South Africa’s Cultural Soul – The roots of Township Tours

South Africa – few can rival South African soul in the townships. Today we explore Kwa-Zulu Natal.  Walking the paths of some of the greatest leaders.

It’s another world and another time. This is part of the old Africa, where the amaZulu ruled unchallenged, a place of beaded headdresses and rawhide shields, beehive huts, and a lifestyle that properly belongs to the great age of Shaka.

Gain an insight into the amaZulus’ traditional way of life their beliefs, crafts, songs and dances at Shakaland, the open-air museum near Eshowe.

This is the oldest town in Zululand. Shakaland is also the oldest Zulu Cultural Village in Zululand, originally built as a scenery for the movie “Shaka Zulu”.

It’s been converted into a Zulu homestead with thatched beehive houses arranged in a circle around the central cattle kraal. Visitors stay in beehive houses, with all the modern conveniences.

 

The village overlooking the Umhlatuze Lake offers the true Zulu cultural experience and traditions, including pottery, beadwork, beer making and tasting as well as magnificent foot-stomping, ground shaking demonstrations of traditional Zulu dance.

Assegai-wielding warriors will teach you how to fight. You can also witness the age-old methods of making spears and shields, skills that are to a large extent disappearing. This is one of the few men who still know how to make the broad stabbing spear introduced by King Shaka. A memorable part of the tour is the spear throwing and stick-fighting demonstrations.

The  Memorable Adventures of Zululand

Kwa-Zulu Natal

The Kwa-Zulu Natal province is rooted in the legacy of the Zulu nation. There are ample opportunities to explore the fascinating world of the Zulu’s.

There are many private as well as provincial game reserves showcasing the abundance of biodiversity in the region.  You get an authentic safari experience and a historical viewpoint through the battlefield routes of the historical town, Vryheid which has  tea plantations and cattle ranches.

The Battlefields Route is significant as it was is where there were historical clashes between Zulu,  Brit, and Boer (farmer). The Kwa Zulu Natal battlefield region extends from Thukela river at Dolphin coast to Richards Bay further in the north to Paulpietersburg.

Paulpietersburg is 50hm to the north and links the inland of South Africa with the coast of  Zululand. This town is widely known for sulfur springs and therapeutic spas.

The major attractions are Zulu culture, birdlife, and many nature and game reserves.

Zulu culture is all over South Africa, but not as poignant as the Zulu kingdom.

Visitors can feel and taste true Zulu hospitality in dance, food, and song. There is an opportunity to become part of authentic Zulu weddings, assist with chores in the village and even visit a local sangoma (traditional healer).

You can take an ox-wagon visit to the Zulu beehive huts. Or even explore local shebeens, traditional medicine outlets. You get to learn how locals adapt age-old traditions into modern living.

 

  • A Zululand heritage experience is by stopping at Melmoth ‘where the legend King Shakas was born ‘the Valley of Kings’
  • The Emakhosini Valley is the site of graves of many Zulu Kings
  • The Zululand Birding Route has 650 recorded species of birds. The Dlinza Nature Reserve is a popular spot for birding.
  • Vast nature and game reserves from subtropical forest reserves  along the coast as well as game reserves further north

The biggest attraction in the KZN region is Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park.

It is the oldest in Africa and home to the famous big 5 in Africa. Rhinos, drive game lions, elephants, buffalos and leopards. There are self-drive game as well as guided walks.

 

Wilderness trails provide an intimate experience in the bush

End the Zululand expedition round off will be Richards Bay. The large town boasts a stunning scenery of the wetland.

 

Welcome to Motherland Africa......

 

The other side of Table Mountain – Cape Town


Planning to travel in Africa?  The magnificent Table Mountain is a drawing card and the starting point is the infamous Cape Town for most… today we look over and behind Table Mountain.

Table Mountain

The perks of traveling to Africa are endless. Instead of scanning the game parks for rhino or setting off for a day sampling Cape chardonnays, take a  look at the other side.

The townships of Cape Town….. You inhale the roots of freedom, exhaling air of human rights, justice, and reconciliation. A flow from shebeens to sangomas, the emotional sensory vibe sets you sparkling off with a vivid social culture. Nothing is amiss as every township bubbles with its own unique story about its struggles and how it evolved and revolved to its current state.

A treasure in the center of Cape Town – Bo-Kaap

Bo-Kaap

Beyond the hustles and bustles, just beyond the city of Cape Town, you find Bo-Kaap.

The “Bo Kaap” is one of the most interesting parts of Cape Town culturally and historically. Colorful houses, steep cobbled streets, the muezzin’s calls to prayer, and children traditionally dressed for Madrassa add to this unique Cape experience. It is a multicultural area, tucked into the fold of signal hill. Use the cobblestoned streets as your guide and you will be lead into a lively suburb filled with brightly colored houses from the nineteenth and seventeenth century, shrines of Muslim saints, an abundance of beautiful Mosques, and the very first mosque that existed in South Africa.

Use the cobblestoned streets as you are lead into a lively suburb filled with brightly colored houses from the nineteenth and seventeenth century, shrines of Muslim saints, an abundance of beautiful Mosques, and the very first mosque that existed in South Africa.

The residents of Bo-Kaap are mostly descended from slaves who were imported to the Cape by the Dutch during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. They came from Africa, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, and Java Malaysia. Some of them were political exiles and convicts. They were known as “Cape Malays”, which is incorrect as most of Bo-Kaap’s residents are not entirely of Malaysian descent. Their many Indonesian traces of vocabulary in the dialect of Cape, for example, “trim-

They were known as “Cape Malays”, which is incorrect as most of BoKaap’s residents are not entirely of Malaysian descent. Their many Indonesian traces of vocabulary in the dialect of Cape, for example, “trim-makaasi” thank-you, as well as  “kanalah” please! There are also many words, which have also been substituted with Afrikaans.

Funnily enough, Afrikaans evolved as a language of its own through a simplification of Dutch so that the slaves could communicate with the Dutch and each other since they all came from different countries and cultures. Muslims were the first to write texts in Afrikaans.
Cape Carnival

Each year on the 2nd of January, the Bo-Kaap celebrates a big street party, the “Coon Carnival” in the center of town. It was originally introduced by the Muslim slaves who celebrated their only day off work in the whole year. Nowadays men, woman, and children march from the Grand Parade to the Green Point stadium, singing, and dancing.

 

Kramat

Kramats or Muslim Shrines are burial sites of Saints of Islam. Cape Town residents have for a number of generations paid their respects these Shrines. There are three Karamats in Bo Kaap, and Signal Hill behind BoKaap has two.

 

 

Bo-Kaap Museum

One of the oldest buildings in Wale Street 71 houses the “Bo-Kaap Museum”. It is necessary to see since it feels like your stepping back in time. Built in by Jan de Waal in 1768, the museum was originally the home of Abu Bakr Effendi, a well-known Turkish scholar and prominent leader in the Muslim community. He was brought here in the mid-19th century to help quell feuding between Muslim factions and is believed to have written one of the first books in Afrikaans. The house has been furnished to re-create the lifestyle of a typical Malay family in the 19th century within a national socio-political and cultural context. Look for works by artist Gregoire Boonzaire, who’s famous for capturing the chaos and charm of neighborhoods such as the Bo-Kaap and District Six.

The Dutch brought slaves that were skilled artisans, political exiles, artisans, religious leader’s famous scholars, and convicts too. Islam, who roots started in Saudi Arabia some 1400 years ago, was brought to the Cape in the 1700’s. Skills and talents passed down from generation to generation accompanied these slaves. Not only skilled artisan but also superb cooks and cuisines blossomed. The Cape Malay Cuisine is not only delicious but also unique and has played a huge role in South African dishes.

A township tour can be one of the most illuminating and life-affirming experiences you will ever have.

 

Thinking about travel to Africa and can’t afford it? Think again.

Many dream and fantasize about Africa. The ultimate destination. A perfect getaway.

Yet many times people waver it off and say 'África me? That is a dream that will stay just that'. Only a dream. Hold on.Think about it.Plan it and peruse the never-ending possibilities ahead.

Make what seems impossible possible.

How?

Stay with the locals and get an adventure at grassroots. There are many homestay opportunities and possibilities to book easily. You get local knowledge, authentic local food tastes and make the most out of the unforgettable journey.

Madagascar

If you desire to travel but are not in the status of high-income cashflows, it is no problem at all. There are loads of opportunities to stay in homes.There is an abundance of information for the student as well as budget travellers.

If you are cautious about safety, everyone is and should as nothing can be 100% safe, using an online network, you get references and reviews with verification.This improves the level of safety.

Tanzania

It is safer, for example, for a female travelling alone to stay with a family and kids, or another person of preference than choosing a hostel with random strangers who come in toxified at odd hours of the night.

Feel the culture. Feel the country. Feel the motherland of Africa

In a hostel, you are bound to meet other travellers. Staying in a home of a local you will get authentic experiences of the country. Choosing profiles you are more likely to link with and get on with when selecting a host.

You get a guided tour, local cuisine, with an abundance of possibilities. These extras will not always be possible in a tourist hotel or hostel.

Establishing a network of friends in Africa is about living with local families wherever you wish to in the magnificent continent of Africa.

There is accommodation in suburbs with the elite and even village and rural accommodation available.

There is a wide range of services available from couchsurfing which is a cultural exchange with no payments involved to services like Airbnb which amounts to hostel rates in an authentic local setting.It may be free but contributions in some of the other way will be expected like cleaning skills and food. Then  there is convenient platforms with a wide range of options like  HomeStay

Ocean City Garden

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
We are situated on the road between three major hotels Sunrise, Kipepeo, and South Beach in Kigamboni , a fifteen minute ferry ride from Dar es Salaam. A walkaway to the beach we are ready to welco...

 

House sitting and other possibilities of exchange labour for travel are other possibilities.The time limitations impact on actual travel experiences

Make travel dreams to Africa reality for all aspiring travelers to reach an unforgettable destination and explore Africa.

 

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#ExploremotherlandAfrica.com

 

 

 

 

 

Tu Nokwe ‘Light of Africa’ -The Morogoro JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL 2017

We tuned together in rhymes of Unison…..

 

 

 

We stood together in times of Unison……

 

 

We share our spirits in harmony and Light - 'Light of Africa' our soul.........

#JUUAFRIKANFESTIVAL

Keeping together across our continent borders . We touch base……

 

Welcome to the Light of Africa

Tanzania Tanzania……

The Juu Afrikan festival in Morogoro

The Light of Africa ‘Tu Nokwe’ in Morogoro Tanzania -JUU Afrikan Festival

Welcome. #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

10 ‘Must See’ Destinations in the Diverse and Colorful South Africa

Many are eager to explore South Africa, the diverse colorful nation with tons to rave about from natural beauty,people,world cities and unique wildlife.

Cape Town deservingly captures global attention, yet South Africa has much more to offer. There are hundreds of destinations to explore in South Africa. Here are ten highlights to note.

 

  1. Cape Agulhas


ATLANTIC AND INDIAN OCEAN MEET, THE SOUTHERN TIP OF AFRICA

Cape  Agulhas is the tip of Africa, where our two great oceans meet, a stone plaque to mark it is placed on the beach.

2.  Table Mountain


Any trip to Cape Town has an activity that all must step up to. A journey to the iconic Table Mountain. An unforgettable landmark to set foot on. You get to view the sea and the city from a 1085m height. The flat top summit has an easy route with the Table Mountain Cableway. It travels up at 10 metres per second. Table mountain has much more to explore with indigenous plants and animals and a nature reserve.

3. Maboneng Precinct- Johannesburg


Maboneng Precinct

Maboneng means the  “place of light”, and that is what the innovative section, the Maboneng Precinct, has become amidst a concrete jungle of red brick construction and warehouse jumbles. The graffiti spilt sidewalks reach an urban vibe, the hippest urban regeneration spot – a cosmopolitan and arty joint. Joburg is re-identifying itself from the slaps of being a wasteland of lost wanderers.

 one of South Africa’s hippest urban enclaves and an incredible example of urban regeneration.” BBC TRAVEL

4. Klein Karoo – Cango Caves


Cango Caves

The Cango Caves are as popular as the ostriches in Oudtshoorn 30 km away. The caves cut from limestone are twenty million years old. The Caves are listed as one of the great natural wonders of the world. The hidden stalagmite chambers inhabited in the stone ages make up the largest cave system in Africa.

There are amazing subterranean caverns open to the public for an unforgettable adventure through tunnels and chambers. One highlight is ‘Cleopatras Needle’, a formation that is 9m high and over 150000 years old.

5. Golden Gate Highlands National Park


The name of the park. ‘Golden’ Gate  Highlands National Park is linked to the golden glittering sandstone cliffs. Located in the Northern Freee State 120km from Bloemfontein, the Maluti  Mountains nestle the park, home to various wildlife including wildebeest and zebra as well as rare birds like the bearded vulture and bald ibis. There is an abundance of activity from horseriding to nature trails and game viewing.

6. Midlands Meander


Midlands Meander

The most recognizable meander in Kwa Zulu Natal offers many discovery routes through the scenic Midlands Meander of Natal. An hour away from Durban, the Meander is 80kms of entertainment, arts and crafts. places to see, shops and over 160 places to sleep in. Encounter craftsmen from herb growers to cheese producers weavers and craft beer, artists, potters, carvers and much more.A haven for watersports enthusiasts for sailing, canoeing, boating and windsurfing near the Midmar Dam.

7. Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park


Kgagaladi Transfrontier Park

Africa’s first transborder conservation area between Botswana and South Africa. It is in the Northern Cape, 250km from Upington, the Kgalagadi Park is the joining of Botswana’s Gemsbok National Park and South Africa’s Kalahari GemsbokPark.

The combined protected area is thirty-eight thousand square kilometres.  In South Africa, part of nine thousand six hundred square kilometres covers the Southern part of the Kalahari desert which is uninhabited.  It offers great opportunities for game viewing of endangered and rare species.

8. Supertubes Jeffreys Bay


Supertubes Jefferys Bay Surfing

Jeffreys Bay, sixty-five kilometres from Port Elizabeth is a top surfing destination and has perfect and predictable right-hand Supertube point breaks

The high-speed waves reach 3 metres varying in length up to 300m. The best waves are in winter between May and the middle of September.

9. Moses Mabhida Stadium


Moses Mabhida Stadium

The Moses Mabhida stadium is popular for hosting international music concerts and sports.It is a tourist attraction with many other linked activities. It has a skycar taking visitors to the arch of the stadium, there is also the 500 step adventure walk up to the 106m arch to get the ultimate panoramic view of the sea and the city. Then there is the Big Rush, Big Swing, a stadium swing that plunges off the arch. There are restaurants and shopping boutiques on the property as well.

10. Sun City


Sun City

Sun City, an hour and a half away from Johannesburg is a popular complex for entertainment and family getaways. Hotels coupled with a popular golf course is a drawcard for tourists and locals. Many regularly flock here to enjoy the Valley of Waves, the casino for gambling and game viewing at the Pilanesberg National Park nearby. The Lost city Palace offers a five-star Africa holiday and has cabanas, game lodges and establishments for camping nearby.

 

 

Welcome to the tastes of Africa.  #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

WELCOME TO JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL

The Light Of Africa – Ready to Shine at the JUU Afrikan Festival,Tanzania2017

 

Travellers tell us about your experiences and recommendation

 

 

 

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The Madagascar Fashion Style

Madagascar inhabitants are comprised of a combination of arrivals on the island almost 2000 years ago. They came from regions from all parts of the world like Arabia,India and the African continent.

These early settlers became the pioneers of Madagascar culture and society created an amalgamation of religion, culture and tradition.


Modern Madagascar is a perfect blend of traditionalism and modernism.


 Fashion in Madagascar

Malagasies take pride in style and appearance and fashion design is in a sense actually indigenous to the island of Madagascar.

Madagascar clothing is unique with spectacular designs and decorated with colourful and bright scenes of daily life.  The colours are created from natural dyes like roots, berries and bark. There is a proverb at the bottom of a “Lamba”

Lambas are made with yarn spun by hand from natural silk. The dyed yarn is hand woven and the silk used is indigenous to Madagascar.


 

 

Accessories and clothing are palettes for creativity. Every village and town in Madagascar have people sporting the most exquisite traditional garments along with some imported style.

 

 

Malagasy indigenous fashions are created from Raffia fabric and Lamba garment and raffia fabric and weave. Extraordinary and versatile made in various brilliant patterns and colours.

The Lamba can be a shirt, a wrap or trouser alternative, used as a baby sling or made into a dress in a moment, This garment is fundamental for women and men as well

The Lamba is traditional dress in Northern Madagascar, “Lamba means cloth but refers to matching fabrics around the waist and around shoulders. Is some sections the Lamba is usually worn by men as ceremonies like offerings and burials. Old men in rural areas on Madagascar plateau areas wear them more often. Unlike men, many women wear  Lamba at all occasions.

Traditional Lamba is used to brighten contemporary jackets and pants and as accessories to western style clothing.

A creative outer garment replaces sweaters or jackets and there is a wide variety to creates unique personal style. Malagasy decorative fashion has developed into the Kreole fashion scene. The Malagasy mix of creative indigenous fabrics blending in with accessories from neighbouring African countries and Eurasia.

The distinctive African flair in a Eurasian flavour. Malagasy designs are cutting edge fashion styles with a blending combination of Asian garments and European hairstyles.

Common in Villages: Hat ‘Satroka penjy” and Long shirt Malabary

 

Design and textile artists from Madagascar make a bold presence on the global fashion scene.

Madagascar design and textile artists shine out in the world of fashion making a bold trailblazing presence on global fashion and entertainment stage.

 

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Timeless Train Journeys In Africa

Travelling is not about the destination. It is about the journey.  There are much quicker ways to get from one point to the next, yet train travels at a slow pace phases out the daily life hustle and bustle rush hour chaotic streams.

It is the ideal escape getaway, savouring moments on the pathway reaching the desired destination.

Trains are a differing dimension, gradual travel embracing experience realms of the beyond.

Cape Town to Dar Es Salaam with Rovos Rail

Rovos Rail

The epic journey takes a full fourteen days. The pride of Africa trip passes through Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe before reaching Tanzania.

A chance to experience diamond towns, historic villages, game reserves as well as Victoria Falls.

The high point is Great Rift Valley where there are dramatic viaducts, switchbacks and tunnels. There is also a twenty-eight day Cape to Cairo journey every two years.

South Africa – Blue Train Journey

Blue Train-South Africa

The Blue train in South Africa is the most famous and has been dubbed as a  5-star hotel on wheels.

The meals, wine, accommodation with scenery along the 994-mile journey leaves from Pretoria taking off to the motherland of Cape Town takes about twenty-seven hours. This comes with stopovers.

There is also a trip from Pretoria to Durban at certain times during the year. This train journey with exclusive silk lines and bathroom gold fittings, cuisines by top chefs and nature scenes from the window is the ultimate experience in Africa

Namibia’s Desert Express

Desert Express

The Desert Express is a train for tourists between Windhoek and Swakopmund as well as Walvis Bay. There are excursions to the Etosha National Park. The elegant dining room is well equipped and conference facilities are on offer as well.The Desert Express in convenient modern and beats the desert heat.

Nairobi’s Jambo Kenya Deluxe

Jambo Kenya Deluxe

The Jambo Kenya Deluxe is a route between Nairobi and Mombasa. The overnight leisure trip from city to coast, savannah giraffes, zebras and ostriches are spotted while savouring gourmet cuisine and fine wines.  Comfortable sleeping berths epitomizes the deluxe of the journey

Tanzania to Zambia with TAZARA

TAZARA

The Tanzania-Zambia Railway (TAZARA):  Kilimanjaro and Mukuba express are passenger trains operating on TAZARA.  It runs for 1860km between Dar Es Salaam and Zambia
Running a few times each week, the journey takes approximately two days and nights. This is for intrepid travellers with little concern for luxury or punctuality. The spectacular scenery makes up for delays and service

 Tunisia’s ‘Lezade Rouge’

Lezarp Rouge

This antique  ‘Lezade Rouge’ tourist train,  runs daily into Atlas mountains foothills in the south of Tunisia.It passes through mining countries on the route from Metlaoui to Redeyef with periodic views. The journey is an hour long in each direction

South Africa’s Shosholoza Meyl

Shosholoza Meyl

An alternative for budget travellers Shosoloza offers intercity journeys between Johannesburg and each major city. The pleasant journey takes the exact same route as luxury trains and costs less than $100. The trains are not elegant but comfortable and save flight hassles between Johannesburg and Cape Town.

Zimbabwe Rail

Zimbabwe rail

Travel overnight between Victoria Falls and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe Rail features the classic 1950s-era British coaches with interiors of wooden panels. Elephants and baboons wander around in great sightings

 Mauritania’s Train du Desert

Mysterious Mauritiana unravels in a   2 story passenger carriage, Train du Desert. Guest spend time at excursion spots like  Chinguetti , the holy city the Azougui oasis, Ben Amira rock monolith.

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

Durban – The Zulu Kingdom in South Africa

  • Townships are the heartbeat of South Africa

The province of Kwa Zulu Natal provides opportunities to experience African culture in authentic first hand Zulu township and cultural tours.


Durban
  • Facts about township matters

The cultural rich etiquette of the soul of South Africa in townships can hardly be rivalled.

Township tours in Durban weave into the rhymes which were pathways for leaders like Nelson Mandela and Mahatma Gandhi. And an adventure to remember with an unforgettable ‘Shisanyama” (barbecue) mouth watering feast.

 

  • Townships were initially established under apartheid rule.
  • Non-whites were forbidden to own or live in property in exclusively designated white areas and confined to underdeveloped settlements.

 

Townships are this day and age are predominantly black or non-white people. Since democracy, the settlements have been developed and upgraded. They are now kaleidoscope suburbs capturing the essence of resilient people. The social vibe and energy is the hub of creativity and small businesses.

Kwamashu

The oldest township in KZN is KwaMashu. Renowned for ethnic arts scene a tour in the mesmerizing location captures the essence of unique culture with a flair.

  • Experience life of KwaMashu residents and the neighbouring townships of Ntuzuma and Inanda. Get into the vibe and release into contemporary Kwaito style dance moves or varieties of hip hop and pantsula.
  • Get into the art vibe with drama performances and Mashkandi, the traditional music of the Zulu.
  • Experience herbalists and healers

Feel the spirit of true  ‘Ubuntu’, the spirit if humanity in Umlazi the second largest South African township

Umlazi epitomises  “African-ness” with its pulsating energy and vibrant culture.

Feel, taste and see  the spirit of Africa in true essence

In 1967, The National Party established it as a black township. In this day Umlazi has emerged into a buzzing township in South Africa filled with shebeens, “Shisanyama” as well as jazz venues, popular for international tourists.

 

Welcome to township treats of note. #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

Top 10 Tantalizing Food Bites in South Africa

 

One who eats alone cannot discuss the taste of the food with others. ~African Proverb

South Africa dishes have influences from all over. French, Dutch, Malay and more.  The cosmopolitan South Africa has a streaming tourist industry. There is loads to do and see from safaris to township tours. Indulge in tantalizing food and wine tours in Cape or visiting some Durban foodie heaven.

To get a taste of South African delights is always reachable as South African migrants are scattered worldwide. Nothing beats authentic travel tastes, but you may just be able to experience SA tastes right next door to your home!

 

  1. Chakalaka

Chakalaka

Chakalaka, a township delight sprouted out all over. The main ingredients are baked beans, carrots, peppers and spiced up with curry. Make your Chakalaka, try the recipe! There is no barbecue(braai) unaccompanied by Chakalaka.


  1. Potjiekos

A dish created from the necessity to cook while on the move in the outdoors. Set up in Afrikaaner tradition, it emerged in the great trek times. Potjiekos became part and parcel of the food culture in South Africa.


  1. Biltong

Biltong

A well-known favourite is Biltong. It started off in a crispy motion of preservation. Today it is a spicy snack revered and loved.


  1. Durban chicken curry

The popular Durban chicken curry is a quick and easy recipe and is perfect with sambal and basmati rice.


5. Milk Tart

Milk Tart

Known as  ‘Melktert’  is the milky way to a custard tart. Imported by Dutch, ‘Melktert’ is SA food and there is an official ‘Melktert’ day celebrated annually on 27 February.

Get ready for a taste of Africa as we bring you meals and deals to tantalize your taste buds leaving you hopping back to Africa in no time.

#ExploremotherlandAfrica

6. Malva pudding

Malva pudding

A dessert that originated in the Cape. Created by Dutch settlers and incorporates apricot jam. Comparable and decadent to toffee pudding, and far better too!


7. Pap

Stiff cornmeal is a famous all over the African continent. It is an essential at all barbeques and perfect for stews and sauces.


8. Apricot Blatjang

Apricot Blatjang is a famous chutney made with dried apricots.A perfect condiment with bobotie or cheese. It is a chutney like texture.


9. Bobotie

Bobotie is a South Africa dish is made with shredded or minced meat, spices and fruit. Topped with bay leaves and savoury custard and baked.


10.Boerewors

Boerewors is a sausage of high quality spiralled in a circle shape, made from beef, game or pork or game meat. It is a must have at all barbecues.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica!

 

 

 

 

The other side of Cape Town-‘Township Vibes’

 

The township reflects joy in freedom, human rights, justice and reconciliation. From shebeens to sangomas, a township visit is a unique, emotional and sensory experience abuzz with vivid social culture. Each township tells its own story about its establishment, its struggle through the apartheid years and its current situation.

A township tour can be one of the most illuminating and life affirming experiences you’ll ever have.

 

Down the road from Cape Town, with its magnificent beaches and world-class restaurants, warm African hospitality awaits in a bustling environment that few visitors to the city ever experience. An offering of an authentic taste of South African Township life leaves and adventurous traveller a unique experience.

B&B accommodation in townships has bright, cheerfully decorated rooms with a strong African Flavour.  Meals at this unpretentious focus on traditional Xhosa dishes.

Gugulethu, Cape Flats

Gugulethu ‘Gugs‘, – our pride -is one of the oldest black townships in South Africa and one of the most energetic and fastest developing.

Gugulethu was established in 1958 because of the migrant labour system. It grew as the number of migrant workers from the Transkei increased and Langa became too small.

It was originally named Nyanga West,  rooms were allocated in hostels, where three men had to share a tiny room.These were times when poverty, oppression and overcrowding were the order of the day under apartheid rule.

The hostels were for men only, no wives were allowed to visit their husbands. Women were left behind in the former Transkei and Ciskei homelands. The hostels remain the oldest buildings in Gugulethu.

In our present day, ‘Gugs’ is a mixture of former hostels and tin shacks, people built for privacy, as well as  brick and mortar houses in the wealthier ranks

‘Gugs’ is a vibrant, thriving community reflecting all classes of South African society. Soak up hot, township jazz at the Uluntu Community Centre, shop at NY1s Eyona Shopping Centre or watch boxing at the Indoor Sports Stadium on NY1.

‘Gugs’ was the first black township to have an information technology centre. Ikhwezi (the star) Community centre is situated just next to the Yellow Door jazz club in NY-3. The centre provides top class training in multimedia and youth development programs. The area has a sports field, community centres and schools.

Eyona Shopping Centre, Gugulethu has the Ubuntu arts promotion and Cyn Catering service situated at the Yellow Door Jazz Café. It is popular for its drama, art and craft stalls, marimba music and top class jazz.

Sivuyile – we are happy – is the tourism information centre in Gugulethu. It opened an art and craft shop in 1999 and assists college art, students and local artist. It also serves as a photographic gallery. Young artists in the community produce sculptures, ceramics, beadwork, traditional clothing and textiles.

The Link, the first independent Black township newspaper in Cape Town, founded in 1997, has its offices in the Sivuyele College.

The best way to experience ‘Gugs’ is to go and see for yourself.

The Direct Action Centre for Peace and Memory (DACPM) in Woodstock runs history and memory excursions and trains former freedom fighters to become excursion facilitators and take visitors to sites that are etched into South African memories: District Six, the Trojan Horse Memorial in Athlone, Langa and the Gugulethu Seven. The excursions have opened up spaces for freedom fighters to start the process of healing and reconstruction.

The tours also create the opportunity for others to listen, interact and understand what so many went through during the liberation struggle and the struggle of today: the struggle for jobs. Most stories that are told are very individual, very personal. And -also important- they are told with dignity.”

Gugulethu Seven Memorial

But the highlight of any trip to ‘Gugs’must be the Gugulethu Seven Memorial

On 3 March 1986, seven young activists were ambushed in a roadblock set up by police in NY-1 Street. The “Gugulethu Seven” as they are known, is one of the most callous examples of security forces operations. Built to commemorate their death, the Gugulethu Seven Memorial was sculpted by South African artists Donovan Ward and Paul Hendricks. The sculpture stands close to where the seven were murdered.

The cut-outs project onto the road surface in a play of sunlight and shadow that brings them back to life.

The work not only commemorates death but life and nation building – it combines elements of ruin or incompleteness with parts that seem to have just been constructed. It was unveiled in March 2000 on Human Rights Day.

Feel the township vibes in South Africa #Explore MotherlandAfrica

 

The Township Vibe in South Africa-IRRESISTIBLE!

 A turbulent interesting past

A fascinating present

A very promising future

South African Townships have an irresistible soul and vibe that will welcome you and give you the experience of a life time!

Alexandra, or “Alex” as it’s affectionately known, is Gauteng’s oldest township. It a cutout section of the affluent suburb of Sandton.

Alexandra was established as a residential area in 1905 by a white farmer who wanted to establish a white suburb and named it after his wife. In 1912 it was transformed into a ‘Native Township’ where black people were allowed to buy land.

When black land owner rights were dissolved by the Native Land Act of 1913, Alexandra witnessed continuous in-migration due to its proximity to employment opportunities in Johannesburg.

Alex is the hub of culture, root culture. It also has its own community radio and TV station. Popular culture like theatres in the townships was a dynamic force which gave life and a dynamic force that gives hope to people.


Soweto is the fifth most popular destination for overseas visitors to Gauteng province. It’s Jozi’s tourism drawcard. One of the biggest attractions is the Mandela Museum, in Vilakazi Street.  The former four-roomed home of Nelson and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is a deeply moving experience, that reminds us of our past, and gives us hope for the future.

One of the biggest attractions is the Mandela Museum, in Vilakazi Street.  The former four-roomed home of Nelson and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is a deeply moving experience, that reminds us of our past, and gives us hope for the future.

Hector Pieterson Memorial

The Hector Pieterson Memorial is three blocks from where 13-year-old Hector was shot and died on 16 June 1976. On the day when students in Soweto marched against the repressive imposition of Afrikaans in schools.

A Soweto trip is incomplete without visiting the Regina Mundi Catholic Church, the largest in Soweto. A spiritual haven for many Sowetans and played a pivotal role in the history of resistance to apartheid.

If you’re planning a wedding how about the Ubuntu Kraal? It’s collection of straw-roofed rondavels that form a homestead, popular as a wedding and conference venue.

The Soweto Festival is held annually every heritage day weekend. The venue is the magnificent Walter Sisulu Square in Kliptown, the site of the signing of the historic Freedom Charter by anti-apartheid organisations in 1955.

This is the ideal place for the people of Soweto to congregate over Heritage weekend as the Square is a national monument. The Soweto Festival centres around an exhibition and day-long entertainment events.

The Katlehong township area smouldered with political tension in the early 1990s and the name was associated with violent protests and a low-level civil war amongst factions.

Art Centre has evolved into a showcase of exquisite ethnic artwork are influenced by township emotional turmoil themes.

Welcome  #ExploreMotherlandAfrica. Join us and for more township vibes…coming soon

 

The Soul of Township Tours in South Africa

The Tales of South African Townships

Township in South Africa reflects the celebration of joy in human rights, freedom, justice and reconciliation. From the experience of shebeens to visits with sangomas.

A township visit is an emotional and unique sensory experience that is abuzz with the vivid social culture. Each township tells a story of its own about how it was established, the struggle through the years of apartheid and the current age it has evolved into.

South African townships have an irresistible soul and vibe that will welcome you and give you the experience of a lifetime!

Alex  –  “Township of Rhythm”

Alexandra Township -Gauteng

Alexandra is affectionately known as ‘Alex’, it is  Gauteng’s oldest township. Initially, it was established as a residential area. This was in 1905 by a white farmer. He aimed for a white suburb and named it after his wife. In 1912 it was transformed into a native township. Black people were allowed land ownership.

In 1913 the land act dissolved land ownership rights by blacks. Alexandra continues in migration as it was close in proximity to the employment opportunities in Johannesburg.

‘Alex’ has an interesting and turbulent and past, a fascinating present, and a very promising future.  It also has it’s own community radio and TV station.

Alex is the hub of culture, root culture is rhythm and vibe.  Alex has been home to luminaries like Hugh Masekela, a renowned jazz maestro as well as Nelson Mandela.

Popular culture like theaters in the townships was a dynamic force which gave life and hopes to the people, it’s a dynamic force that gave hope.

A township tour will give assess to the best shebeens in where you can quench your thirst on the tradition umqombothi, an African beer that is home-brewed, and taste amazing local delicacies.

You can also stock up on arts and crafts from street vendors, curios and explore the world colorful traditional medicine world.

The outdoor markets, the St Hulbert Catholic church, Mandela Yard Precinct and traditional healers create a fascinating new and old blend making Alex a fascinating township tour.

A Visit to  the iconic township of Soweto

Soweto is the fifth most popular destination for overseas visitors to the Gauteng province. It’s ‘Jozi’s’ tourism drawcard.  And one of the biggest attractions is the Mandela Museum, in Vilakazi Street.  The former four-roomed home of Nelson and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is a deeply moving experience, that reminds us of our past, and gives us hope for the future.

The Hector Pieterson Memorial is three blocks from where 13-year-old Hector was shot and died on 16 June 1976, the day when students in Soweto marched against the repressive imposition of  the Afrikaans language in schools

Soweto tours start with,  Hector Pieterson Museum and the Regina Mundi church.No trip to Soweto in Johannesburg is complete without a visit to Regina Mundi, the largest Catholic Church in the most popular Soweto.

It’s been a spiritual haven for thousands of Sowetans, it has also played a pivotal role in the township’s history of resistance against apartheid.

The Ubuntu Kraal is a collection of straw-roofed rondavels that form a homestead, popular as a wedding and conference venue.

Many will also be interested in the Soweto  Festival. The Soweto Festival is held annually

Soweto Festival

The venue is the magnificent Walter Sisulu Square in Kliptown, the site of the signing of the historic Freedom Charter by anti-apartheid organizations in 1955.

This is the ideal place for the people of Soweto to congregate over Heritage weekend as the Square is a national monument.

The Soweto Festival centers around an exhibition and day-long entertainment events.

 The  capturing visit to Katlehong

Katlehong

The Katlehong township area smoldered with political tension in the early 1990s and the name was associated with violent protests and a low-level civil war amongst factions.

This, however, is a thing of the past and in some way seems to make the Art Centre even more of an achievement for being there. Some of the most exquisite examples of ethnic artwork are housed here and the center seems to have been as influenced by the emotional turmoil of the township as its inhabitants once were.

 

Welcome to motherland Africa! Welcome to South Africa!