#CreatepreneurAfrica – Sandile Ngidi : ‘Africa’s Literary Empire’

Born  in South Africa on the Kwa Zulu Natal 'battlefields' of Vryheid, Sandile Ngidi grew up on the south coast of Durban, Amaholongwa.After matriculating at Marianhill High school he entered the literary kingdom.

His soul journey in the world of words led him on a freelance journalism pathway. He ventured into brand communication specialization and became a  dramatist and  Africa’s literary critic of note.

 Sandile wrote the concept paper towards the inception of South Africa’s Poet Laureate prize on behalf of the wRite Associates and the Department of Arts and Culture.

“I am driven by curiosity, a desire to partake in a bigger re-imagination of the human condition”  Sandile Ngidi

An avid advocate of literary translations, in 2006 he translated the classic Zulu novel by Sibusiso Nyembezi, Inkinsela yaseMgungundlovu (The Rich Man of Pietermaritzburg) from Zulu to English. He writes in Zulu and English. 

 

Aflame Books.

He was the editor of the Baobab Literary journal and Realtime youth magazine. His debut poetry collection is friends of the time.

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica – Sandile Ngidi: Africa’s literary King

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I am driven by curiosity, a desire to partake in a bigger re-imagination of the human condition.

How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

Words and the world of words entered my reality at home in my childhood, where my teacher parents always told stories about their world and also had books they used for school but were accessible to me as well.

Early on at high school in 1983, I began trying my hand in poetry. Mimicking really I guess,  but still expressing the conditions of black boyhood in apartheid South Africa.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The world of words, writing, theatre, books etc, all stir the mind and the soul.

What drove you to make money from your passions? 

Nothing really. Money has been incidental until I discovered that one has to support oneself at some stage.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

For my first newspaper article in the Natal Witness Echo in 1987, if I am not mistaken. This newspaper is influential in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands in South Africa, and to know that I could be paid for my passion was a pleasant surprise.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

To give up is to die.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I believe there is something worth contributing, worth the pain and the joy of creating and waiting to be heard. The written word is powerful, it can empower or marginalize, excite or ridicule – writers, especially in the digital age have become the “big eyes” through which the world is seen or hidden.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 

Nothing really at first. Money was incidental until I discovered that one has to support put bread on the table. I guess that is why I have for the better of my writing career, worked as a brand communication and public affairs specialist.

This has enabled me to consult with senior corporate and public sector executives. Clients often ask me to write speeches and opinion editorials. This job helps me convey messages to key target audiences anonymously.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 

Look deeper inside your self and try to bring the best of you. Systematically “murder” your hero as you learn the craft and bring more of you into the imagination pot.

You are valid. Polish your craft by reading, listening and writing every day. Not just for a pay or an applause. Read widely and listen to others more across many spheres of the human condition, the planet and the environment.

 

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

Feature Image by Hugh Mdlalose photography. Coming soon in the #Createpreneur Africa series,  A decade of  Hugh Mdlalose  Creations (photographer /videographer /musician) 

 

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica – La Famosà – Dominican fashion mogul in Uganda

Born in New York with family roots in the Dominican Republic, La Famosà was destined to link with the Waka agency founded by Rosie Motene, the first Pan African talent agency!

“People will appreciate my existence for creating avenues of revenues for the youth that seek lucrative opportunities”

La Famosà: Fashionist Extraordinaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Famosa set off to Uganda with her ultimate Pan-African vision was a mission to gather young women and men in the creations of the fashion world, to build an Africa network, gather ideas and support to inspire and grow through design and color.

“I love Africa, I love everything it’s offering me so far. I’m here to stay!

By the time she turned sixteen, she made it a mission to follow her dreams. She graduated from a technology high school, gained her cosmetology license and burst onto the world scene of fashion!

Her knowledge of hair design and fashion her repertoire as the most reliable and respectable stylist within the US.

A force to reckon with La Famosà spread out towards her screen career and created a  showreel for a reality TV show called: ‘Queens Reign Supreme’  and played the role of Sassy.

Her passion for Africa comes from a soul connection to family and friends alike.  Her love for Africa is contagious excitement she seeks to spread all over the world.

“I chose Africa because I have a vision that I will be the reason entrepreneurs will take control of what they want and need – Lanes will be created exclusively  for the next top designers”

She plans to attend university’s, high schools and middle schools in Africa with the aim to reach out to the youth, motivate them to stay in school and continue to excel.

The ultimate outlook is the creation of handsfree business programs for the inspiring goal achiever. Mold them into CEO in this 500,000,000,000 billion dollar beauty industry.

“I have the strategies, I just need the ones that have the willpower to make the industry go from billions to trillions of dollars” La Famosa

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica –  La Famosà in Uganda!

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

Making people happy, making people feel proud of themselves, changing their aspects on life, building confidence drives me to be better as a person.

It builds something in the way I conduct business. My true passions characteristics are based on how people react off of me and how I treat people. It’s become a lifestyle to reward people with my genuine ways.

I love the feeling when people take a second glance at what I’m
wearing or what I’ve said. It means interest, wondering how it all came about. It gives me a chance to stand up tall and express my desire to inspire.

How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

I found my passion at the age of 10 years old. I noticed it was a passion of mine when my mood changes every time I spoke about hair and fashion. It did something to me emotionally.

It took me away from my childhood nightmares.Whether it’s fashion, hair styling, consulting, anything to do with transforming people exteriors, it made me feel in control and complete as a little girl.

Something I looked up to. It became a dream of mine with hopes of it coming true one day.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me the most about my passion is that I can have a moment be my true self. Expressing myself through art.

I became a person that can advise and teach. It allowed me to make people feel good in my own creative way through creative designing. Introducing them to a new language. Fashion.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money from my passion was when I noticed my idols and my competitors achieving their business goals over and over and over again.. I knew that once I took my talents & skills serious along with making some adjustments to the way I conducted business. I knew right there and then that I can achieve the same. I never doubted my self.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

When I first got compensated for doing something I loved I was 15/16yrs old. I was overwhelmed and it motivated me to always push harder to stay afloat & above. From the age 10-16yrs old, I was hair designing but never got paid for it. I always did it for fun, practice, or just to distract me from my personal issues at home, knowing I was one day going to get paid for what is now my ultimate passion.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

The only thing that kept me going from never ever giving up was the constant monthly reminder. MY BILLS .. hahaha 😂😩. The more money I made, the more responsibilities I accumulated. I knew if I was to ever give up on my ambitious ways I’ll eventually lose everything I sacrificed everything for.

I had no one to depend on but my self and skills. The objective was to remain on top and remain responsible at the same time.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 

I feel like people that I surround my self, friends & family motivate me in so many ways to become more successful, whether it’s negative or positive happening in their lives. My mother didn’t really teach me the valuable lessons I know today. I learn from others peoples mistakes and achievements.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I wouldn’t relay a message to the people that doubted me. I’ll like to take the opportunity if given and give a big THANK YOU to everybody that knew I was going to make it.. those are the people I most appreciate, and thankful for. Positive vibes are what I feed off.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

My advice to the inspiring girl bosses, creative directors, goal achievers is to meditate on your idea, take a step back, set a goal that makes sense to self. Remain realistic, and stop nothing to achieving your goal. Good luck, I believe in you.We all will have a moment of doubt but always stay afloat and focus.

#CreatepreneurAfrica Vincent Moloi : Trailblazer filmmaker capturing human existence dynamics!

 

South African born Vincent Moloi, was born shortly after the turbulent Soweto uprisings in 1976. His soul calling flourished into narratives of his motherland, voicing out the calling of the nation, both in fiction and non-fiction. 

The innovative filmmaker has directed over 50 documentary films and about 10 television series. He received numerous awards including African Trailblazer Award at the International TV Film festival,and MIPCOM in Cannes.  

His latest creation is Tjovitjo, is a drama series based on a world of hardships, dreams, problems, and hopes. It depicts everyday reality through the portrayal of dancers struggling against the system of poverty.

It offers a buffet of gripping emotions, topping the viewership charts and streaming in possibilities.

Vincent Moloi and his partner Lodi Matsetetela pitched the concept to almost every broadcaster in South Africa. All were reluctant a few years back.

Eventually, their passion drove them to fund it themselves, and they missioned to created it with their production company, Puo Pha Productions.

They then sold the series to SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), a national broadcaster in South Africa, retaining  100% copyright ownership.

An industry breakthrough of note, Puo Pha productions dominated at SAFTA’s, the (South African film and television Awards) ceremony in fiction and non-fiction

Skulls of My People,  a Puo Pha Production

  • Best documentary feature
  • Best director
  • Best Cinematographer

Tjovitjo, a Phu Pha Production

  • Best actor,
  • Best drama,
  • Best sound design
  • Best production design
  • Best editing
  • Best Cinematography

You can never really know it until you do it.

Vincent Moloi

Tjovitjo - drama pilot from Vincent Moloi on Vimeo.

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica Vincent Moloi, a filmmaker making waves

 

Tell us what drives you?

Given the times we’re living in, we as artists with influence, have an obligation to be responsible with the tools we have. So I am intent on unearthing and telling uncomfortable stories that will hopefully build us, or at least the future generations.

What is your true passion in life?

Happiness. I always seeking happiness but it is a very slippery emotion. And my family and telling stories are two things that bring me close to happiness. In general, I really like people around me to feel good about themselves. And I always try to include that element in my stories.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

My first love was radio. Very early on in my childhood, I remember how I use to sit outside my grandmother veranda and pretend to be a radio talk show host. So I always enjoyed telling stories and sharing my opinion. Sadly I never made it as a radio host, thank God there was filmmaking.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

Making people happy. I love seeing smiles on people. A smile is what all of us can have, poor and rich. You can’t just buy it.

 

What drove you to make money from your passions?

Hahahaha…sadly I am not at that stage where I am making money yet. At the moment I am still putting money into my passion. It will come when the time is right.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I can’t remember. It is probably because I put it back into my passion as an investment. We have just produced a whole drama series with our own money. This shows how passionate we are about we doing. We are still building for now, but one day we’ll reap the rewards of all the hard work and money we put in.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Failure is not an option. Because I can’t imagine anything else that can make me happy as what I do right now. The idea of failing terrifies me.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

A search for absolute happiness. I know it sounds so utopia but that’s what I want.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

That you can’t stop what naturally going to be.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

That they must learn to try things, do things. You can never really know it until you do it.

 Welcome, #ExploreMotherlandAfrica.

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Visionary Soul Filmmaker Jihan El Tahri

Egyptian filmmaker Jihan El Tahri,rich in roots of diversity and a wealth of world experience,takes us on her soul rhythm journey, a mission to ignite the spirit of the Motherland Africa.

Tuning into insight and wisdom, she captures the heart of African roots beyond maintream media definitions and prescriptions related to what Africa was and wasn't, or what it is and should be.

Starting her career as a journalist, Africa’s legendary filmmaker, Jihan El Tahri. initially worked as a television researcher and news correspondent, covering the politics in the Middle East. This is when she realized the new dawn was on the power of the visual medium.

@Jihantahri Filmmaker, Writer, Producer, Visual Artist …without music nothing gets done!

She then launched into independent filmmaking,  producing and directing documentaries for French Tv, PBS, BBC and a range of other broadcasters internationally.

She has directed over a dozen films including award-winning:

The House of SaudThe Price of Aid, which won the European Media prize in 2004 and

Cuba: An African Odyssey.

The award-winning,”Behind the Rainbow”  explores transition in South Africa.

It chronicles the liberation project of the African National Congress and compromises that eventually led to the historic 1994 elections, the eventual erosion of promises and dreams, raising questions about the present era.

Egypt’s Modern Pharaohs

 

Jihan El-Tahri has also authored two books  The 9 Lives of Yasser Arafat and Israel and the Arabs: the 50 Years War.

She is also an avid visual artist with several exhibitions scheduled throughout the year.

Africa cinema is her passion, telling stories from Africa, for the people by the people.

Filmmaking  comes with pain, heartaches and minimal returns…. but when a film is complete it allows a person  to voice,  to exist, and to be heard, and that makes it worth it when your film continues to make sense, even years later.

 

Meet # CreatepreneurAfrica: Let’s hear it from the legendary filmmaker Jihan El Thari

1. Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

To your first question, what drives you and what your true passion is in life?…..

It’s hard to say what my true passion is….because I guess they all intertwined but talking about film and documentary…

I think what really drives me is a real desire to understand and know and chronicle what happened in the whole post-independence periods.  Why is it the promises and the vision of that moment of independence  that was going to give the people of the continent and the colonized people everywhere….the quality freedom and dignity?Why did not happen, why is that we still there today, I guess that’s the driving question,

but passion if it’s just about what I really am passionate about

  • I’m passionate about music
  • I’m passionate about film
  • I’m passionate about art

So yeah…..I dabble in all three.

 

2. How did you find your passion and how old were you?
Listening to Jihan

#CreaterPreneurAfricaJihanTahriQuestion2

How old was I when I found my passion?

I guess my passion meaning documentary, well like in 1990, so I must have been…..I guess I was ..26 at that time… 1990.

It was during the Gulf war, as a journalist I was covering the Gulf war, and I immediately realized that the game had been overtaken by TVs and no matter how much we wrote, no matter how much we researched, one image was more powerful than anything one did.

But that was just about the image, the way of making films, I think it was a big revelation for me when I saw this film  called “Death of Yugoslavia”, it was educational, it was interesting, it was funny and most of all it finally made sense of what was happening in Yugoslavia.

The war had been on for a few years and the more it went on the more one realized well I don’t understand anything,  so you just left it behind, zapped it …

Suddenly then there was this documentary, that put it together in a way where I could actually understand, and then you started making sense,  and I could take a position. I could think for myself that was the key, thinking for myself.

I guess that’s when I  really started making the kind of films that I make because  I never give conclusions. Its really about trying to chronicle how things happen and how we got there, and once you understand that, from there a person can decide for themselves, where they stand in that particular event.

 

3. What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

#CreateprebeurAfricaJihanTahriQuestion3

What is it that appeals to me most… RESEARCH.  I think I’m really passionate about research mainly because what I really want to do is try and look at stories from a different perspective,  because we’ve been told our stories the whole time through Western eyes, through Western stories.

And when I approach a topic what I really try to do most is see it from our own perspective from a southern perspective from the perspective of the people who actually lived it, rather than the colonial masters or the cold war protagonists.

So I try  and  get to that prism of the story, and so the research cannot just rely on the books and  newspapers and the documents  because they all written from a Western perspective , so one really has to get down to declassifying document,s get down to finding first-hand eyewitnesses finding stuff  that was written in different languages.

I  mean, I’m lucky because I can speak four or five languages, I can actually read in these languages what was written by the people themselves, whereas it’s not the case if you only speak English or French you only get that one perspective.

Yes, so that’s what appeals to me the most.  And I also love putting together the film at the end…at the end of the day the film is made in the editing, you have a narrative you know where you going, but because of time constraints and how it’s going to broadcast.

The film itself is made in the editing and it’s not my favorite part when I have to cut things down, but that first moment of the editing when I lay down the whole story as it was told to me is quite a big moment for me.

4. What drove you to make money from your passions?

#CreatepreneurAfrica JIhanTahriquestion4

I’ll actually answer 4 and 5 together, what drove you to make money from your passion well I don’t actually make money from my passion unfortunately for me.

I guess I could make money if I did it more superficially, but it does take me four to five years to make a film, and because of that most of the time I don’t get paid anything reasonable even.

Just for an anecdote: When I finished “Behind the rainbow”, my accountant as we finalized the account,  and as I was walking out, he stopped he said,  you do realize that the cleaning lady  earned more than you did on this film?”

And it’s because she obviously got paievery timeme she worked.  I had a lumpsum, which is fine in one year but when stretching over  four years, you barely make ends meet …which accounts for me doing other things on the side like teaching and so forth,, so that’s question 4…

5.When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

When was the first time I was paid for my passion? I’m going to stick to the documentary but I could also say photography, my very first job.

When I was 19 was as a photographer and I remember clearly, I was working for Reuters, and my first salary paid for taking pictures that I thought was the most amusing thing as I would have paid to go take these pictures, but now I was being paid to do that.That was when I first started working as a photographer at Reuters, that must have been in 1984 or something.

In documentary when I started documentary, I was already a professional in the sector, so obviously I got paid, meaning I had budgets in which I got paid if there was any leftover!

6. What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

#CreatepreneurAfricaJihan TahriQuestion6

I thought about giving up many times, especially in the middle of the film when things go completely out of sync.

“Behind the rainbow” was a good example, when for six months, absolutely everyone I had interviewed for research and was a 1oo percent onboard of the film suddenly when I came back with a camera, nobody wanted to talk.

It took about six months for me to get the first interview and my cameraman whose German had come to South Africa for the shoot and instead of 26 or 27 days he was paid for the shoot he stayed for six months. That was a very depressing moment.

And my co-producer, Steven Markovitch from Big world cinema, you know, as a producer, he realised that we couldn’t go on like this and everyone wanted to  shut down the project but I’d went too far, I spent already three years, and there was no way I wasn’t going to make that film, especially because I thought it was an important film.

So the short answer to what motivates me  to keep going when I think  should give up, is because I don’t just make films , I really grapple with topics that I think are important for me and people like me,  people who believe in Africa, people who want a better future , so I guess that’s what keeps me going.

 

7. What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

#CreatePreneurAfricaJiahnTahriQuestion7

What motivates me every day to be even more successful?

I don’t actually think of myself as successful.  I just feel I’m lucky to do what I do. and I put my whole heart in it. I’m not sure what successful means because depending on the criteria I m actually not successful at all.

I don’t earn enough money to keep me going’,  so I’m lucky that I have multiple things that I do because it keeps me floating but I engage with what I believe in and what I love and do it to the fullest.

For the past year, for example I’ve been doing visual arts. I started about five years ago, but over the past year I’ve  basically only been doing exhibitions and visual art projects,  and I’ve done at least four exhibitions that year and I have four or five to come this year,  and I love each and everyone, they’re different topics.

And I guess it’s being able to use different formats in order to deal with all the questions you have personally and try to find a way to express them.

So as much as my documentaries are extremely talkative,  my visual arts work or my contemporary arts work there isn’t a single words its just visual, I think having an alternative format to grapple with more or less  same issues is wonderful, so I put my whole heart into it and try to do it as best as I can

8.What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

# CreatePreneurAfricaJihanTahri question8

 

The people who doubted me……  well I guess there’s people who still doubt me. People will always doubt others, but what will I tell them?……. I’ll tell them good luck, go find your own passion and go do something beautiful and that you believe in.

I don’t really pay attention to people who doubt me or don’t doubt me because I don’t particular…I guess…care..

I don’t care. what I’m seen as, as long as I’m doing what I think is the right thing and as long as I don’t overstep boundaries, not politically speaking of course, but overstep boundaries like don’t  forecast in terms of cultural and other things.

I most of the time work with stories that I believe in and care about but I’m not part of the community I’m talking about, like for example my film about Zambia or my film about South Africa.

I lived there I cared about it but I’m a not Zambian and I’m not South African, so I do care about not overstepping cultural borders, that in order for my work to remain relevant, in order for the people from that place identify with it too. but obviously you never win everybody and if you do win everybody  over….then you’ve done something wrong, as there is always one side of the story that wants negate the other,

 9.What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

CreatePreneurAfrica JihanTahriQuestionairre9

 

I must say I get very touched  and almost embarrassed now that my age is advancing, young people come up to me  and tell me that you know  that look up to me or  that I inspire them, it’s very touching  because I guess one never thinks that work one does will resound on a much larger scale

 

What do I have as advice….. I  basically will repeat what I have said over and over hold on to the stories you care about and go out and find  out  about them,

Don’t let people tell you what they about, go find your own angle go expose find discover engage with what matters to you,  and I think even when people tell you oh you not the right person to do so,,oh you this oh you not allowed  that,  forget about all this something that you feel matters to you.

Go out and get it, and give it time and give it love, AND I UNDERLINE, GIVE IT TIME…because in our day and age its much more time than money makes a difference.

Money is obviously important but money is the way lots of people sell there soul, so if you care about something go find money in a different sector, but with your passion, give it TIME, give it LOVE.

And  if it doesn’t give you enough money,  don’t sell your soul for money, get the money somewhere else we all have multiple skills, so find that skill, I’ve translated, I worked as a driver …..I’ve done everything under the sun when I needed money, there’s no shame in working, so follow your passion.

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Pan Africa media proprieter – Our Voice of Africa : Rosie Motene

Rosie Motene,  actor, radio and tv presenter has taken  Africa to the world stage.

No jokes.... the accredited international laughter coach, has excelled the media world as a speaker, global emcee and author of note.


And she has summited Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest peak in Africa more than once! Rosie joined the Africa Unite Campaign to stop violence against women and girls in Africa. She summited Kilimanjaro in 2014 to raise awareness for the Tomorrow Trust

“We all have our own journeys and its important to create that but also at your own pace””

She runs a podcast series, Pan African Connect, engaging with
topics in line with her three passions in
life….. Women, Africa, and the arts.

Another achievement reaching heights is when she founded the first Pan African talent agency, Waka talent agency, representing the multitude of talent from the motherland of Africa, from television presenters, brand ambassadors, digital influencers emcees, and speakers.

ACHIEVEMENTS AND AWARDS

South African Style Awards 2003:

Rosie Motene
Most stylish media personality.

2006

Rosie Motene
Top 5 best dressed
women in South Africa.

N a l e d i T h e a t r e
Awards

Rosie Motene

Award for
role in The Vagina Monologues.

L e g e n d s A w a r d s Ceremony:

R o s i e  Motene

L i f e – t i m e
Achievement Award.

The TAVA:
WAF 2013:
Best producer award and Best African film for
“ Man on Ground” featuring Hakkem Kae Kazim

Women’s advancement forum

Rosie Motene:

Award for her efforts
in fighting against women abuse at the

 

HOTEL RWANDA

Big screen  debut ,
for the Oscar-nominated  film,Hotel Rwanda,



THE OTHER WOMAN

Rosie played the lead in The Heartlands
film, directed by Cindy Lee and lensed
by Lance Gewer who lensed Tsotsi.


NOTHING BUT THE
TRUTH:
Lead actor alongside
Jon Kani in  the filmic adaptation of his
theatrical piece.

 

GENERATIONS: South African Broadcasting Corporation ( SABC1)

BUBOM SANNA:   A drama series themed on aspiring models

TV TOWN: A  television drama for children

STRAY BULLET:

MNET New directions
Patrick Shai film

ZABALAZA: Mzansi magic
show.
Broadcasting Venture

NTV & Spark TV Uganda

Head of productions, programming and acquisitions.


Meet CreatepreneurAfrica- Rosie Motene- Shining Light on Africa

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

Women, Africa, and the arts.

I love being a woman and I am incredibly proud of who I have become. As I
have moved into my 40’s I’ am loving and cherishing the inner strength and
power that I have.
I simply love our continent from his challenges, hidden treasure and power
that it holds.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was a dancer as a child and completed my exams all the way to teachers
level.
After school, I was accepted into the BA dramatic arts and it was at the end of
my first year when a friend pushed me to audition for a play. On the curtain
call on the premiere night, being on that stage, I realized that that was where I
needed to be.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

mmm…… the fact that I can live, eat and breathe it. I can incorporate it into my
everyday life.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

I strongly believe that if you are not passionate about your career and work, you will be unhappy and bored. So over the last decade, I only work on passion-driven projects

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I was in a beacon chocolate advert, whilst studying at Wits.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I have never thought about giving up. I believe that talent is a gift and for me to
give up on that gift from God, would be an insult.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I have inspired many women from all around the world. I am also aware that
my life can be taken away at any point and so every day I aim to live my best
life.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Hahahahaha it’s not about you but thanks for the push and drive.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

Take time to discover you, create a path that defines you and feeds your passion.
Build a thick skin and go out and be whomever you want to be.

#CreatePreneurAfrica- Africa icon Hakeem Kae Kazim- takes the world cinema stage by storm!

 

A trillion words are not enough to spell out the boundless achievements by our Nigerian born Africa icon, lead actor and producer, Hakeem Kae Kazim.

@hakeemkaekazim - INSTAGRAM AND TWITTER

World-renowned actor, Hakeem Kae Kazim is best known for his work in the  Black Sails series and Hotel Rwanda.

Growing up in London. his initial interest in acting was ignited in early years as his passion in school plays and the National Youth Theatre sparked off.

After graduating from Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, he joined The Royal Shakespeare Company and continued classical training.

Hakeem successfully progressed with several appearances in British television, The Bill, Trial & Retribution and Grange Hill, a popular BBC series.

He relocated to South Africa, where he initially became known for the infamous Fresca commercial and several television and film roles. After his portrayal of  Georges Rutaganda in Hotel Rwanda,  an Oscar-nominated, critically acclaimed film, he rooted into international attention.

 

This is when Hakeem followed a range of opportunities streaming his way and relocated to Los Angeles.

He appeared in Slipstream along with  Sean Astin, The Front Line and starred as Captain Jocard, in the huge success, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End.

This followed  X-Men Origins: Wolverine, another blockbuster.

  • Lost
  • Law & Order: Special Victims Unit and Criminal Minds.
  • Colonel Iké Dubaku in Fox television series 24 and the tie-in movie
  • Gotham and Dominion,
  •  Starz series – Black Sails
  • The Fourth Kind
  • Roots: chronicles the life and times of an African slave  sold To America

His latest role is in Dynasty, a critically acclaimed soapie that premiered in 1981, playing  Cesil Colby in the show.

The calm before the storm. 🎬 Dynasty on The CW #hakeemkaekazim #cesilcolby #dynasty #naijameetsusa

He also starred as Ade in  Man on Ground, an Akin Omotoso film. This was reuniting with Akin after initial collaboration with the feature film God is African that highlighted xenophobic attacks in South Africa.

 

He pledges his support for a brighter for the motherland of Africa

“It is time for African story to set stage  from the African perspective on the world stage of cinema”

Hakeem Kae Kazim

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 Welcome! Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica – Hakeem Kae Kazim

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My family and my work drive me

 

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

My passion is my work as an actor/ producer.
I found my passion or first hints of it when I did my first play at school when I was 11. And really truly knew it was my passion after my first year in the National Youth Theatre of Great Britain aged 15.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

Everything about my passion appeals to me.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

Nothing, as I do my passion and am lucky enough to get paid for it.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

My first job after drama school at the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford upon Avon in the U.K.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Never thought about giving up

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I am motivated by the love of my work and the happiness of my family.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Don’t really think about the people who doubted me as they never told me to my face so I don’t know who they are or would be and wouldn’t want to.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

To all those aspiring creatives I say live your passion, for then you will never work a day in your life!!!

 

CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

Cape town filmmaker, Kurt Orderson explored artistic expression in his early lifetime beginnings. After mastering crafts of his creations from his backyard in the Cape 'ghettos'(beyond Table Mountain),he ventured out into the world, rising up to becoming one of Africa's leading filmmakers.

Kurt initiated his career during his studies as a trainee at the SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), earning mere stipends for daily living expenses.

He defined his unique aesthetic voice and was soon acknowledged as a director and cinematographer on several key productions.

He founded his independent production company, “Azania Rizing”.

“Azania Rizing” is a tool for the African diaspora to rise up and map African legacies around the world on a global storytelling platform.

His major works include:

  •  Definition of Freedom, examining the role of  Hip Hop in South Africa. It was screened at the Toronto and Vancouver  hip-hop festival  winning the best documentary award at the Atlanta Hip hop film festival
  •  Tribute to Lucky Dube, the tribute to legendary reggae artist Lucky Dube was filmed in South Africa, London, and Jamaica. It was awarded the Best Documentary  Award at the  Silicon Valley African Film Festival in  2013.
  • The Pan-African Express, a journey of six young men, students from Atlanta who travel to  South Africa and trying to understand people living with  HIV and Aids. The film was funded by The Oprah Winfrey Foundation.
  • Eldorado, a feature chronicles the journey of four friends in a Gauteng township in South Africa. It won the Special mention South Africa Feature film at the  Durban International Film Festival in 2011
  •  Breathe Again,  features Derrick Orderson, a marginalized swimmer from the  Cape Flats who rose above his livelihood in an abnormal society of inhumane prejudice. It was screened at the Encounters film festival and Durban International Film Festival and several film festivals worldwide.
  • The Prodigal Son 
  • Visibly Invisible

“The Unseen Ones”

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds” Bob Marley

Current Projects

Not in My Neighborhood explores spatial violence, current gentrification and the post-apartheid era. It compares Cape Town , Johannesburg and New York uncovering the threads that exist between people that are miles apart.

 

Picture for the documentary Not in my Neighborhood. September 2016 – São Paulo – Brazil

#CreateoreneurAfrica – The Soul Journey of Kurt Orderson

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is ultimately the great history and achievements of Africa, and I guess also within a broad order global perspective is my people that inspire me and drive me. I am from South Africa, a very specific region in South Africa, Cape Town.

More specifically I am from a township from that is part of a strip of what would be known as the “ghettos”,  the Cape Flats, there is a rich history of storytelling, a great significance of the epicenter of what the foundation of the space, basically built on the legacy of apartheid. The legacy of architectural and apartheid spatial planning ideally separated people  (which was an actual policy with the group areas act ) that had a great significance of breaking up families, literally…… families scattered.

I think what maintains a traditional oral form of storytelling, obviously remained significant, it inspired my body of work ultimately that’s my drive, Africa’s history, Africa’s achievements. One is inspired by  Africa’s legacy, the epicenter of academia and  Timbuktoo…storytelling and the arts and crafts of storytelling ultimately started there and spread across the globe.

My true passion….well I am very passionate about just listening, sitting and listening to people telling stories, whether happy or sad,  ultimately passion for me personally, is driven by a deep desire of wanting to change the landscape of..change  how people perceive each other. I think it’s those stories of those people who done it in the past and are still doing it, that’s what drives my passion. I am inspired by their passion, I think I apply it to my life.That for me is what passion is. Passion goes deeper, the engine or driving force for one to do something. I think ultimately wanting to do something is ultimately passion…the driving force…

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

How did I find my passion….well that’s an interesting question? I think for me when I finished high school, I was definitely inspired by the visual medium and visual arts. There was obviously the influence of television and Hollywood tv,  I guess, but also my parents influenced me.

My father was a screen printer, which is ultimately a visual artist, although he didn’t call himself that, based on conditioning of the system that shaped him, apartheid South Africa. The idea that you were limited to do certain things when it comes to art black folks were deprived in a large historical moment of what the status quo says what you do and what you can become. My father is a strong reference to creating images and applying it to a t-shirt, applies similarly script to screen.

I think its an interesting analogy, metaphor for making films, taking a rich traditional medium and applying it to my work. I think that is how I found my passion.

How old was I?   I think my first reference to start noticing…I don’t know if I can say noticing, more where I picked up the idea that I was passionate about the visual medium, I think I was maybe thirteen years old or fourteen…..

I was locked out of my parent’s house, of course. That time there were no cellphones. I’m from a family of a family of five kids, my parents both worked, I was locked out one day.  I went to the backyard, my father had a workshop in the back of the yard, and I found a hammer and flat nose screwdriver.

I used the hammer and flat nose to carve out my name on a piece of wood and was quite impressed by myself. Wow, no one before that necessarily initiated anything like that. I wasn’t exposed to artistic expression and multiple forms of what artists do, I carved out my name, varnished it and made it immaculate. Later on meeting people who carved for a profession, creating amazing things. I always reference my first carving, that was my flame of inspiration for being an artist, use a visual medium for storytelling.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What about my passionate appeals to me the most… I guess the privilege to being a filmmaker, that being my passion but also to add to that, I feel very blessed to basically get paid for my passion, for my hobby… I would say …because we love film so much I  will do it for free, that’s how deep our passion for cinema lies…and getting paid to do something you love, your passion is a heavy blessing.

What appeals to me most is the idea of  shared history and shared knowledge, when someone allows you into their household to tell you their stories…. you being inspired and, relating on a level of  “oh I knew someone who had a similar idea about this or that .”

 I think that is what the driving force is …..sharing communal space, sharing narratives, sharing stories,  sharing politics, sharing knowledge….that for me a strong appeal to my passion…

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money out of my passion…well you know in real talk, not to romanticize the question too much. We, unfortunately, live in a very capitalist society, we inherited capitalism,, were born into a capitalistic society…..that on one level, right,, that reality of things, we need to eat right, we need to sustain ourselves… in terms of monetary exchange we apple or tomato,whatever……what well I just realised that my craft, my talent, my blessing, I can get paid for it.

For me, there was a strong driving force around craft, like crafting what is my voice, what is my aesthetic, what does Kurt bring across in a common sharing space as a filmmaker as a storyteller. It was first defining my voice, after defining that idea, that is when I felt to make money.

People  want to hire you, because they want that aesthetic that you ideally represent, that was my passion for making art and getting paid for my art, as an independent filmmaker, as an African filmmaker, things are rough out there…and we want to tell our own stories on our own terms, the system itself makes it very difficult for us to sustain ourselves. I need to work like a plumber who works with tools and I need to buy those tools. That is the reality of things

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

The first time I got paid for something… I can’t recall exactly when that was when that moment was…there was a few moment I think. I think  I worked on a television show and I was a contestant, but I also worked on a show. It was a show on SABC2, I was like 18 or 19.

We were trainees and there was a little  stipend that they paid us for traveling money or whatever. It was for generic work on set like organizing cables and assisting the floor, production. I remember very little , but that’s when I realised you can get paid for this. I was still studying at that time as well.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going. I have come through multiple crossroads moments asking myself is this really sustainable, what I do, filmmaking? Filmmaking is really hard, difficult, expensive artistic form to choose. A painter can get some canvas and some paints  make a  killer piece, get to an art market  for a million and boom there we go

For filmmakers, the reality of getting a camera, getting all the equipment you need, and then on top of it, getting a team to operate the tools, that’s a whole process on its own. These things are hard when you off the grid and not part of the mainstream in the system and don’t necessarily want to be part of it.

That’s a very conscious choice, you can just join tv and become a commissioning editor, produce for television and things will be different, it will be a completely different narrative, everything is there,, there is funding for you and they hire you.

Food, clothes and shelter have no politics.

Mutabaruka

As an independent filmmaker or producer, it is very difficult… I only recently mastered the art form of really raising money for my films, for many years my films were independent, self-funded at times.

Now its like I understand more about the industry, how to write the right proposals, and apply to the right people and getting the money and managing the money.

When you at the lowest moment at the crux, paying rent, paying teams, paying crews, and rejections. Rejection is a big thing for filmmakers , filmmakers are sensitive beings, we are fragile as well  in this…. broken world

These are all the challenges that come on your journey, it applies to life as well… life ain’t easy.  The world is not nice, the world is cruel, the life we find peace and sanity within ourselves, the people close to you. There are your therapists, they are your motivational speakers, they push you and say we believe in you, that’s what keeps me going.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 

What motivates me to be successful, what motivation every day. Whats the motivation?  I think this idea that, on one level is that  African history, African stories were for the longest time ever was told through the voice of the colonizer and the aesthetic and the lens of the colonizer…..

These were told in a biased fashion…for me now, as a fellow African filmmaker, it is our duty. I feel strongly for film to be part of the restoration process, the healing journey that we are experiencing and going through as black people across the globe and the trauma that we collectively experience.

How do we heal? What are the healing mechanisms? Now to be honest with you, we don’t have a clear answer to that question. I feel collective communal sharing through a  very powerful visual medium like television or film, then you can project to the rest of the world and share that and say in order for us to be this idea of one world and one shared history.

Everyone has to have the opportunity to share their stories through there own  POV or point of view,  I think that’s powerful ways of sharing. We all have common stories. We share a common history of people all over the world which ultimately makes us human.

Every generation blames the generation before them.

 

Racial ideas and ideology, culture and religion etcetera, are just all divisive mechanisms put in place for a form divide, rule and conquer….not to be cliched,  we have the same blood and all of that. I have transformed, transgressed that phase. I have passed that idea

Anger is fine. Anger is important. We have to be angry. We can’t all just hear  I am sorry and forgive right now,

What if I don’t want to forgive you right, now, and maybe  I want to make a film about that as part of the idea of forgiveness, as collective forgiveness.

That makes film become an interesting mechanism and medium, for multiple purposes. I feel,  personally, we can use film a methodology of social healing for healing the self and healing communities.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

What I have to say about all the people who doubted me…interesting question.  I always think about, one person comes to mind, a schoolteacher.

I wasn’t necessarily the greatest student, to be honest in high school.  I  probably could have done more. I was like, reckless and mischievous. I would say, I gave a lot of trouble.

Was I a rebel? Not sure, I don’t want to throw those words around. One teacher just didn’t like me. I was thinking about her the other day,

I think you always doubted me, I don’t think you ever believed in me, and now that my work is out there in the mainstream? I wonder if she saw my name out there. I wonder what she would think, after seeing what I had done.

I don’t want to reference people that doubted me.  I am not going to make a film for people. I make films am driven to or inspired to make. I don’t care about whether people agree with my standpoint, I love those who love me on the real level, beyond blood, blood relatives. My family is universal.  I am very blessed. We share this brokenness.As a broken people, we come together and we form this path of healing, the heal of our wounds….

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

What advice do I give to those aspiring creatives that look up to me?

The advice ideally would be to always use motivation. The idea of keeping it moving or just do it.  Life is about the idea of inspiring the other, inspiring other people. I think for me,  that is what life is about. Me inspiring other people and continuing the human change of inspiration.

One has to know your craft, know your blessing, identify your blessing.  But also knowing that this is a  very complicated world that we living in. There will be multiple stumbling blocks with a lot of us.  You carrying the torch, you carrying the great torch of your ancestors. You dont have a choice  , you have to keep that torch alight. That is the flame, the driving force, the fuel.

More important is to have a voice. Have a political voice. I don’t mean party politics.  Having a geopolitical view of the world and its complexities. An understanding of global politics. Deciphering the bullshit of what the news tells you, projecting that in your work. Be that change you ultimately want to see.

What you see is what you see. What you know is different

Mutabaruka

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Slavery is not African history. Slavery interrupted African history.

Mutabaruka

“#CreatePreneurAfrica” – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

My venture continued. The final touches took an extraordinary connection – The Journey of my soul. My conversations with Tu Nokwe sparkled the final touches of #CreatepreneurAfrica.

An excerpt from the “Publication of the Millenium”, #Createpreneur Africa: Tu Nokwe- ‘The Light of Africa’

Meet our CreatePreneur™,Tu Nokwe,a legendary musician all the way from South Africa. 

Born and raised during the mainstream helms of the detrimental apartheid era into an artistic family that chose to soar above the pressing system and created Amajika.

This was a youth and child development arts organization to boost self-esteem and counteract the collating mental abuse that shattered mass populations emotionally.
We explore her breathtaking lifestyle, delving into the roots of soul inspiration as we explore her pathways, sharing her journey of self-discovery on a road of survival.

Tu Nokwe,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
My passion.My passion.Where do I start? We could end up with episodes of my true passions as they flow into so many channels. Well as you know, my outlet of expression is the creation of sounds and soothing soul rhythms, pulsating heartbeats in blissful melodies.

“I am creative, I am physical, and I am mental. I am emotional, but most of all I am a spiritual being having a human experience. That is just the beginning of the “Journey of My Soul”

How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I think I was born into it and grew up thriving in the presence all around me. My inner drive & determination fuelled me to learn to play the guitar without a guitar in my hands, but two chairs strung with wool from one chair to the other;using an old guitar tutor to position the fingers in cord formations and coordination. 

My career started when I was eighteen months old! In a commercial for a soap brand. I come from a family of musicians rooted in historical ingenuity of memorable creations.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
It is an outlet of soul expression. I explore the mantra

‘Order creates comfort’. Creative self-management is the core of my spirit as I share and display self-management tools leaving those around me invigorated with a soul-filled purpose.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
The gift of abundance is an asset, allowing open doors to explore. Positive affirmations to call on wealth is a stepping-stone to encounter all barriers in the most lucid times and delve into ‘The Light of Africa’, beaming promise of abundance. 

Africa is rooted in wealth despite the world image of poverty-stricken and downtrodden bereavement that is propagated and installed in the mass media. We are born on the soil rooted in wealth and treasures beyond human imagination. It is ours.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Every engagement was abundant on spiritual rewards. My first performance that brought in a cash flow was at the age of 18 at a wedding with the ‘Black Angels’, a local band. And then when I turned 13  at the annual jazz festival 'Milk Africa'(with the “Black Angels” - the Sneddon Theatre at the University of Natal in Kwa-Zulu Natal & the epic movie 'Shaka Zulu'. When I was 18, I earned a living doing African braids at a hair salon.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I launched the first African Diary - Journey of my Soul” over eight years. Initially it was my supportive tool for self-management. 

The project sparked off out of a concerned calling out from the lack of purpose and low self-esteem that brewed on a daily basis. My resilience to counteract all obstacles, keep focus and having my effective presence engraved in all souls I touched with my talent. I never gave up; I knew there were many doors open amongst the few that closed before me.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My mantra I never cease to chant is ‘Order creates comfort. I am a spiritual being and give thanks each day for all my blessings. The campus for my state of being is joy & happiness. Not everything may come to you at the time you desire it to. However, in Gods time, what is meant to be will be.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
All I can say to those who doubted me is advise them to rise above their fears and soar at rising heights. We all need somebody to lean on.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
“Journey of my Soul” was initially used by uprising performing artists in Amajika Youth and children arts under the auspices of the Nokwe Creative development foundation founded by my family. 

During 1976 when there was a need to boost, self esteem in the helm of the grueling apartheid System in my country. It became clear that as an artist my purpose was to devote time and energy to empower the children of Africa. 

I discovered that self-work had to begin with me. Once I had a holistic understanding of myself, I could reach out to others. My advice to aspiring creative’s is journey to define you and rediscover your LIFE purpose. If you follow my life story, my hope is that you will explore exercises and concepts to develop who you are. I wish you all the best with the ‘Journey of your Soul’

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica-Andrea Dondolo,Queen Spirit Shining Light in South Africa

‘Rise above circumstances and become a beacon of hope…….

Nomasebe Andrea Dondolo

How did it all begin? The journey on the beacon of hope pathway?
It was a calling.........a calling for South Africa. The need for patriots to nurture, uphold and defend the honor of our country, of our continent, through our actions and our beliefs.

Welcome to the world of Andrea Dondolo!

 

 Spirit of a Queen – The rise of Andrea Dondolo

Award-winning actress from Eastern Cape, Andre Dondolo is a writer, a cultural activist,  a community leader, a storyteller, a Ímbongi (Xhosa praise singer), a talented bead crafter and a businesswoman.

She runs “Calabash Storyteller” a township talent agency and her own clothing line. Her other activities are storytelling workshops for children and adults.

Calabash Storytellers is an NPO focused on creating dialogue through the arts, culture, and heritage. Township Talent is a business based on innovation design

Image may contain: 2 people, text

Her early studies in human rights at the University if the WesternCape and a drama diploma with the “New Africa Theatre Association”, led her into professional productions like “Romeo and Juliet” and “Dancing 2 patterns” at the Cape Baxter Theatre.

She has featured in international feature films, “The Final Solution” as well as “The Piano Player.” A household name, South Africa television has her featured in multiple shows.

Createpreneur Africa- Andrea Dondolo

Tell us what drives you?
The need to live a purpose driven life rather than just existing knowing that after each fall you must get up and get going bruises and all are just your own scars.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
Wow, I believe it always been there, all it took was alignment and opportunity so I guess as soon as I could reason and manage the conversation with my mind, heart and soul, I nailed it, To be exact, I guess at around 25.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The adrenaline and fear that fuels appeal to me.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money makes the world go round, if you make it while you doing what you love, you've nailed it.
When was the first time you got paid for your passion?
In the year 1999, it was a theatre show called "The Good heart" at Baxter theatre while finalizing my studies at New Africa Theatre Association.
What kept you going when you thought you were giving up?
My son and competitive spirit.
What motivates you every day to be more successful?
My son.
What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?
Well  my life is exactly that, my own, live yours and prosper, by the way, no one died and put you in charge of my life, live yours.
What advice do you give creatives who look up to you?
Just run your race and keep your focus on the ball......

 

 

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica. Soul words of wisdom, CreatepreneurAfrica

The other side of Table Mountain – Cape Town


Planning to travel in Africa?  The magnificent Table Mountain is a drawing card and the starting point is the infamous Cape Town for most… today we look over and behind Table Mountain.
Table Mountain

The perks of traveling to Africa are endless. Instead of scanning the game parks for rhino or setting off for a day sampling Cape chardonnays, take a  look at the other side.

The townships of Cape Town….. You inhale the roots of freedom, exhaling air of human rights, justice, and reconciliation. A flow from shebeens to sangomas, the emotional sensory vibe sets you sparkling off with a vivid social culture. Nothing is amiss as every township bubbles with its own unique story about its struggles and how it evolved and revolved to its current state.

A treasure in the center of Cape Town – Bo-Kaap

Bo-Kaap

Beyond the hustles and bustles, just beyond the city of Cape Town, you find Bo-Kaap.

The “Bo Kaap” is one of the most interesting parts of Cape Town culturally and historically. Colorful houses, steep cobbled streets, the muezzin’s calls to prayer, and children traditionally dressed for Madrassa add to this unique Cape experience. It is a multicultural area, tucked into the fold of signal hill. Use the cobblestoned streets as your guide and you will be lead into a lively suburb filled with brightly colored houses from the nineteenth and seventeenth century, shrines of Muslim saints, an abundance of beautiful Mosques, and the very first mosque that existed in South Africa.

Use the cobblestoned streets as you are lead into a lively suburb filled with brightly colored houses from the nineteenth and seventeenth century, shrines of Muslim saints, an abundance of beautiful Mosques, and the very first mosque that existed in South Africa.

The residents of Bo-Kaap are mostly descended from slaves who were imported to the Cape by the Dutch during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. They came from Africa, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, and Java Malaysia. Some of them were political exiles and convicts. They were known as “Cape Malays”, which is incorrect as most of Bo-Kaap’s residents are not entirely of Malaysian descent. Their many Indonesian traces of vocabulary in the dialect of Cape, for example, “trim-

They were known as “Cape Malays”, which is incorrect as most of BoKaap’s residents are not entirely of Malaysian descent. Their many Indonesian traces of vocabulary in the dialect of Cape, for example, “trim-makaasi” thank-you, as well as  “kanalah” please! There are also many words, which have also been substituted with Afrikaans.

Funnily enough, Afrikaans evolved as a language of its own through a simplification of Dutch so that the slaves could communicate with the Dutch and each other since they all came from different countries and cultures. Muslims were the first to write texts in Afrikaans.
Cape Carnival

Each year on the 2nd of January, the Bo-Kaap celebrates a big street party, the “Coon Carnival” in the center of town. It was originally introduced by the Muslim slaves who celebrated their only day off work in the whole year. Nowadays men, woman, and children march from the Grand Parade to the Green Point stadium, singing, and dancing.

 

Kramat

Kramats or Muslim Shrines are burial sites of Saints of Islam. Cape Town residents have for a number of generations paid their respects these Shrines. There are three Karamats in Bo Kaap, and Signal Hill behind BoKaap has two.

 

 

Bo-Kaap Museum

One of the oldest buildings in Wale Street 71 houses the “Bo-Kaap Museum”. It is necessary to see since it feels like your stepping back in time. Built in by Jan de Waal in 1768, the museum was originally the home of Abu Bakr Effendi, a well-known Turkish scholar and prominent leader in the Muslim community. He was brought here in the mid-19th century to help quell feuding between Muslim factions and is believed to have written one of the first books in Afrikaans. The house has been furnished to re-create the lifestyle of a typical Malay family in the 19th century within a national socio-political and cultural context. Look for works by artist Gregoire Boonzaire, who’s famous for capturing the chaos and charm of neighborhoods such as the Bo-Kaap and District Six.

The Dutch brought slaves that were skilled artisans, political exiles, artisans, religious leader’s famous scholars, and convicts too. Islam, who roots started in Saudi Arabia some 1400 years ago, was brought to the Cape in the 1700’s. Skills and talents passed down from generation to generation accompanied these slaves. Not only skilled artisan but also superb cooks and cuisines blossomed. The Cape Malay Cuisine is not only delicious but also unique and has played a huge role in South African dishes.

A township tour can be one of the most illuminating and life-affirming experiences you will ever have.

 

The Soul of Township Tours in South Africa

The Tales of South African Townships

Township in South Africa reflects the celebration of joy in human rights, freedom, justice and reconciliation. From the experience of shebeens to visits with sangomas.

A township visit is an emotional and unique sensory experience that is abuzz with the vivid social culture. Each township tells a story of its own about how it was established, the struggle through the years of apartheid and the current age it has evolved into.

South African townships have an irresistible soul and vibe that will welcome you and give you the experience of a lifetime!

Alex  –  “Township of Rhythm”

Alexandra Township -Gauteng

Alexandra is affectionately known as ‘Alex’, it is  Gauteng’s oldest township. Initially, it was established as a residential area. This was in 1905 by a white farmer. He aimed for a white suburb and named it after his wife. In 1912 it was transformed into a native township. Black people were allowed land ownership.

In 1913 the land act dissolved land ownership rights by blacks. Alexandra continues in migration as it was close in proximity to the employment opportunities in Johannesburg.

‘Alex’ has an interesting and turbulent and past, a fascinating present, and a very promising future.  It also has it’s own community radio and TV station.

Alex is the hub of culture, root culture is rhythm and vibe.  Alex has been home to luminaries like Hugh Masekela, a renowned jazz maestro as well as Nelson Mandela.

Popular culture like theaters in the townships was a dynamic force which gave life and hopes to the people, it’s a dynamic force that gave hope.

A township tour will give assess to the best shebeens in where you can quench your thirst on the tradition umqombothi, an African beer that is home-brewed, and taste amazing local delicacies.

You can also stock up on arts and crafts from street vendors, curios and explore the world colorful traditional medicine world.

The outdoor markets, the St Hulbert Catholic church, Mandela Yard Precinct and traditional healers create a fascinating new and old blend making Alex a fascinating township tour.

A Visit to  the iconic township of Soweto

Soweto is the fifth most popular destination for overseas visitors to the Gauteng province. It’s ‘Jozi’s’ tourism drawcard.  And one of the biggest attractions is the Mandela Museum, in Vilakazi Street.  The former four-roomed home of Nelson and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is a deeply moving experience, that reminds us of our past, and gives us hope for the future.

The Hector Pieterson Memorial is three blocks from where 13-year-old Hector was shot and died on 16 June 1976, the day when students in Soweto marched against the repressive imposition of  the Afrikaans language in schools

Soweto tours start with,  Hector Pieterson Museum and the Regina Mundi church.No trip to Soweto in Johannesburg is complete without a visit to Regina Mundi, the largest Catholic Church in the most popular Soweto.

It’s been a spiritual haven for thousands of Sowetans, it has also played a pivotal role in the township’s history of resistance against apartheid.

The Ubuntu Kraal is a collection of straw-roofed rondavels that form a homestead, popular as a wedding and conference venue.

Many will also be interested in the Soweto  Festival. The Soweto Festival is held annually

Soweto Festival

The venue is the magnificent Walter Sisulu Square in Kliptown, the site of the signing of the historic Freedom Charter by anti-apartheid organizations in 1955.

This is the ideal place for the people of Soweto to congregate over Heritage weekend as the Square is a national monument.

The Soweto Festival centers around an exhibition and day-long entertainment events.

 The  capturing visit to Katlehong

Katlehong

The Katlehong township area smoldered with political tension in the early 1990s and the name was associated with violent protests and a low-level civil war amongst factions.

This, however, is a thing of the past and in some way seems to make the Art Centre even more of an achievement for being there. Some of the most exquisite examples of ethnic artwork are housed here and the center seems to have been as influenced by the emotional turmoil of the township as its inhabitants once were.

 

Welcome to motherland Africa! Welcome to South Africa!

 

 

 

South Africa’s Cultural Soul – The roots of Township Tours

South Africa – few can rival South African soul in the townships. Today we explore Kwa-Zulu Natal.  Walking the paths of some of the greatest leaders.

It’s another world and another time. This is part of the old Africa, where the amaZulu ruled unchallenged, a place of beaded headdresses and rawhide shields, beehive huts, and a lifestyle that properly belongs to the great age of Shaka.

Gain an insight into the amaZulus’ traditional way of life their beliefs, crafts, songs and dances at Shakaland, the open-air museum near Eshowe.

This is the oldest town in Zululand. Shakaland is also the oldest Zulu Cultural Village in Zululand, originally built as a scenery for the movie “Shaka Zulu”.

It’s been converted into a Zulu homestead with thatched beehive houses arranged in a circle around the central cattle kraal. Visitors stay in beehive houses, with all the modern conveniences.

 

The village overlooking the Umhlatuze Lake offers the true Zulu cultural experience and traditions, including pottery, beadwork, beer making and tasting as well as magnificent foot-stomping, ground shaking demonstrations of traditional Zulu dance.

Assegai-wielding warriors will teach you how to fight. You can also witness the age-old methods of making spears and shields, skills that are to a large extent disappearing. This is one of the few men who still know how to make the broad stabbing spear introduced by King Shaka. A memorable part of the tour is the spear throwing and stick-fighting demonstrations.

The  Memorable Adventures of Zululand

Kwa-Zulu Natal

The Kwa-Zulu Natal province is rooted in the legacy of the Zulu nation. There are ample opportunities to explore the fascinating world of the Zulu’s.

There are many private as well as provincial game reserves showcasing the abundance of biodiversity in the region.  You get an authentic safari experience and a historical viewpoint through the battlefield routes of the historical town, Vryheid which has  tea plantations and cattle ranches.

The Battlefields Route is significant as it was is where there were historical clashes between Zulu,  Brit, and Boer (farmer). The Kwa Zulu Natal battlefield region extends from Thukela river at Dolphin coast to Richards Bay further in the north to Paulpietersburg.

Paulpietersburg is 50hm to the north and links the inland of South Africa with the coast of  Zululand. This town is widely known for sulfur springs and therapeutic spas.

The major attractions are Zulu culture, birdlife, and many nature and game reserves.

Zulu culture is all over South Africa, but not as poignant as the Zulu kingdom.

Visitors can feel and taste true Zulu hospitality in dance, food, and song. There is an opportunity to become part of authentic Zulu weddings, assist with chores in the village and even visit a local sangoma (traditional healer).

You can take an ox-wagon visit to the Zulu beehive huts. Or even explore local shebeens, traditional medicine outlets. You get to learn how locals adapt age-old traditions into modern living.

 

  • A Zululand heritage experience is by stopping at Melmoth ‘where the legend King Shakas was born ‘the Valley of Kings’
  • The Emakhosini Valley is the site of graves of many Zulu Kings
  • The Zululand Birding Route has 650 recorded species of birds. The Dlinza Nature Reserve is a popular spot for birding.
  • Vast nature and game reserves from subtropical forest reserves  along the coast as well as game reserves further north

The biggest attraction in the KZN region is Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park.

It is the oldest in Africa and home to the famous big 5 in Africa. Rhinos, drive game lions, elephants, buffalos and leopards. There are self-drive game as well as guided walks.

 

Wilderness trails provide an intimate experience in the bush

End the Zululand expedition round off will be Richards Bay. The large town boasts a stunning scenery of the wetland.

 

Welcome to Motherland Africa......

 

Thinking about travel to Africa and can’t afford it? Think again.

Many dream and fantasize about Africa. The ultimate destination. A perfect getaway.

Yet many times people waver it off and say 'África me? That is a dream that will stay just that'. Only a dream. Hold on.Think about it.Plan it and peruse the never-ending possibilities ahead.

Make what seems impossible possible.

How?

Stay with the locals and get an adventure at grassroots. There are many homestay opportunities and possibilities to book easily. You get local knowledge, authentic local food tastes and make the most out of the unforgettable journey.

Madagascar

If you desire to travel but are not in the status of high-income cashflows, it is no problem at all. There are loads of opportunities to stay in homes.There is an abundance of information for the student as well as budget travellers.

If you are cautious about safety, everyone is and should as nothing can be 100% safe, using an online network, you get references and reviews with verification.This improves the level of safety.

Tanzania

It is safer, for example, for a female travelling alone to stay with a family and kids, or another person of preference than choosing a hostel with random strangers who come in toxified at odd hours of the night.

Feel the culture. Feel the country. Feel the motherland of Africa

In a hostel, you are bound to meet other travellers. Staying in a home of a local you will get authentic experiences of the country. Choosing profiles you are more likely to link with and get on with when selecting a host.

You get a guided tour, local cuisine, with an abundance of possibilities. These extras will not always be possible in a tourist hotel or hostel.

Establishing a network of friends in Africa is about living with local families wherever you wish to in the magnificent continent of Africa.

There is accommodation in suburbs with the elite and even village and rural accommodation available.

There is a wide range of services available from couchsurfing which is a cultural exchange with no payments involved to services like Airbnb which amounts to hostel rates in an authentic local setting.It may be free but contributions in some of the other way will be expected like cleaning skills and food. Then  there is convenient platforms with a wide range of options like  HomeStay

Ocean City Garden

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
We are situated on the road between three major hotels Sunrise, Kipepeo, and South Beach in Kigamboni , a fifteen minute ferry ride from Dar es Salaam. A walkaway to the beach we are ready to welco...

 

House sitting and other possibilities of exchange labour for travel are other possibilities.The time limitations impact on actual travel experiences

Make travel dreams to Africa reality for all aspiring travelers to reach an unforgettable destination and explore Africa.

 

Welcome

#ExploremotherlandAfrica.com

 

 

 

 

 

Tu Nokwe ‘Light of Africa’ -The Morogoro JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL 2017

We tuned together in rhymes of Unison…..

 

 

 

 

We stood together in times of Unison……

 

 

We share our spirits in harmony and Light - 'Light of Africa' our soul.........

#JUUAFRIKANFESTIVAL

Keeping together across our continent borders . We touch base……

 

Welcome to the Light of Africa

Tanzania Tanzania……

The Juu Afrikan festival in Morogoro

The Light of Africa ‘Tu Nokwe’ in Morogoro Tanzania -JUU Afrikan Festival

Welcome. #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

10 ‘Must See’ Destinations in the Diverse and Colorful South Africa

Many are eager to explore South Africa, the diverse colorful nation with tons to rave about from natural beauty,people,world cities and unique wildlife.

Cape Town deservingly captures global attention, yet South Africa has much more to offer. There are hundreds of destinations to explore in South Africa. Here are ten highlights to note.

 

 

 

  1. Cape Agulhas


ATLANTIC AND INDIAN OCEAN MEET, THE SOUTHERN TIP OF AFRICA

Cape  Agulhas is the tip of Africa, where our two great oceans meet, a stone plaque to mark it is placed on the beach.

2.  Table Mountain


Any trip to Cape Town has an activity that all must step up to. A journey to the iconic Table Mountain. An unforgettable landmark to set foot on. You get to view the sea and the city from a 1085m height. The flat top summit has an easy route with the Table Mountain Cableway. It travels up at 10 metres per second. Table mountain has much more to explore with indigenous plants and animals and a nature reserve.

3. Maboneng Precinct- Johannesburg


Maboneng Precinct

Maboneng means the  “place of light”, and that is what the innovative section, the Maboneng Precinct, has become amidst a concrete jungle of red brick construction and warehouse jumbles. The graffiti spilt sidewalks reach an urban vibe, the hippest urban regeneration spot – a cosmopolitan and arty joint. Joburg is re-identifying itself from the slaps of being a wasteland of lost wanderers.

 one of South Africa’s hippest urban enclaves and an incredible example of urban regeneration.” BBC TRAVEL

4. Klein Karoo – Cango Caves


Cango Caves

The Cango Caves are as popular as the ostriches in Oudtshoorn 30 km away. The caves cut from limestone are twenty million years old. The Caves are listed as one of the great natural wonders of the world. The hidden stalagmite chambers inhabited in the stone ages make up the largest cave system in Africa.

There are amazing subterranean caverns open to the public for an unforgettable adventure through tunnels and chambers. One highlight is ‘Cleopatras Needle’, a formation that is 9m high and over 150000 years old.

5. Golden Gate Highlands National Park


The name of the park. ‘Golden’ Gate  Highlands National Park is linked to the golden glittering sandstone cliffs. Located in the Northern Freee State 120km from Bloemfontein, the Maluti  Mountains nestle the park, home to various wildlife including wildebeest and zebra as well as rare birds like the bearded vulture and bald ibis. There is an abundance of activity from horseriding to nature trails and game viewing.

6. Midlands Meander


Midlands Meander

The most recognizable meander in Kwa Zulu Natal offers many discovery routes through the scenic Midlands Meander of Natal. An hour away from Durban, the Meander is 80kms of entertainment, arts and crafts. places to see, shops and over 160 places to sleep in. Encounter craftsmen from herb growers to cheese producers weavers and craft beer, artists, potters, carvers and much more.A haven for watersports enthusiasts for sailing, canoeing, boating and windsurfing near the Midmar Dam.

7. Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park


Kgagaladi Transfrontier Park

Africa’s first transborder conservation area between Botswana and South Africa. It is in the Northern Cape, 250km from Upington, the Kgalagadi Park is the joining of Botswana’s Gemsbok National Park and South Africa’s Kalahari GemsbokPark.

The combined protected area is thirty-eight thousand square kilometres.  In South Africa, part of nine thousand six hundred square kilometres covers the Southern part of the Kalahari desert which is uninhabited.  It offers great opportunities for game viewing of endangered and rare species.

8. Supertubes Jeffreys Bay


Supertubes Jefferys Bay Surfing

Jeffreys Bay, sixty-five kilometres from Port Elizabeth is a top surfing destination and has perfect and predictable right-hand Supertube point breaks

The high-speed waves reach 3 metres varying in length up to 300m. The best waves are in winter between May and the middle of September.

9. Moses Mabhida Stadium


Moses Mabhida Stadium

The Moses Mabhida stadium is popular for hosting international music concerts and sports.It is a tourist attraction with many other linked activities. It has a skycar taking visitors to the arch of the stadium, there is also the 500 step adventure walk up to the 106m arch to get the ultimate panoramic view of the sea and the city. Then there is the Big Rush, Big Swing, a stadium swing that plunges off the arch. There are restaurants and shopping boutiques on the property as well.

10. Sun City


Sun City

Sun City, an hour and a half away from Johannesburg is a popular complex for entertainment and family getaways. Hotels coupled with a popular golf course is a drawcard for tourists and locals. Many regularly flock here to enjoy the Valley of Waves, the casino for gambling and game viewing at the Pilanesberg National Park nearby. The Lost city Palace offers a five-star Africa holiday and has cabanas, game lodges and establishments for camping nearby.

 

 

Welcome to the tastes of Africa.  #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

WELCOME TO JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL

The Light Of Africa – Ready to Shine at the JUU Afrikan Festival,Tanzania2017

 

Travellers tell us about your experiences and recommendation

 

 

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

The Madagascar Fashion Style

Madagascar inhabitants are comprised of a combination of arrivals on the island almost 2000 years ago. They came from regions from all parts of the world like Arabia,India and the African continent.

These early settlers became the pioneers of Madagascar culture and society created an amalgamation of religion, culture and tradition.


Modern Madagascar is a perfect blend of traditionalism and modernism.


Fashion in Madagascar

Malagasies take pride in style and appearance and fashion design is in a sense actually indigenous to the island of Madagascar.

Madagascar clothing is unique with spectacular designs and decorated with colourful and bright scenes of daily life.  The colours are created from natural dyes like roots, berries and bark. There is a proverb at the bottom of a “Lamba”

Lambas are made with yarn spun by hand from natural silk. The dyed yarn is hand woven and the silk used is indigenous to Madagascar.


 

 

Accessories and clothing are palettes for creativity. Every village and town in Madagascar have people sporting the most exquisite traditional garments along with some imported style.

 

 

Malagasy indigenous fashions are created from Raffia fabric and Lamba garment and raffia fabric and weave. Extraordinary and versatile made in various brilliant patterns and colours.

The Lamba can be a shirt, a wrap or trouser alternative, used as a baby sling or made into a dress in a moment, This garment is fundamental for women and men as well

The Lamba is traditional dress in Northern Madagascar, “Lamba means cloth but refers to matching fabrics around the waist and around shoulders. Is some sections the Lamba is usually worn by men as ceremonies like offerings and burials. Old men in rural areas on Madagascar plateau areas wear them more often. Unlike men, many women wear  Lamba at all occasions.

Traditional Lamba is used to brighten contemporary jackets and pants and as accessories to western style clothing.

A creative outer garment replaces sweaters or jackets and there is a wide variety to creates unique personal style. Malagasy decorative fashion has developed into the Kreole fashion scene. The Malagasy mix of creative indigenous fabrics blending in with accessories from neighbouring African countries and Eurasia.

The distinctive African flair in a Eurasian flavour. Malagasy designs are cutting edge fashion styles with a blending combination of Asian garments and European hairstyles.

Common in Villages: Hat ‘Satroka penjy” and Long shirt Malabary

 

Design and textile artists from Madagascar make a bold presence on the global fashion scene.

Madagascar design and textile artists shine out in the world of fashion making a bold trailblazing presence on global fashion and entertainment stage.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

Timeless Train Journeys In Africa

Traveling is not about the destination. It is about the journey.  There are much quicker ways to get from one point to the next, yet train travels at a slow pace phase out the daily life hustle and bustle rush hour chaotic streams.

It is the ideal escape getaway, savoring moments on the pathway reaching the desired destination.

Trains are a differing dimension, gradual travel embracing experience realms of the beyond.

Cape Town to Dar Es Salaam with Rovos Rail

 

Rovos Rail

The epic journey takes a full fourteen days. The pride of Africa trip passes through Botswana, Zambia, Zimbabwe before reaching Tanzania!

 

 

 

 

A chance to experience diamond towns, historic villages, game reserves as well as Victoria Falls.

The high point is Great Rift Valley where there are dramatic viaducts, switchbacks, and tunnels. There is also a twenty-eight day Cape to Cairo journey every two years.

South Africa – Blue Train Journey

Blue Train-South Africa

The Blue train in South Africa is the most famous and has been dubbed as a  5-star hotel on wheels.

The meals, wine, accommodation with scenery along the 994-mile journey leaves from Pretoria taking off to the motherland of Cape Town takes about twenty-seven hours. This comes with stopovers.

There is also a trip from Pretoria to Durban at certain times during the year. This train journey with exclusive silk lines and bathroom gold fittings, cuisines by top chefs and nature scenes from the window is the ultimate experience in Africa

Namibia’s Desert Express

Desert Express

The Desert Express is a train for tourists between Windhoek and Swakopmund as well as Walvis Bay. There are excursions to the Etosha National Park. The elegant dining room is well equipped and conference facilities are on offer as well.The Desert Express in convenient modern and beats the desert heat.

Nairobi’s Jambo Kenya Deluxe

Jambo Kenya Deluxe

The Jambo Kenya Deluxe is a route between Nairobi and Mombasa. The overnight leisure trip from city to coast, savannah giraffes, zebras and ostriches are spotted while savouring gourmet cuisine and fine wines.  Comfortable sleeping berths epitomizes the deluxe of the journey

Tanzania to Zambia with TAZARA

TAZARA

The Tanzania-Zambia Railway (TAZARA):  Kilimanjaro and Mukuba express are passenger trains operating on TAZARA.  It runs for 1860km between Dar Es Salaam and Zambia
Running a few times each week, the journey takes approximately two days and nights. This is for intrepid travellers with little concern for luxury or punctuality. The spectacular scenery makes up for delays and service

 Tunisia’s ‘Lezade Rouge’

Lezarp Rouge

This antique  ‘Lezade Rouge’ tourist train,  runs daily into Atlas mountains foothills in the south of Tunisia.It passes through mining countries on the route from Metlaoui to Redeyef with periodic views. The journey is an hour long in each direction

South Africa’s Shosholoza Meyl

Shosholoza Meyl

An alternative for budget travellers Shosoloza offers intercity journeys between Johannesburg and each major city. The pleasant journey takes the exact same route as luxury trains and costs less than $100. The trains are not elegant but comfortable and save flight hassles between Johannesburg and Cape Town.

Zimbabwe Rail

Zimbabwe rail

Travel overnight between Victoria Falls and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe Rail features the classic 1950s-era British coaches with interiors of wooden panels. Elephants and baboons wander around in great sightings

 Mauritania’s Train du Desert

Mysterious Mauritiana unravels in a   2 story passenger carriage, Train du Desert. Guest spend time at excursion spots like  Chinguetti , the holy city the Azougui oasis, Ben Amira rock monolith.

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

Durban – The Zulu Kingdom in South Africa

  • Townships are the heartbeat of South Africa

The province of Kwa Zulu Natal provides opportunities to experience African culture in authentic first hand Zulu township and cultural tours.


Durban
  • Facts about township matters

The cultural rich etiquette of the soul of South Africa in townships can hardly be rivalled.

Township tours in Durban weave into the rhymes which were pathways for leaders like Nelson Mandela and Mahatma Gandhi. And an adventure to remember with an unforgettable ‘Shisanyama” (barbecue) mouth-watering feast.

 

 

  • Townships were initially established under apartheid rule.
  • Non-whites were forbidden to own or live in property in exclusively designated white areas and confined to underdeveloped settlements.

 

Townships are this day and age are predominantly black or non-white people. Since democracy, the settlements have been developed and upgraded. They are now kaleidoscope suburbs capturing the essence of resilient people. The social vibe and energy is the hub of creativity and small businesses.

Kwamashu

The oldest township in KZN is KwaMashu. Renowned for ethnic arts scene a tour in the mesmerizing location captures the essence of unique culture with a flair.

  • Experience life of KwaMashu residents and the neighbouring townships of Ntuzuma and Inanda. Get into the vibe and release into contemporary Kwaito style dance moves or varieties of hip hop and pantsula.
  • Get into the art vibe with drama performances and Mashkandi, the traditional music of the Zulu.
  • Experience herbalists and healers

Feel the spirit of true  ‘Ubuntu’, the spirit if humanity in Umlazi the second largest South African township

Umlazi epitomises  “African-ness” with its pulsating energy and vibrant culture.

Feel, taste and see  the spirit of Africa in true essence

In 1967, The National Party established it as a black township. In this day Umlazi has emerged into a buzzing township in South Africa filled with shebeens, “Shisanyama” as well as jazz venue