmic adaptation of his
theatrical piece.

 

GENERATIONS: South African Broadcasting Corporation ( SABC1)

BUBOM SANNA:   A drama series themed on aspiring models

TV TOWN: A  television drama for children

STRAY BULLET:

MNET New directions
Patrick Shai film

ZABALAZA: Mzansi magic
show.
Broadcasting Venture

NTV & Spark TV Uganda

Head of productions, programming and acquisitions.


Meet CreatepreneurAfrica- Rosie Motene- Shining Light on Africa

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

Women, Africa, and the arts.

I love being a woman and I am incredibly proud of who I have become. As I
have moved into my 40’s I’ am loving and cherishing the inner strength and
power that I have.
I simply love our continent from his challenges, hidden treasure and power
that it holds.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was a dancer as a child and completed my exams all the way to teachers
level.
After school, I was accepted into the BA dramatic arts and it was at the end of
my first year when a friend pushed me to audition for a play. On the curtain
call on the premiere night, being on that stage, I realized that that was where I
needed to be.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

mmm…… the fact that I can live, eat and breathe it. I can incorporate it into my
everyday life.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

I strongly believe that if you are not passionate about your career and work, you will be unhappy and bored. So over the last decade, I only work on passion-driven projects

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I was in a beacon chocolate advert, whilst studying at Wits.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I have never thought about giving up. I believe that talent is a gift and for me to
give up on that gift from God, would be an insult.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I have inspired many women from all around the world. I am also aware that
my life can be taken away at any point and so every day I aim to live my best
life.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Hahahahaha it’s not about you but thanks for the push and drive.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

Take time to discover you, create a path that defines you and feeds your passion.
Build a thick skin and go out and be whomever you want to be.

#CreatePreneurAfrica-Meet Africa’s Fastest Rising Scientist : Emmanuel Obayagbona

Africa’s fastest rising scientist has his findings widely published in over one hundred and twenty countries, as well as the “Chicago Carbon Capture” report.Featured in leading Nigeria media platforms, he is the CEO of Spirate Engineering and the founder of Spirate Tech, ready to launch a new generation of aspiring youngsters into electrical dimensions for the future of Africa.

Welcome to the world of CreatepreneurAfrica – our Scientist Emma!

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drove me into my inventing is passion and determination. I have the passion for inventing something new into the world. I  am fulfilled when I solve people’s problem with my inventions. That is why all must follow passions in life.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

 I found my passion right from a tender age. That was when I was in primary school called DSC model nursery, and a primary school in Orhuwhorun, Warri Delta state.

I initially found myself producing dusters that my teacher used in cleaning the chalkboard that was used for many years… and a torchlight….  lol….memories of yesterday.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

Well,  the passion that appeals to me the most is the act of producing electrical and electronic gadgets. I have this love for electronics design as far back as when I was in secondary school, called Challenge Academy Secondary School , DSC, Ovwian Aladja.

I used to produce handset charger with torchlight, and I was into the production of producing inverters and battery chargers far back….That was SO many years ago.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

 Actually what drove me in making money from my passion was that sometimes I went financially down and I noticed that it cost money to purchase materials.  That made me start producing some product like the torchlight battery, lanterns and so on.  I sold them and use the money I actualize to produce new products and also solve my financial problems.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

Smiles….That was so many years ago that was during my secondary school days then I improved on the version of torchlight I usually produced.

Then, in my primary school and sold it to one man known as Chika’s father. He bought it at N500 Naira ( Nigeria currency) so it motivated me to produce more and I continued selling them as demand increased.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going when I thought of giving up was the encouragements so many people were giving to me. Some usually tell me that I have a brighter future and that I will go far in life if I don’t give up.

Sometimes when there is no money to buy materials to produce something, I will feel like giving up. Because of the passion for electronics design, I continue encouraging myself till I scale through it.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Actually what motivates me to be more successful is that whenever I produced something and it worked, it motivates me to do more. Nothing motivates a man other than whatsoever he produces works.

For instance, Deutsche Welle (DW) Germany via eco@Africa rated me the fourth position in the world amongst the top five solar energy inventions from Africa in 2017.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

 Well, what I have to say to all those who doubted me is that they should cultivate the habit of encouraging fellow inventors like me and stop doubting them!

A lot of people who doubted me now see that I’m one of the fastest rising  scientists on our Motherland of Africa, and they  wonder why my findings were widely published in journals of over 120 Countries through the carbon capture report Chicago, USA and in some Nigerian Newspapers such as:

  • African leadership magazine
  • IT- Tech Africa Magazine
  • The Ambassador Magazine
  • Model Path Magazine
  • Efric Entrepreneur magazine
  • Herald magazine
  • Voice of Nigeria Script
  • The Guardian Newspaper – April 1st, 2017
  • The Nation Newspaper – May 2nd, 2012
  • The Sun Newspaper – October 14th, 2015 and 26th January 2016
  • The Oracle Newspaper – November 29th, 2017
  • The Champion Newspaper – February 4th, 2012
  • The Pointer Newspaper – September 23rd, 2013
  • The Truth Newspaper – October 10th 2012 and November 28th, 2014
  • The Advocate Newspaper – September 10th 2013,
  • Vintage Newspaper – November 8th, 2014,  among others.
  • BBC World Service – March21st2014
  • DwtvGermany – December16th2017
  • DwtvEspañol Spanish – December15th2017
  • DwtvAfrica – December15th2017
  • Channels Tv Uk In Eco @ Africa – December15th2017
  • NTA International Ntai (Weekend Deal) – March 2016
  • AIT International on Digivision – September 2017
  • AIT international on O&M TV Show, June 2016
  • Core TV International – September 2016
  • Rave Tv International – November 2017
  • Voice of Nigeria (VON) West Africa – December23rd201
  • Delta Rainbow Television Warri – September 2013
  • NTA Ado-Ekiti – November 2016
  • Dream FM 92.8 Enugu State Nigeria with Uncle  Jude Thomas Dawam
  • Solid FM 100.6 Enugu State Nigeria WithDrChristian Enebe
  • Radio Delta with Greg Amona, Mudiaga Asaba

My International Television program

They also have seen that I have been featured in almost all the top leading National and International media such as:

BBC World Service – March  21st, 2014
DwtvGermany – December 16th, 2017
DwtvEspañol Spanish – December 15th, 2017
DwtvAfrica – December 15th, 2017
Channels Tv Uk In Eco @ Africa – December 15th, 2017
NTA International Ntai (Weekend Deal) – March 2016
AIT International on Digivision – September 2017
AIT international on O&M TV Show, June 2016
Core TV International – September 2016
Rave Tv International – November 2017
Voice of Nigeria (VON) West Africa – December 23rd, 2013
Delta Rainbow Television Warri – September 2013
NTA Ado-Ekiti – November 2016
Dream FM 92.8 Enugu State Nigeria with Uncle  Jude Thomas Dawam
Solid FM 100.6 Enugu State Nigeria WithDrChristian Enebe
Radio Delta with Greg Amona, Mudiaga Asab

Currently, I’m the C.E.O of Spirate Engineering and also the founder of Spirate Tech Foundation committed to imparting teenagers with technical skills.

I have equally engaged in efforts geared towards empowering the youth to be self-reliant towards in the area of Technology

  • Fourth position worldwide among Top five solar energy inventions from Africa in 2017 – DW Germany.
  • Holder of the prestigious award of model personality
  • Award of one of the 50 most influential young people in Enugu state
  • Afrihub Award on Ca-talk IMT Chapter Enugu state NigeriWestst Africa
  • Spe Oil & Gas section 103 Rivers state award.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

The only advise I have to give to aspiring creative minds that look up to me is:

No matter the challenges you are going through or facing at the moment please don’t ever give up. Remember: “Winners don’t quit and Quitters don’t win” 

~ Scientist Emmanuel Obayagbona

Biodiverse Rich Coastal Forest in Tanzania: Pugu Hills

 

Pugu Forest reserve in the Pwani region of Tanzania is adjacent to the Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve.These forests are considered as the oldest in the world!

There is never a shortage of places to go outside of Dar es Salaam that will take at least four hours of driving, besides the beaches, of course…a great privilege for any city.

A coastal forest reserve situated 20km from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania might not be part of traditional tour routes in Tanzania, yet it attracts a fair number of visits.  Often visited by biologists, it is a  top forest in Africa for bird conservation.

 

A 20-minute drive from the Julius Nyerere airport, the main attractions include a sacred cave of the Zaramo people, a cattle market, and fascinating bat caves, the historical remains of Colonial times including a railway tunnel and  Kaolinite industry an off course, the forest.

 

Kaolin deposits of high quality lie below Pugu Hills in the Kisarawe district. These resources are untapped despite a growing demand worldwide. Local and foreign geologists have confirmed Kaolin deposits of  2.3 billion metric tonnes.

Biodiversity richness is high with a wide range of plants, birds, reptiles, insects, and birds.

There are about fourteen known endemic plants, two endemic mammal species, and an endemic subspecies of birds.  Wildlife includes Masaai giraffes, elephants, impalas, warthogs, Tanzanian cheetahs, Africa leopards, spotted hyenas, mongooses, elephant shrews, galagos, civets, side strapped and black back jackals, and over eighty species of birds as well as bat colonies dwelling in the caves.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

Mount Meru: Tanzania cultural tour expeditions- exploring Tengeru

 

Nearby picturesque Mount Meru slopes, the second highest peak in Tanzania, lies Tengeru, 13km from Arusha on the path to Moshi.

It is simply the best base to explore cultural attractions that make up the rich heritage of the Meru tribe in Tanzania.

There are farms, banana fields and traditional homesteads on the mountain. This village near Arusha is distinct in character.

The venture is set forth exploring old coffee farms with local production of the world’s popular beverage with and then canoe into a  volcanic lake at Mount Meru foothills, home to the best birdwatching and fishing sites.

Ready to give back to communities around Kilimanjaro? Volunteer programs are on offer at all local schools in the surrounds of Mount Kilimanjaro, venture out and discover development and upliftment projects in the Tengeru Community.

Tengeru Activities

Coffee Tour

One of the major highlights in Tengeru is enjoying special home-brewed coffee with the locals.

The coffee plantations in Tengeru journey leads curiosity ventures into local homes and lessons to prepare coffee. The tour offers specially harvested coffee from the Meru community on volcanic Mout Meru foothills.

Lake Duluti Safari Tours

A close view of vegetation in Tengeru with an abundance of fauna and flora at the lakeside. Learn about mystical Meru legends and mysteries linked to Lake Duluti. Get a front seat view of birds, monkeys, reptiles, many other animals, and plants.

This tour will give you an up-close view of Tengeru’s vegetation and you will able to admire the abundant lakeside fauna and flora. You can learn about the Meru legends linked to the lake and its mysteries while getting a front-row viewing of the monkeys, birds, reptiles and many other animals whilst learning about our plant life. A magical destination of authentic traditional roots.

Tengeru Market Tour

The colorful community market, interact live and eat amongst the locals. The busiest market days are Wednesdays and Saturday

Conservation programs in Tengeru

Environment programs in a land rich with vegetation. A source of survival. The main issue is deforestation threatening ecology and the community. Participate in environmental programmes and enjoy a luscious waterfalls tour relaxing in nature marvels

Forest Tours at Mount Meru

The second highest mountain in Tanzania m Mount Meru boasts beautiful forests. Unwind and enjoy magnificence. It is a great destination for preparing for Mount Kilimanjaro expeditions

Walk through the forests of Tanzania’s second-highest mountain.

"Mringaringa" Tour

A traditional gathering place, “Mringaringa”. Listen to the wisdom of thrilling Meru culture and traditional dancing. This venue is also used for settling disputes in the community with presiding Meru elders.

Local Food Preparation and Traditional Dances

Soul soothing music and food celebrations with traditional dancing guarantee a worthwhile experience.

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

.

 

 

Take a step a few centuries back: Tanzanian Kilwa Kisiwani (isle of fish)

Welcome to Kilwa Kisiwani, a once upon a time a burgeoning empire, the most powerful and the biggest on the coast of East Africa. The ruins offer insight into once upon a time, labyrinth pathways, majestic mosques and grand palaces. 

A journey into the historic Kilwa is a discovery of incredible walls of wealth.  It may be away from usual tourist pathways, but offers magnificence outlook of living in past centuries.

The city reaching the shore is surrounded by walls and towers of about 12000 inhabitants. The luxurious setting of tree, gardens, every type of vegetable, and the best lemons. citrons and sweetest oranges ever.

The Kilwa isle – A  World Heritage Site

The Island of Kilwa, centuries ago, had trade routes ignited with its abundance of wealth. By the 20th century, it became uninhabited and forgotten. Foreigners and locals had no interest in the Tanzanian coastal ruins.

Around the 1950s,  Portuguese and Arabs, excavated the site to find objects of authenticity.  They succeeded in collecting coins dating back in time. The unique history of Kilwa is currently recognized as a treasure of Swahili history. In the year 1981, it was declared a World Heritage Site.

The Kilwa creation beginnings

The Kilwa Sultanate empire all started in the 10th century, Ali ibn al Hassan, the son of an Abyssinian slave and Emir of Shiraz was caught in a battle of inheritance with six other brothers.

Ali fled, settling on the island of Kilwa that was inhabited by indigenous Bantu dwellers. He began to construct his very own city.  According to legend, he bought Kilwa from the local King, who exchanged the island for enough cloth that would encircle the entire island.

By the time the king changed his mind, Ali already destroyed the bridge connecting Kilwa to the mainland and secured it for himself.

The ruling of Ali Shirazi continued until the year 1277 when the succession crisis led to Mahdali sultans taking over.The first three centuries there were many buildings like the Great Mosque that was started in 1100 and expanded.

Sixteen domes and ornate rooms of arches and pillars made an astonishing complex. When the Morrocan traveler Ibn Battuta visited the island in 1331 he was struck by the splendor of the mosque.

There are smaller mosques scattered all across Kilwa each with distinct features.

The isles ruin date back to the 14th century and early 15th century. Kilwa was a mercantile capital and the wealthy residents built extravagant coral dwellings.

A sultan is alleged to be buried in one of four tombs of the Great house. The triangular robust Makutini Palace was built in the 15th century.

A fortress on the island, Gereza, has wooden portals and elegant crenellation.  The striking ‘Husuni Kubwa’ ( Queen’s house) is perched on a cliff a mile away from the cluster of ruins.  It is said to be the largest pre-colonial Sub Saharan building. There is an 18 dome mosque, vast  hall, courtyards and swimming pool/ The complex has over 100 rooms

 The most powerful city on the East African coast the empire stretches from the north to the south from Kenya to Mozambique.

Ships brought in Arabian quarts, china porcelain, Indian carnelians and ivory and gold from Great Zimbabwe. Spices and perfume filled the air with tortoise shells and pottery in the market. It was the gateway between Asia and Africa.

There are three areas on the Tanzanian coast to add to an itinerary of colorful historic adventures and explore the ruins that go centuries back in time.

  • Kilwa Kisiwani
  • Kilwa Kivinje
  • Kilwa Masoko.

Kilwa Kisiwani

Remnants of extraordinary palaces, ancient tombs and crumbling mosques, the abandoned city of Kilwa Kisiwani is one of the main attractions on the isle.

Kilwa Kivinje

A little town on the mainland it was the center of slave trade in the south. Although slave trade was outlawed in 1873 it is said to have continued until 1880. Made into an administrative center when Germans occupied,

Travellers can explore World War One cannon leftovers as well as a market hall. There is an attractive beach with fisherman provide authentic insight of Tanzania.

Kilwa Masoko

Kilwa Masojo is usually a base when people visit the ruins in Kilwa Kisiwani with pleasant exploration if the Jimbizi Beach.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

Our City of Clay in Africa – Djenne in Mali

 

A UNESCO world heritage site, the ancient town,Djenne in the heart of  Mali,stands on Africa's mighty River Niger. A city of mud houses, streets and city walls. The ochre mud composition gives out an embezzling monochrome look.

 

 

 

The journey to Djenne is like stepping into another era. Little has changed since its prosperous 14th and 15th-century heydays.

Djenne on the flood lands of the Bani and Niger rivers is about 220 miles south-west of Timbuktu. Before  1591, Djenné became a prosperous center of slave, ivory and gold trade. Known as the oldest city in Sub Sahara Africa,  famous for its Great Mosque and market.

It was founded around 800AD by merchants and flourished. The meeting place for Sudan desert traders and Guinea tropical forests, it became an impactful trading center and thrived due to its direct river connection with Timbuktu and the head of all trade routes leading to salt and gold mines.

Controlled by empires of Morrocan kings it expanded featuring products from the north and central Africa until the French occupied in in 1893.

Commercial functions were then taken over by Mopti town in the confluence of Bani and Niger rivers, in the northeast,  An agricultural trade center, Djenne boasts Muslim Architecture and a great mosque.

The great mosque built in 1905 is a classic Sahelian mud architecture.

The highlight of each year is an event when annually, the inhabitants of the town gather and refine the mud structure, giving it a new layer to replace what torrential rains fade out. The festival of plastering event: La Fete de crepissage. 

The labors of plasterers are accompanied with a beating of drums. The drums are perched on wooden spikes that stick out of the walls, serving as permanent scaffolding and decoration.

Younger girls carry bowls and buckets  of water and mud from the river bed, and older women pound millet making pancakes,

Special meals are made by each family to celebrate the occasion. Proud of their architectural heritage the people of Djenne have long resisted paved roads and any introduction of electricity.

Only a handful of cars exist in Djenne belonging mostly to government officials that run development programmes for sustainability.

All new buildings and even the hospital are built in traditional style and technique binding the river mus with straw and grass

The building material is plentiful and cheap and the clay keeps houses cool, even with the scorching hot sun outside.

Labor for repairing is becoming a challenge in present day when most move into cities with computers, email, and television.

The architectural gem receives foreign aid to maintain its splendor and keep it the same, for another two decades and more!

Welcome!  #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

CreatePreneurAfrica -Tastebud treats from Chef Li

READY WITH A SENSATIONAL MENU  to tantalize all TASTEBUDS, meet Createpreneur Africa, Chef Li.

Linda Nirina Rojohasina Mazibuko, born in the culturally and culinary diverse island of Madagascar, eventually relocated to her father’s homeland, South Africa. Chef Li’s cooking styles from multiple influences topple divine and delectable taste sensations.

Growing up with her mother, a musician from Madagascar, and her grandmother in South Africa , her Zulu heritage was a divine fusion into the mixture of Madagascar cooking style delights.

A member of ‘Çhefs in Africa’ she ranked amongst the top ten of Top Chefs in SA.

After graduating at a culinary art school in South Africa, she has been a key contributor to respected kitchens all over Africa. Trained by prominent chefs, she has designed delectable brands of influence.

Instagram @chefli_
Twitter @chefmazibuko
Facebook Page: ChefLi

 

1. What drives you?

The only thing that drives me is my passion. It’s the idea that food brings so much joy to the soul as well as nations together.

2. What is your true passion in life?

My true passion in life is love expressed through food and music. Every time I am in the kitchen I feel like I am creating a symphony of flavors. I like to listen to classical music while cooking. I also sing at my local church called Hillsong Johannesburg.

3. How did you find your passion? How old were you?

I found my passion for music when I was about 3 or 4 years old. My grandfather was a legendary musician in Madagascar and I used to follow him everywhere, as my mother recalls.

My passion for food started when I was about 9 years old, I used to sit in the kitchen watching my mother cook our meals. It was fascinating to me.

Eventually, she let me cook with her when I got a little bit older, surprisingly I went to WITS University after school but ended up dropping out because I couldn’t stop thinking about being a Chef. LOL! My mother was freaked out about it but my dad was very supportive.

Eventually, she began to see how I was flourishing & finally understood that this is what I was made for.

4. What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me the most is that it brings people together from all walks of life. There are no stereotypes or silly debates about it. It’s just something that makes everyone happy and brings healing to the soul.

5. What drove you to make money from your passions?

Well, it is my bread and butter, I don’t see myself slaving away behind an office desk all day so I need to cook to live. But I do this mostly out of love. Don’t let me cook for you when I am sad or depressed, it’s going to be horrible. I cook with my soul.

6. When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I was first paid when a family friend asked me to bake a cake for them.

7. What kept you going when you thought of giving up?

My one friend, Tiffany, keeps me going through her words of encouragement. She knows me so well and always knows how to get me out of the ruts I tend to put myself into (LOL). I tend to doubt myself sometimes. The last time I was about to give up, she got me back on track and then TOP CHEF SA contacted me.

8. What motivates you every day to become more successful?

What motivates me is the fact that I am the first real chef in my family. Also, because I am a mixed breed child, I have two families to make proud.

9. What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?

I don’t really have much to tell them, I like to work and produce in silence. They will just see the fruits.

10. What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

I would like to tell them to embrace and enjoy their journeys. Not everyone is going to make it in the same way, at the same time. You’re never too old or too young to start something, use what you have, the rest will follow.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

Cape town filmmaker, Kurt Orderson explored artistic expression in his early lifetime beginnings. After mastering crafts of his creations from his backyard in the Cape 'ghettos'(beyond Table Mountain),he ventured out into the world, rising up to becoming one of Africa's leading filmmakers.

Kurt initiated his career during his studies as a trainee at the SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), earning mere stipends for daily living expenses.

He defined his unique aesthetic voice and was soon acknowledged as a director and cinematographer on several key productions.

He founded his independent production company, “Azania Rizing”.

“Azania Rizing” is a tool for the African diaspora to rise up and map African legacies around the world on a global storytelling platform.

His major works include:

  •  Definition of Freedom, examining the role of  Hip Hop in South Africa. It was screened at the Toronto and Vancouver  hip-hop festival  winning the best documentary award at the Atlanta Hip hop film festival
  •  Tribute to Lucky Dube, the tribute to legendary reggae artist Lucky Dube was filmed in South Africa, London, and Jamaica. It was awarded the Best Documentary  Award at the  Silicon Valley African Film Festival in  2013.
  • The Pan-African Express, a journey of six young men, students from Atlanta who travel to  South Africa and trying to understand people living with  HIV and Aids. The film was funded by The Oprah Winfrey Foundation.
  • Eldorado, a feature chronicles the journey of four friends in a Gauteng township in South Africa. It won the Special mention South Africa Feature film at the  Durban International Film Festival in 2011
  •  Breathe Again,  features Derrick Orderson, a marginalized swimmer from the  Cape Flats who rose above his livelihood in an abnormal society of inhumane prejudice. It was screened at the Encounters film festival and Durban International Film Festival and several film festivals worldwide.
  • The Prodigal Son 
  • Visibly Invisible

“The Unseen Ones”

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds” Bob Marley

Current Projects

Not in My Neighborhood explores spatial violence, current gentrification and the post-apartheid era. It compares Cape Town , Johannesburg and New York uncovering the threads that exist between people that are miles apart.

 

Picture for the documentary Not in my Neighborhood. September 2016 – São Paulo – Brazil

#CreateoreneurAfrica – The Soul Journey of Kurt Orderson

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is ultimately the great history and achievements of Africa, and I guess also within a broad order global perspective is my people that inspire me and drive me. I am from South Africa, a very specific region in South Africa, Cape Town.

More specifically I am from a township from that is part of a strip of what would be known as the “ghettos”,  the Cape Flats, there is a rich history of storytelling, a great significance of the epicenter of what the foundation of the space, basically built on the legacy of apartheid. The legacy of architectural and apartheid spatial planning ideally separated people  (which was an actual policy with the group areas act ) that had a great significance of breaking up families, literally…… families scattered.

I think what maintains a traditional oral form of storytelling, obviously remained significant, it inspired my body of work ultimately that’s my drive, Africa’s history, Africa’s achievements. One is inspired by  Africa’s legacy, the epicenter of academia and  Timbuktoo…storytelling and the arts and crafts of storytelling ultimately started there and spread across the globe.

My true passion….well I am very passionate about just listening, sitting and listening to people telling stories, whether happy or sad,  ultimately passion for me personally, is driven by a deep desire of wanting to change the landscape of..change  how people perceive each other. I think it’s those stories of those people who done it in the past and are still doing it, that’s what drives my passion. I am inspired by their passion, I think I apply it to my life.That for me is what passion is. Passion goes deeper, the engine or driving force for one to do something. I think ultimately wanting to do something is ultimately passion…the driving force…

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

How did I find my passion….well that’s an interesting question? I think for me when I finished high school, I was definitely inspired by the visual medium and visual arts. There was obviously the influence of television and Hollywood tv,  I guess, but also my parents influenced me.

My father was a screen printer, which is ultimately a visual artist, although he didn’t call himself that, based on conditioning of the system that shaped him, apartheid South Africa. The idea that you were limited to do certain things when it comes to art black folks were deprived in a large historical moment of what the status quo says what you do and what you can become. My father is a strong reference to creating images and applying it to a t-shirt, applies similarly script to screen.

I think its an interesting analogy, metaphor for making films, taking a rich traditional medium and applying it to my work. I think that is how I found my passion.

How old was I?   I think my first reference to start noticing…I don’t know if I can say noticing, more where I picked up the idea that I was passionate about the visual medium, I think I was maybe thirteen years old or fourteen…..

I was locked out of my parent’s house, of course. That time there were no cellphones. I’m from a family of a family of five kids, my parents both worked, I was locked out one day.  I went to the backyard, my father had a workshop in the back of the yard, and I found a hammer and flat nose screwdriver.

I used the hammer and flat nose to carve out my name on a piece of wood and was quite impressed by myself. Wow, no one before that necessarily initiated anything like that. I wasn’t exposed to artistic expression and multiple forms of what artists do, I carved out my name, varnished it and made it immaculate. Later on meeting people who carved for a profession, creating amazing things. I always reference my first carving, that was my flame of inspiration for being an artist, use a visual medium for storytelling.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What about my passionate appeals to me the most… I guess the privilege to being a filmmaker, that being my passion but also to add to that, I feel very blessed to basically get paid for my passion, for my hobby… I would say …because we love film so much I  will do it for free, that’s how deep our passion for cinema lies…and getting paid to do something you love, your passion is a heavy blessing.

What appeals to me most is the idea of  shared history and shared knowledge, when someone allows you into their household to tell you their stories…. you being inspired and, relating on a level of  “oh I knew someone who had a similar idea about this or that .”

 I think that is what the driving force is …..sharing communal space, sharing narratives, sharing stories,  sharing politics, sharing knowledge….that for me a strong appeal to my passion…

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money out of my passion…well you know in real talk, not to romanticize the question too much. We, unfortunately, live in a very capitalist society, we inherited capitalism,, were born into a capitalistic society…..that on one level, right,, that reality of things, we need to eat right, we need to sustain ourselves… in terms of monetary exchange we apple or tomato,whatever……what well I just realised that my craft, my talent, my blessing, I can get paid for it.

For me, there was a strong driving force around craft, like crafting what is my voice, what is my aesthetic, what does Kurt bring across in a common sharing space as a filmmaker as a storyteller. It was first defining my voice, after defining that idea, that is when I felt to make money.

People  want to hire you, because they want that aesthetic that you ideally represent, that was my passion for making art and getting paid for my art, as an independent filmmaker, as an African filmmaker, things are rough out there…and we want to tell our own stories on our own terms, the system itself makes it very difficult for us to sustain ourselves. I need to work like a plumber who works with tools and I need to buy those tools. That is the reality of things

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

The first time I got paid for something… I can’t recall exactly when that was when that moment was…there was a few moment I think. I think  I worked on a television show and I was a contestant, but I also worked on a show. It was a show on SABC2, I was like 18 or 19.

We were trainees and there was a little  stipend that they paid us for traveling money or whatever. It was for generic work on set like organizing cables and assisting the floor, production. I remember very little , but that’s when I realised you can get paid for this. I was still studying at that time as well.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going. I have come through multiple crossroads moments asking myself is this really sustainable, what I do, filmmaking? Filmmaking is really hard, difficult, expensive artistic form to choose. A painter can get some canvas and some paints  make a  killer piece, get to an art market  for a million and boom there we go

For filmmakers, the reality of getting a camera, getting all the equipment you need, and then on top of it, getting a team to operate the tools, that’s a whole process on its own. These things are hard when you off the grid and not part of the mainstream in the system and don’t necessarily want to be part of it.

That’s a very conscious choice, you can just join tv and become a commissioning editor, produce for television and things will be different, it will be a completely different narrative, everything is there,, there is funding for you and they hire you.

Food, clothes and shelter have no politics.

Mutabaruka

As an independent filmmaker or producer, it is very difficult… I only recently mastered the art form of really raising money for my films, for many years my films were independent, self-funded at times.

Now its like I understand more about the industry, how to write the right proposals, and apply to the right people and getting the money and managing the money.

When you at the lowest moment at the crux, paying rent, paying teams, paying crews, and rejections. Rejection is a big thing for filmmakers , filmmakers are sensitive beings, we are fragile as well  in this…. broken world

These are all the challenges that come on your journey, it applies to life as well… life ain’t easy.  The world is not nice, the world is cruel, the life we find peace and sanity within ourselves, the people close to you. There are your therapists, they are your motivational speakers, they push you and say we believe in you, that’s what keeps me going.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 

What motivates me to be successful, what motivation every day. Whats the motivation?  I think this idea that, on one level is that  African history, African stories were for the longest time ever was told through the voice of the colonizer and the aesthetic and the lens of the colonizer…..

These were told in a biased fashion…for me now, as a fellow African filmmaker, it is our duty. I feel strongly for film to be part of the restoration process, the healing journey that we are experiencing and going through as black people across the globe and the trauma that we collectively experience.

How do we heal? What are the healing mechanisms? Now to be honest with you, we don’t have a clear answer to that question. I feel collective communal sharing through a  very powerful visual medium like television or film, then you can project to the rest of the world and share that and say in order for us to be this idea of one world and one shared history.

Everyone has to have the opportunity to share their stories through there own  POV or point of view,  I think that’s powerful ways of sharing. We all have common stories. We share a common history of people all over the world which ultimately makes us human.

Every generation blames the generation before them.

 

Racial ideas and ideology, culture and religion etcetera, are just all divisive mechanisms put in place for a form divide, rule and conquer….not to be cliched,  we have the same blood and all of that. I have transformed, transgressed that phase. I have passed that idea

Anger is fine. Anger is important. We have to be angry. We can’t all just hear  I am sorry and forgive right now,

What if I don’t want to forgive you right, now, and maybe  I want to make a film about that as part of the idea of forgiveness, as collective forgiveness.

That makes film become an interesting mechanism and medium, for multiple purposes. I feel,  personally, we can use film a methodology of social healing for healing the self and healing communities.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

What I have to say about all the people who doubted me…interesting question.  I always think about, one person comes to mind, a schoolteacher.

I wasn’t necessarily the greatest student, to be honest in high school.  I  probably could have done more. I was like, reckless and mischievous. I would say, I gave a lot of trouble.

Was I a rebel? Not sure, I don’t want to throw those words around. One teacher just didn’t like me. I was thinking about her the other day,

I think you always doubted me, I don’t think you ever believed in me, and now that my work is out there in the mainstream? I wonder if she saw my name out there. I wonder what she would think, after seeing what I had done.

I don’t want to reference people that doubted me.  I am not going to make a film for people. I make films am driven to or inspired to make. I don’t care about whether people agree with my standpoint, I love those who love me on the real level, beyond blood, blood relatives. My family is universal.  I am very blessed. We share this brokenness.As a broken people, we come together and we form this path of healing, the heal of our wounds….

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

What advice do I give to those aspiring creatives that look up to me?

The advice ideally would be to always use motivation. The idea of keeping it moving or just do it.  Life is about the idea of inspiring the other, inspiring other people. I think for me,  that is what life is about. Me inspiring other people and continuing the human change of inspiration.

One has to know your craft, know your blessing, identify your blessing.  But also knowing that this is a  very complicated world that we living in. There will be multiple stumbling blocks with a lot of us.  You carrying the torch, you carrying the great torch of your ancestors. You dont have a choice  , you have to keep that torch alight. That is the flame, the driving force, the fuel.

More important is to have a voice. Have a political voice. I don’t mean party politics.  Having a geopolitical view of the world and its complexities. An understanding of global politics. Deciphering the bullshit of what the news tells you, projecting that in your work. Be that change you ultimately want to see.

What you see is what you see. What you know is different

Mutabaruka

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Slavery is not African history. Slavery interrupted African history.

Mutabaruka

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Island of Madagascar- Lalah Raindimby

Launching Soon: #CreatepreneurAfrica

Do you fit the bill? Fill in the form and touch base! Feature in the publication of the millennium, #CreatepreneurAfrica!

My mission to continue an everlasting journey for the publication of the millennium manuscript seemed to be turning into a never-ending mission with a series of  #CreatepreneurAfrica sequels in continuous motion……..

I came into contact with Lalah Raindimby ,  a native of Madagascar, she hails from the southeastern portion of the Island country in an area called Fianarantsoa.

She is from the ethnic Betsileo group in that country.

Betsileo are widely known for their special artistic creativity with own traditional dialect called Horija Betsileo.

 

Lalah is the second generation musician and vocalist being the daughter of region’s Famous legendary artist Known as Raindimby.

 

 

Raindimby is credited with making this unique form of music widely known throughout the country and beyond the borders of Madagascar.

 

LALAH,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My true passion is my music. For me, music is a means of expression of life as a human being. Performing the folk and cultural music of my homeland allows me to keep my heritage close to me and to build upon the legacy of my dad and other noted performers of his generation. The music gives me motivation and strength in life.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
At a very young age, I think I was six years old when I observed my dad and other family members rehearsing for a performance in the house.  

I began to sing. By the time I was a teenager my dad invited me on stage to perform with him.  I joined him on many occasions and found that performing was enjoyable and the audience response was encouraging.

From that time until the present music has been a critical part of my life. My first love and my passion.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
I find that when I am engaged with the music I become spiritually transformed and purely focused on my music and forget about the troubles of the world.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
As a teenager performing with my father and realizing that my father was singing as professional and making money from his performance that he shared with me and I realize in addition being spiritually gratifying I could make money as a professional singer.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
As a teenager performing with my dad.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The memory of my late father and reflecting on the sacrifice that he made to expose the musical tradition Horija Betsileo of our people to the entire country and beyond.
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I have in effect become an Ambassador to keep that musical and cultural tradition alive and pass it on to the next generation.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I must continue to strive in those ideas which are dear to me and I cannot allow them to stop me from perusing my goals and dreams.
 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Well, you are going to face lots of challenges but don’t give up on your dreams and your passion, just believe in yourself and work hard to achieve the goals you have set for yourself.

Music by Lalah Raindimby

Lalah Raindimy Soul Sounds

Get ready for Right Brain Marketing- CreateprenuerAfrica# ,starting up in the southern region of Africa!

 

“#CreatePreneurAfrica” Launching Soon: Publication of the Millenium!

COMING SOON. GET READY FOr #CREATEPRENEUR AFRICA. Drop in your details in the form below, if you feel you fit in  #CreatepreneurAfrica and feature in the launch of the millennium

Meet  our top  #CreatePeneurAfrica features thus far:

ALL THE WAY FROM MADAGASCAR: Meet Lalah Raindimby, extraordinaire root Madagascar songstress and musician with several social causes for nurturing the future of Madagascar

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Island of Madagascar- Lalah Raindimby

ALL THE WAY FROM TANZANIA:  Meet Pablo Zungu Createpreneur Extraordinaire

‘#CreatepreneurAfrica’ – Pablo Zungu Art wonders in Tanzania

ALL THE WAY FROM SOUTH AFRICA: Meet Tu Nokwe– LIving Music Legend and more!

“#CreatePreneurAfrica” – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

 

ALL THE WAY FROM EAST AFRICA: Meet Shabani Mpita,  specialized field and tour guide  as well as a creative artist

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/turning-creative-passions-into-profit/

From Lagos Nigeria, Dance Sensation Taiwo Soyebo the founder of Tourism expression, poetry, and arts festival, T.E.P.A.F

#CreatepreneurAfrica @Taiwo Soyebo – Dancing away in Nigeria

 

 

From Morogoro Tanzania- Meet the world of animation and the JUU Afrikan Festival Clenga Ngatigwa

CreatePreneurAfrica@Cleng’a Ng’atigwa- Animation and traditional music in Tanzania

From Bagamoyo in Tanzania – Meet drummer from the acrobat and drummer group, Mafisi, meet Thomas Mura.

“#CreatepreneurAfrica @Thomas Mura: Soul Rhythm from Bagamoyo

 

From Tanzania, meet master sculptor and artist  Saidi Mbungu, and his passion to share his skill and uplift coming generations with his Africa Modern Art project.

“#CreatepreneurAfrica @Thomas Mura: Soul Rhythm from Bagamoyo

Filmmaker taking the World by Storm- Meet Kurt Orderson– Azania Rizing!

CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

 

From South Africa meet the award-winning actress, storyteller and community leader Andrea Dondolo.

#CreatePreneurAfrica-Andrea Dondolo,Queen Spirit Shining Light in South Africa

Tantalizing Tastebud Treat sensation- Chef Li!

CreatePreneurAfrica -Tastebud treats from Chef Li

 

Hakeem Kae-Kazim , Africa’s leading actor taking the world cinema stage by storm!

#CreatePreneurAfrica- Africa icon Hakeem Kae Kazim- takes the world cinema stage by storm!

 

He is about to spread light all over Africa. Meet our leading scientist Emmanuel Obayagbona

#CreatePreneurAfrica-Meet Africa’s Fastest Rising Scientist : Emmanuel Obayagbona

Our Pan African media proprietor Rosie Motene takes center stage in raising Africa’s stream of talent.

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Pan Africa media proprieter – Our Voice of Africa : Rosie Motene

Africa’s poetic vision meet Kariuki wa Nyamu, sharing his journey into the light of words.

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Africa Poetic vision : Kenya’s Kariuki wa Nyamu

 

Proudly Tanzanian actor Kihaka Gnd is ready to shine, universally!

#CreateprenuerAfrica – Proudly Tanzanian Actor – Kihaka GND

Mak Manaka ,South Africa poet-  spreading the word with  soul purpose

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Poetically speaking : Mak Manaka

Jihan El Tahri, Egyptian filmmaker  raises consciousness with awakening documentaries across the continent

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Visionary Soul Filmmaker Jihan El Tahri

 

Afrodazzled’ Kenyan Artist Cyrus Kabiru in his spectacular vision of spectacles

#CreatepreneurAfrica- ‘Afrodazzled’ Kenyan Artist Cyrus Kabiru- “C-Stunner Spectacular Spectacles”

Nigerian Fashionista UKachukwu Okechukwu journeys us through his design of the century vision

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Nigerian Fashionista Supreme – Ukachukwu Okechukwu

 

Meet Donald Molosi – he has some critical love letter for humanity!

 

 

CreatePreneurAfrica – Botswana’s Donald Molosi’s “Critical love letters to Humanity”

Mountaineer Monde Sitole is taking Africa to new heights. Are we ready to join him and reach new peaks?

 

Meet trailblazer filmmaker Vincent Moloi. The voice of the nation

#CreatepreneurAfrica Vincent Moloi : Trailblazer filmmaker capturing human existence dynamics!

“#CreatePreneurAfrica” – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

My venture continued. The final touches took an extraordinary connection – The Journey of my soul. My conversations with Tu Nokwe sparkled the final touches of #CreatepreneurAfrica.

An excerpt from the “Publication of the Millenium”, #Createpreneur Africa: Tu Nokwe- ‘The Light of Africa’

Meet our CreatePreneur™,Tu Nokwe,a legendary musician all the way from South Africa. 

Born and raised during the mainstream helms of the detrimental apartheid era into an artistic family that chose to soar above the pressing system and created Amajika.

This was a youth and child development arts organization to boost self-esteem and counteract the collating mental abuse that shattered mass populations emotionally.
We explore her breathtaking lifestyle, delving into the roots of soul inspiration as we explore her pathways, sharing her journey of self-discovery on a road of survival.

Tu Nokwe,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
My passion.My passion.Where do I start? We could end up with episodes of my true passions as they flow into so many channels. Well as you know, my outlet of expression is the creation of sounds and soothing soul rhythms, pulsating heartbeats in blissful melodies.

“I am creative, I am physical, and I am mental. I am emotional, but most of all I am a spiritual being having a human experience. That is just the beginning of the “Journey of My Soul”

How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I think I was born into it and grew up thriving in the presence all around me. My inner drive & determination fuelled me to learn to play the guitar without a guitar in my hands, but two chairs strung with wool from one chair to the other;using an old guitar tutor to position the fingers in cord formations and coordination. 

My career started when I was eighteen months old! In a commercial for a soap brand. I come from a family of musicians rooted in historical ingenuity of memorable creations.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
It is an outlet of soul expression. I explore the mantra

‘Order creates comfort’. Creative self-management is the core of my spirit as I share and display self-management tools leaving those around me invigorated with a soul-filled purpose.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
The gift of abundance is an asset, allowing open doors to explore. Positive affirmations to call on wealth is a stepping-stone to encounter all barriers in the most lucid times and delve into ‘The Light of Africa’, beaming promise of abundance. 

Africa is rooted in wealth despite the world image of poverty-stricken and downtrodden bereavement that is propagated and installed in the mass media. We are born on the soil rooted in wealth and treasures beyond human imagination. It is ours.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Every engagement was abundant on spiritual rewards. My first performance that brought in a cash flow was at the age of 18 at a wedding with the ‘Black Angels’, a local band. And then when I turned 13  at the annual jazz festival 'Milk Africa'(with the “Black Angels” - the Sneddon Theatre at the University of Natal in Kwa-Zulu Natal & the epic movie 'Shaka Zulu'. When I was 18, I earned a living doing African braids at a hair salon.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I launched the first African Diary - Journey of my Soul” over eight years. Initially it was my supportive tool for self-management. 

The project sparked off out of a concerned calling out from the lack of purpose and low self-esteem that brewed on a daily basis. My resilience to counteract all obstacles, keep focus and having my effective presence engraved in all souls I touched with my talent. I never gave up; I knew there were many doors open amongst the few that closed before me.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My mantra I never cease to chant is ‘Order creates comfort. I am a spiritual being and give thanks each day for all my blessings. The campus for my state of being is joy & happiness. Not everything may come to you at the time you desire it to. However, in Gods time, what is meant to be will be.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
All I can say to those who doubted me is advise them to rise above their fears and soar at rising heights. We all need somebody to lean on.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
“Journey of my Soul” was initially used by uprising performing artists in Amajika Youth and children arts under the auspices of the Nokwe Creative development foundation founded by my family. 

During 1976 when there was a need to boost, self esteem in the helm of the grueling apartheid System in my country. It became clear that as an artist my purpose was to devote time and energy to empower the children of Africa. 

I discovered that self-work had to begin with me. Once I had a holistic understanding of myself, I could reach out to others. My advice to aspiring creative’s is journey to define you and rediscover your LIFE purpose. If you follow my life story, my hope is that you will explore exercises and concepts to develop who you are. I wish you all the best with the ‘Journey of your Soul’

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

“#CreatepreneurAfrica”:Touching Base with Shabani Mpita-Tanzania

The Soul Journey of Createpreneurs in Africa

My collective realm was a calling of "first class living".The journey was gradual,and then I touched base with creative talent and skill from the Motherland of Africa.

The crux of “CreatepreneurAfrica” was all about ” pursuing creative passions  and overcoming consistent challenges “

My soul calling as I initially launched into a world campaign was to spread empowerment for creatives to flourish.

 

In-depth root research for my voice to echo was a calling that routed me the treasures of Africa.

 The journey was a realm of inner soul space as I touched base with an overflowing database of creativity rooted in Africa. It was time! Rise Africa….

Why Africa?

Economics and Africa did not quite blend well. All I knew about Africa was famine and poverty. I realized with time Africa was the root of all. The beginning of creation. The root of creative soul. I met artists, musicians, entertainers and soul createpeneurs.

My inner soul space blossomed as I touched base with an overflowing database of creativity rooted in Africa. It was time!

I initially came into contact with exploring motherland Africa with Shabani Mpita on a venture of discovery.

An excerpt from a series of personal interviews with creatives rooted in Africa: "Right Brain Marketing"
I initially came into contact with Shabani Mpita on a venture of discovery. Meet Shabani Mpita, an artist, with a tourism profession and small business to sell his artwork.
 How is it possible to balance your profession, your creative passion, and business?
A structured schedule to keep me focused on my time and energy. Each activity can be very demanding I make sure I give all tasks enough focus so none becomes a liability.

Sometimes I bring all together in a combination of inspiration.
How difficult is it to convert from creative frame of mind into a business form?
It is stressful and difficult at most times. I strive to keep myself motivated and remain operating. My creative passions keep me persistent but to persistence as a tool of growth needs a business mindset to be in order.
How is it possible to maintain the artistic value and run a business?
I am a professional artist; I aim to get paid for my professional talents. All businesses expect payment for products and services or product.Of course, the aim is to inspire others with my artwork but I need to care for myself. I am not in the mindset of a “starving artist”. I value my work and talent so I take opportunities that pay for the work I produce
I want to send a message of inspiration to follow dreams and pursue them. Anything that one aspires is achievable if hard work is consistent real value is assigned to service and product.
 

Shabani Ibrahim Mpita, a skilled local artist, with a tourism profession and small artwork business.

Born in the notorious spice Island of Zanzibar, Shabani Mpita kept his passion for the continent of Africa. A keen traveler, he became a backpacker, exploring Africa. Eventually, he ventured in a nomadic motion back to his homeland, Tanzania.

Living all around his country from Zanzibar, he spread out from Iringa to Mafia Island, Mloka village near Selous and Kigamboni, a short ferry ride from the bustling Dar es Salaam, he brings forth an insider view into the everyday marvels and sightings. With his guidance, each second spent in Tanzania becomes a worthy experience for all who realize their dream to explore the marvels of Tanzania.

‘I aim to be a key tool in the exploration and discovery of my homeland. Life is about exploring, new discoveries, and realizations. I journey on the motions of a Tour and field guide into a pathway designed by destiny’

Exploring Tanzania https://www.amazon.com/Shabani-Ibrahim-Mpita/e/B06XJY25J9

‘#CreatepreneurAfrica’ – Pablo Zungu Art wonders in Tanzania

The journey was ongoing. The chapter seemed to be spurting out more and more. My never-ending delve into Africa. The spark was ignited into abundance beyond note. Turning passions into profit, the rhythm echoed into smooth sailing miracles.

The Making of a Createpreneur.

When anybody churns out the term “entrepreneur”, what springs to mind at the word?A briefcase, tie and suit image?

A briefcase, tie and suit image?

On the other hand, maybe pictures of those in the billionaire ranks flashed in the media.

That is a narrow view. There are vast ways to spring any creative business venture into motion.

A common theme of ‘CreatEntepreneurs’ is a risk. Many work independently, industries differ, business can gain wisdom from other varied experiences and their management of work and risks.

 

If you an artist that goes solo with your artwork meet, CreatEntepreneur™ Pablo Zungu.

 

 

 

Pablo is an artist in Tanzania in East Africa with a large international following.

 

As artist living in a remote unknown village called Mloka on the outskirts of the main buzz of city centre. How did he get an international audience, people from all over the world to buy his local trending artwork?

Tell us about your true passion in life?

My passion is filling my day creating new pieces of art. It is expression, letting go. Each day on waking until the day closes. I found my passion at a young age. Left with the responsibility to take care of my two younger brothers at an early age when my parents passed away. My art was my key to keep all together in challenging times

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

The independence and freedom it provides. I am not imprisoned in a warehouse packing shelves or joining other pathways I have little interest in, to barely fill a fridge and every hour consumed. Slavery did not die. It evolved, not through chains at feet, but into a concrete jungle. It became legalized .My art is my freedom to create an income on my terms in my environment.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

I do not know if it was about choice. It was there, in my pathway. I discovered that selling paintings was a stream of income. With no conflict of being under instruction of any authority figures and taking orders and instructions. I chose a stress free way to sustain my family and myself.

 

When was the first time you got paid for your passion?

I was a teenager and spent my time creating artwork. One-day tourists passed by, totally immersed in the piece, and placed US dollars in my hand. I was thrilled. Dollars converted into a huge amount in my local currency. I even afforded to buy more paints and canvases.

 

What kept you going when you thought about giving up? 

There were many times that I doubted any ability to make more money with my art. I overcame the self-doubt by creating and sharing my work.

What motivates you each and every day to be even more successful?

Even if I tried to join the nine to five worlds, I know I would not make it. I strived on to keep creating and spreading my work to all regions where there were possible sales. Every region that had markets or stalls for artwork I found a stall owner to display my work and draw in interest and sales.

I am based in a remote village on the outskirts of the city centre, but I prefer to be there. I live close to a popular game reserve that has a multitude of travelers from all over the world. My art is indigenous local Tanzanian authentic that appeals to all those who travel to our country. It gives them memorable artefacts to take back home of a land they will never forget and strive to revisit. My art is one aspect that promotes the thriving economic sector of tourism, so to speak.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I can only share my well wishes that they gain success in their pathways as I have found my passion and I am keeping to it.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

I advise them to follow their dreams and never give up. Look at all possibilities and find the one that works for you.


Find or Be Found……….

 

Welcome ExploreMotherlandAfrica

CreatePreneurAfrica@Cleng’a Ng’atigwa- Animation and traditional music in Tanzania

 

 

“Our seeds of creativity sprout out into roots that branch out into a world of knowledge, wisdom, and inspiration”. Cleng’a Ng’atigwa

Cleng’a Ng’atigwa, co-founder of leading animation kids series Ubongo kids and founder of JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAl,  is taking on the world by storm.

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
What drives me is to see positive changes and upliftment of lives around me. I believe my purpose in life is to instill a readiness for our new generation.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
My mum seeded my passion. I observed her praying for women and children in my childhood. Our task was to fetch water for elder women and assist them.
My mum was a positive inspiration to all around her.  When I was about eight years old, she sang to us and tell us folk tales. Every story had a linked song.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
My passion is my ultimate happiness. I get to meet new interesting people. I am naturally a creator of concepts. I create concepts that help others to learn and grow.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money is the greatest challenge I face. It took a long time for my creativity to eventually become an income stream. My focus has always been primarily on creativity.

It took a long to raise income through my passion because my thoughts were based on creativity rather than making money through it, that is a big challenge that I face.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Payments come in various forms. Some are indirect. Some are rewards of appreciation with low incentives. The first time I was paid a regular income was when I initiated a concept that became a huge success, Ubongo kids.
Mama Ndege
As co-founder of the animation project, Ubongokids, an educative cartoon series, I stepped into various roles. I was the art director, the main character, "Mama Ndege", was my conceptualization,and I played the character voiceover. 

I composed the main theme song "hisabati" and so many other songs for the seriess.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The quality of my services. Seeing the satisfaction my work creates for others around me. My biggest challenge is raising capital.

What keeps me going is motivating others and getting the support and motivation I need to go on. Stand by me and I stand by you.

Special guests like the legendary Tu Nokwe, all the way from South Africa endorsed the initiative and was our guest of honor at the JUU Afrikan festival in 2017.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I know success. I have seen the success of mere ideas becoming lifelong projects that triumph and uplift many. Knowing that makes me keep on going and striving to reach my goals.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I just wish them all the best and pray that they reach their goals and keep inspired. Those that condemn you do so just to uplift themselves when obstacles come in the way of their dreams
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
The journey of being a creative is no easy path ahead. Strive to do what incites your passion and you will reach you the pathway laid before you.

Welcome #exploremotherlandAfrica

 

 

CreatepreneurAfrica – Saidi Mbungu @ Bagamoyo, Tanzania

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My true passion is art. I believe art is empowering. It is a golden key, an outlet of expression. A tool of upliftment.

There is no free schooling in Tanzania, there is a need for an outlet for education. The youth in Bagamoyo are orphaned or poor. I started AMAP school in my backyard.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The thought of being a creator is amazing. You are on a throne of power after a piece of work is complete. I cannot even explain that element of total upliftment.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
There is so much bereavement, so much poverty surrounding our everyday life. Tourists are free to explore and enjoy our natural wonders, but we are so caught up in our economic disempowerment. But we have the tools and the talent of natural artistic skill. This is how we can rise as a nation!
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
I remember the day. I was young. I cannot remember how old I was. I just remember the time was not good. There was little hope, scarcity at my home that triggered so many tensions. I sat outside creating an art piece of recycled materials. 

A passerby noticed. I was still in the process of polishing. They waited in wonder and handed a batch of notes and takeaway snacks and a juice too! I was delighted!
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
Adversities are always there. They come and go. I recluse and engage in a new piece of work and I am lifted and inspired.
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
The kids around me. Our coming generation. They uplift my soul to reach to the stars.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
The angels of hope are always around me. I truly hope you find yours
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
I want to tell all that aspire to keep holding on. I believe in sharing hope. We can rise up together.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

“#CreatepreneurAfrica @Thomas Mura: Soul Rhythm from Bagamoyo

THE ACROBAT AND DRUM TEAM- MAFISI GROUP- BAGAMOYO

It was a soul calling to the remote town in Tanzania- Bagamoyo ( “I lay down my heart”) when Thomas Mura was born.

His life purpose flowed into the rhythmic airwaves as he began tuning in drum beats into the neighborhood in Bagamoyo.

An avid soccer player, he spent his days teaming up on soccer fields honing him into a team player for his community.

Sharing his soccer skills and easing off at the Bagamoyo beach, Thomas soon became a yoga practitioner, sharing his gained wisdom into healing pathways for the future of Bagamoyo.

Many volunteers in Bagamoyo flocked to hear sounds emanate blending in with the soul beat of Bagamoyo.

The artistic soul of Bagamoyo is captured in TASUBA, an arts college with an annual Bagamoyo festival drawing world crowds and special guests.

The Bagamoyo festival featured a special guest all the way from South Africa,  the legendary soul sister, Tu Nokwe, sharing her musical talent, life skills and knowledge into the heart of Bagamoyo. The shine of her light sparked off in Bagamoyo eventually spread out to Morogoro at the Juu Afrikan Festival.

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My passion. Where do I begin?  Well, the beginning of drumming away rhythmic healing beats. I spend time on soccer fields and at Bagamoyo beach sharing my purpose in this life creating yoga retreats and spreading soul healing!
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
My early days in the pathways of growing up in Bagamoyo shaped all of my existence.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?
Being heard! Many of our lives are filled with sea waves of tides streaming in and out. It sometimes topples our smooth flow. Drumming for me, was for me,, but the rhythm spread out. 

I am now part of an acrobat and drumming band, the Mafisi group in Bagamoyo. We plan to stream our vibe into every gravel in our land Tanzania. We plan to reach out to the continent of Africa, our motherland.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Survival. Beach days and drumming away made up the essence of me. Time to ease out at yoga sessions and the soccer field filled my soul. That is when I decided to share all I have gained,I need income as well. 
Not through wasting away days laboring for the fruits of masters.Those days have passed by in the Bagamoyo slave route days. Not in my lifetime.....
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
At practice sessions on Bagamoyo Beach. I was handed out my first dollars by tourists passing by  captured in delight by the drumming session
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
Watching the waves on the beach front. Knowing that there are high and low tides for all of us, I kept on going in soul meditation in the breeze of the sea.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I know what I can share with my world. I know I can uplift my community and share with generations to come

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I will wave them away and wish them all the best. Tide in,Tide out!
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Keep following your passions. Stay at it, even the toughest of times do pass by and you will be uplifted in spirit and soul.

 

Welcome.  #ExploremotherlandAfrica

#CreatePreneurAfrica-Andrea Dondolo,Queen Spirit Shining Light in South Africa

‘Rise above circumstances and become a beacon of hope…….

Nomasebe Andrea Dondolo

How did it all begin? The journey on the beacon of hope pathway?
It was a calling.........a calling for South Africa. The need for patriots to nurture, uphold and defend the honor of our country, of our continent, through our actions and our beliefs.

Welcome to the world of Andrea Dondolo!

 

 Spirit of a Queen – The rise of Andrea Dondolo

Award-winning actress from Eastern Cape, Andre Dondolo is a writer, a cultural activist,  a community leader, a storyteller, a Ímbongi (Xhosa praise singer), a talented bead crafter and a businesswoman.

She runs “Calabash Storyteller” a township talent agency and her own clothing line. Her other activities are storytelling workshops for children and adults.

Calabash Storytellers is an NPO focused on creating dialogue through the arts, culture, and heritage. Township Talent is a business based on innovation design

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Her early studies in human rights at the University if the WesternCape and a drama diploma with the “New Africa Theatre Association”, led her into professional productions like “Romeo and Juliet” and “Dancing 2 patterns” at the Cape Baxter Theatre.

She has featured in international feature films, “The Final Solution” as well as “The Piano Player.” A household name, South Africa television has her featured in multiple shows.

Createpreneur Africa- Andrea Dondolo

Tell us what drives you?
The need to live a purpose driven life rather than just existing knowing that after each fall you must get up and get going bruises and all are just your own scars.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
Wow, I believe it always been there, all it took was alignment and opportunity so I guess as soon as I could reason and manage the conversation with my mind, heart and soul, I nailed it, To be exact, I guess at around 25.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The adrenaline and fear that fuels appeal to me.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money makes the world go round, if you make it while you doing what you love, you've nailed it.
When was the first time you got paid for your passion?
In the year 1999, it was a theatre show called "The Good heart" at Baxter theatre while finalizing my studies at New Africa Theatre Association.
What kept you going when you thought you were giving up?
My son and competitive spirit.
What motivates you every day to be more successful?
My son.
What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?
Well  my life is exactly that, my own, live yours and prosper, by the way, no one died and put you in charge of my life, live yours.
What advice do you give creatives who look up to you?
Just run your race and keep your focus on the ball......

 

 

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica. Soul words of wisdom, CreatepreneurAfrica

3 Island Escape Getaways in East Africa

Whether you’re looking for giant coconuts or giant tortoises,lush rainforests or cool highlands, wildlife or glowing coral reefs and crossroads cuisine, there is an island in East Africa to suit your taste and budget.

The East coast of Africa is blessed with stunning islands and warm Indian Ocean waters.

Some are sovereign nations, others are unknown secret destinies harboring fantastic natural and cultural treasures.

The palm-lined beaches and luxury resorts are only one aspect of the marvels East Africa island getaways in on the Indian Ocean can offer. There is much more than glossy travel brochures put out. The diverse island explorers and spice merchants have shaped the essence. Africa’s ocean-themed adventures have loads to offer travelers.

The ‘Melting Pot’ of  East Africa Islands

The complicated history of the culturally rich islands of East Africa comes from the strategic bases that they were for over 1000 years.

They served as trade routes between Europe, Arabian Peninsula, and the Indian subcontinent.

Omani traders and Portuguese sailors, merchants and colonials…. , all gravitated to farm sugar cane and spices, trading gold, ivory, and slaves.

This is evident in the 15th century Swahili Lamu ruins, the Shirazi heritage of Zanzibar and historical plantation homes. We see it in Creole cuisine in Mauritius.

The oldest settlement in Kenya is Lamu and shares much with Stonetown in Zanzibar.The muli stories of townhouses with balconies shading the narrow lanes filled with soul-inspired vendors selling delicacies, arts, and crafts in silver and wood.

1. Zanzibar

Tanzania has many adventurous crusades,from beaches, ruins, wildlif,the Mt Kilimanjaro summit and the island of Zanzibar

The age-old living traditions in Zanzibar are a soul rewarding experience.

 

 

Families in Zanzibar gather to snack and promenade in Forodhani Gardens during celebrations and special festive day.

Island Beach bumming and Diving Ventures

Budget-friendly diving on Zanzibar and Pemba offer rewarding dives. Accommodation is suited to budget travelers as well. Good quality in abundance is what you get in Nungwi, Kendwa,  Jambiani, and Paje. Public transport is easy to reach, along streets with delicious, plentiful food.

2. Comoros

Between Madagascar and Mozambique, the Comoros Archipelago has four islands in total. The three main ones that gained independence in 1975 are Grand Canmore, Anjouan, and Mohéli. The fourth one, Mayotte, is still under French rule.

Comoros Islands, a population descended from Malay, African and Arab immigrants.

The culture of Comoros is shaped by Portuguese explorers, Arab traders from Persia and Portugal as well as the French colonizers in the19th century.

An active East Africa volcano is located at the Grande Comore.It erupted in the year 2005 creating a desert landscape offset by turquoise seas and white beaches.

Mohéli island is a major turtle nesting site in East Africa, where you are guaranteed to view turtles.

To escape crowds an experience life at a slow pace plan a getaway to Comoros islands. There are pristine beaches, lush rainforests and beautiful reefs with a fascinating blend of Swahili and Arab culture.

3.Mauritius

The Mauritius archipelago comprises of

  • Mauritius
  • Rodrigues
  • Agaléga
  • St. Brandon.

Two other territories, Tromelin Island and the Chagos Archipelago  are claimed by Mauritius but disputes by Uk and France(1)

Mauritius, a world-class destination combines influences from Africa and Europe. It is famous for beach resorts with amazing coastal shores.

Scuba diving and deep-sea fishing are popular activities. The  forests on the island  provide habitat for the  endemic bird, plant and mammal species

With sophisticated cuisine, nightlife and fishing villages, Mauritius caters for every taste.

4.Seychelles

 

Seychelles is made up of 115 paradise islands it has a small population, is uncrowded.

The idyllic beaches, aquamarine waters offering excellent snorkeling and diving are tourist drawcards.

Rare wildlife range from pelagic seabirds to giant tortoises. The cuisine in Seychelles has a taste from Africa,  a tinge of Asian sensation topped with European settler influences.

The luxury resorts in Seychelles, make it famous for couples on honeymoon.

5. Madagascar

Madagascar located off the Mozambique coast is the fourth largest island in the world.  Boasting unique, fauna and flora, 90 % of the wildlife in Madagascar will not be found anywhere else.

 

 

The most famous are Lemurs.

The lush rainforests, giant baobabs, limestone karsts and isolated islets are a calling for visitors. Activities range from scuba diving to deep-sea fishing and hiking to whale-watching.

Welcome to the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar, an eco-tourism destination of note for all discerning explorers of world wonders. Dramatic peaks, primordial forests, stony deserts and extinct volcanoes.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

Coastal forests – Herbal Healing in Tanzania- Africa

Tanzania's  small,  geographically isolated coastal forests support a huge base of endemic plants and animals.

Herbal Power

Africa is filled with exceptional biological richness with scarce linked studies.

The abundance of benefits of plants that surround us is phenomenal. Additional uses are found continuously.

Let’s talk about the magical plants in Tanzania.

Plants are food as well as natural medicine as well as extracting oils for natural cosmetics for a full healthy system.

Coastal ecosystems in Tanzania were identified by Tanzania scientists in 1989 that needed further study due to their importance and biological richness.

The Frontier Tanzania project provided the manpower and means to catalog a listing importance of plants and trees and provide conservation management recommendations.

The three-year study included

  • Mafia Island Coral Reefs
  • Monsoon Coastal forests
  • Rufiji Delta sediments
  • Mikumi nation park vegetation

Medicinal Plants in Tanzania’s Coastal Forests

The threatened forests of coastal Tanzania have been used by traditional medical practitioners.

There is a growing awareness of the contribution of herbal medicines to facilitate health and welfare of local economies and rural communities.

East Africa’s coastal forests are considered as the most threatened types on the continent of  Africa.(1)

3 Magical Trees in Tanzania

Cariissa Spinarum

Carissa Spinarum

Known as ‘Mtandamboo’ in Kiswahili, the plant is an inspiration source for many communities.

A great food source with medicinal benefits as well, the sweet fruit is a delicacy.  The pulp of the fruit can be used to produce red wine as well.

A traditional cure for diseases every part of the tree, the roots, the leaves, barks, and fruit are used to treat a multitude of diseases.

Headaches, rheumatism. chest complaints, gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes, rabies malaria, hernia, toothache, ulcers, cough, worm infestation, and the list goes on!

In the year 2011, thousands of people flocked to Tanzania to Samunge village for treatment by a Catholic priest against infertility diabetes, hypertension, asthma and cancer and even AIDS.

 

Muaruabaini – The tree that cures 40 diseases

The Neem tree, known by the ”Muarubani tree.”Muarubaini translates to 40. The tree is said to cure 40 different diseases. People have used it for curing cancer, malaria, STDs, typhoid and a wide range of other diseases as well as a natural contraceptive.

The oil extracted from the seeds inserted into the vagina on a regular basis prevents pregnancy. This is an effective birth control method. This should not be used if pregnant as it induces abortion.

Muarubaini