A Taste of Wisdom from Motherland Africa

Africa, the second largest landmass on Mother Earth has an abundance of ethnic and cultural groups. Food from the motherland of Africa is diverse and filled with delightful flavors. Unique recipes are rooted in traditions passed on from one generation to the next. And in turn, food was used for life lessons.

Words of Wisdom from the Motherland of Africa

Amharic Proverb:The same way porridge benefits those that heat and eat it, a child benefits all those that rear it.
A forest not only hides the enemies of man but has many healing medicines and food.
Kuria Proverb: One person is like thin porridge, two or more are an ugali lump.
Africa Proverb: If you count the food that you swallowed you will never be satisfied.
Egyptian Proverb: Women, wine, and food make happy hearts.
Bayome Proverb: Food that is in the mouth is not yet in the belly.
He that eats food of another will get his food eaten by others.
Food that is gained with corruption may taste sweet, but ends up as gravel in the mouth.
Xhosa Proverb: No partridge ever scratches the ground searching for food for another.
Ghanaian Proverb: A grasshopper close to his mother always eats the best food.
Malagasy Proverb: Do not add another mouthful before you have swallowed what is already in the mouth
 Zimbabwean Proverb: You cannot say to a child that is  child that you provided food the day before.
Kikuyu Proverb: Rich people east some bad food sometimes.
Congolese Proverb: A man that is impotent does not eat spiced food.
African Proverb: Always know what is being cooked in the kitchen or you could end up eating a food that is forbidden.
Ghanaian Proverb: A healthy person begging for food is an insult to any generous farmers.
Angolan Proverb: A single spoon of foos has more value when there is abundance of available food.
The mouth can be stupid forgetting who gave the food after it is eaten.
Acholi Proverb: A dog know places he throws his food.
If one eats alone you cannot discuss taste with others.
Ibo Proverb: Words can be sweet but do not replace food.
Yoruba Proverb: A man that has bread for eating cannot grasp the severety famine imposes.
He that does not clean his mouth before having breakfast will always complain of sour food.
Kikuyu Proverb: When food is cooked , there is no need to wait before eating.
Hausa Proverb: Man is just like pepper ,until you chew it, you never know how hot it is.
Igbo Proverb: Noo ne can get a food mouthful by picking others teeth.
Ewe proverb: It is not the fault of the cook when cassava is tastelss and hard.
Mauritius Proverb: If you watch your pot,the food will not burn.
 Malagasy Proverb: No matter how little food we have, even if just one locust, we share it.
Ethiopian Proverb:Eat when the food is ready, speak when time is right.
Zambian Proverb: When your lose luck,even the food that is cold burns.
Malagasy Proverb: Good words are hearty  food, bad words are  poisonous.

Feel, Taste and Hear Africa- #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

 

Delicious Island Delights-Marvelous Malagasy Meals


However little food we have, we'll share it even if it's only one locust. -- Madagascar Proverb

Daily life on the island of Madagascar is about food. It is the centre of conversation activity and rhythm.

Preparing food is a lengthy communal affair. Food in Madagascar is about sharing, and the Malagasy love to share. Cuisine from Madagascar is delicious but uncomplicated. Basic ingredients and equipment.  There is never  ‘nothing to eat ‘ as a meal can easily be rustled up from a few ingredients.

Nothing gets wasted. Food is valuable and appreciated and takes up seventy percent of household incomes and meals are prepared lovingly. Food is still in natural forms and cooked over open-wood charcoal.

Karibu  (Welcome) to  Malagasy style meals

Madagascar cuisine has an interesting blend of influences from the French, African,Indian and Arabic cultures. The staple is gigantic servings of rice. Typical flavors are generous ginger,garlic,onion vanilla,curry powder,lime juice and local vegetables.

 

  1. Ranovola

An acquired Malagasy taste, it is a type of tea made with burnt rice. The bottom of rice pots is mixed in water to create an interesting refreshment.

 

 

2. Voanjobory Sy Henakisoa

This traditional Madagascar dish was part of a feast during the Merina Royal festival. It is eaten at homes and restaurants all over the country.

 

 

The dish is a serving of Bambara groundnuts with chopped pork served with rice.

  1. Koba Akondro

This dessert is made from honey, banana, and peanuts and then wrapped in banana leaves and can be found anywhere as street food.

 

 

  1. Lasary

A common dish serves to complement main dishes. It is a mixture of cabbage, green beans, carrots and onions in a mild vinaigrette. Lasary refers to pickled lemon and mangoes in cities

 

  1. Ravimbomanga sy patsamena

 

Potato leaves are served in a stew with dried shrimp with tomato sauce and beef in a heap of rice

 

 

 

Foza sy hena-kisoa

This dish is a combination of crab, lobster and a stir-fry of pork with ginger, lime juice and fresh greens served the Malagasy way with a heap of rice.

 

Akoho sy voanio

A popular Malagasy meal found in most restaurants. It includes tomatoes, coconut milk, onion, chicken, ginger, garlic and some ground pepper.

 

 

Welcome to the taste of Madagascar #ExploreMotherland Africa

The food which is prepared has no master. - Malagasy Proverb

Tantalizing Tanzania Tastes

Many yearn to travel to Tanzania.There is way too much to do, climbing Kilimanjaro, kite surfing, quad exploring the vast national parks for wildlife, and landscape wonders.

And then there are the beaches. With all the action be sure that a healthy appetite will build up. A fine Tanzania cuisine and palate treat to savour on the ongoing adventure are sure to pass your way.

Here are a few ideas to splash into simmering into the adventure ahead when venturing to explore the heart of Motherland Africa in Tanzania or to re-experience treats after an escapade venture in Tanzania.

Let us start with a popular breakfast dish, Vitumbua. With a warm cup of ‘Chai’, you are sure to set off into an interesting day ahead with a start of taste bud sensations.


Vitumbua

1 cup – Rice Flour

4 tablespoons of plain flour

1 cup  Coconut milk

Teaspoon yeast

1 quarter cup sugar

1 teaspoon ground cardamom seeds

oil

Mix the rice flour, the plain flour, coconut milk and cardamom adding water slowly to thicken the paste. Cover upkeep in a warm area for about an hour until bubbles form on the top and the mixture has doubled in size.

Stir the batter and place in a Vitumbua pan

Give the batter a stirring placing a drop of oil in each section. Pour in a teaspoon of batter and flip until it browns on both sides.


Ndizi Kaanga (Fried Plantains)

8 Plantains

Lemon Juice

Butter

Nutmeg

Place the butter in a frying pan until melted. Cut the plantains into quarters. Dip in lemon juice and place on the heated pan until they are browned lightly.Sprinkle with some nutmeg

Wali wa Nazi (Rice cooked in Coconut Milk)

2 cups rice

1 and a half cup of coconut milk and 2 and a half cup water

1 teaspoon of salt

Add the coconut milk and water mixture into a saucepan with salt until it reaches boiling point, Add in the rice and lower the heat , cover and simmer for about half an hour. Serve alone or as an accompaniment

Chapatti

2 cups of flour

Warm water

Salt

1  onion chopped finely

Mix the flour salt and onion with hot water to make an elastic smooth dough and fold into a ball, Roll on a surface with flour and cook over medium heat in a frying pan and flip over once browned, The chapatti texture will be supple and soft once completed

Give your tastebuds a long deserved treat. Welcome #Explore Motherland Africa

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