#CreatepreneurAfrica ,South Africa’s Nena Tenacity, Content developer and Writer

 

 

Screenwriter,content developer and producer,Nena Tenacity has embraced a career in the creative sectors spanning over a decade and a half from humble early day beginnings to becoming 'The Çreator' _ a key content producer.

Her key interest is content and quality with information that expands knowledge and growth.

https://www.facebook.com/KirohoMtoto/

Initially, her inception into the film and television industry was on admin and crew tasks including the local ‘most watched’ South African soapieGenerations” , where she served as the director’s assistant

Thereafter several roles followed on various productions as a  production continuity supervisor.

Eventually, she became involved in research and proposal writing for television producers submitting educational programmes for broadcast content including ‘People of The South’,  a series that was hosted by Dali Tambo, a talk show celebrating key icons in South Africa.

Involved in multiple productions in key roles, eventually, her ongoing work reached fruition in 2008  when she produced a documentary “Dreaming the new” as well as a pilot on Madagascar on a completed 13-part docudrama series on tourism in the SADC region titled “Freeway Tours”.

Mam Dorothy Masuku, forever and always ,advisor, guide and role model

 

 

 

 

 

SEDIBA 2005 NFVF

Her first feature film “Stix and Stones”, a  feature social commentary film exploring the cycles of violence and poverty delving into her personal life realms was developed through National film and video foundation SEDIBA initiative, headed by the acclaimed screenwriting executive and mentor, Alby James. The rights were optioned by a South African production company  Ochre Media.

The rights to the film eventually reverted back to her when the production company that held rights changed management and operational structure.

She then ventured travelling with it to the Rotterdam film festival Babylon workshop and the film is currently on the market for possible production.

Her independent short film streams like ‘Struggles Continue’;  ‘Breaking the chains’ and ‘Strike a Dice’  received development funds during the initiation of the National Film and Video Foundation that was established in South Africa with a mission towards growth and development in the film and television industry.

This was her tool to launch her career forward in the development of several concepts including a series title ‘Let our voices be heard’films from women’s perspective.

She was on board of a development team for a series called ‘A true state of affairs that was a series reflecting migration issues in South Africa and raised xenophobia and other related issues.

Currently, she is on a mission to promote a new feature film  Úshujaa” : Mtoto wa kiroho kurudisha ulimwengu wetu 

#WARRIOR 
*spirit child taking back our earth, a language revolution film portraying

KISWAHILI is a liberating and uniting language across tribes and ethnicity. A Pan-African cause for our SOLIDARITY  to wipe away colonial supremacy of language   Sipho Mushwana

When a new spirit child is born with the ultimate Pan-African cause into an era of awakening, there is a calling to crumble the case and essence of the dominant based engraved world system...the English Language!

Key players on board include ‘Kiswahili Ambassadors’, Sipho Mushwana, Joseph Sarimbo as well as proudly Tanzania actor Kihaka GND as well as Neil Schell

Research and proposal preparation 

  • Eskia Mphalele Documentary
  • Dorothy Masuku Documentary
  • Women in Science Documentary

Her various role included a head researcher on ‘Wordart’ a series by Griffin Films celebrating South African writers and as a writer for Interrogation room a television series by Fremantle media.

Her other writing work included 15-minute films for Karlan Communications titled “Very Fast and not so furious “, a series reflecting film from the perspective of women

 

Producer

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica – #SHUJAA #WARRIOR #LANGUAGE REVOLUTIONIST Nena Tenacity

1.Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My passion…My passion is an outlet of expression, primarily through the tool of language and words

2. How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I can’t remember the exact age, but I always remember my key interest in writing and journaling continuously

3.What about your passion appeals to you the most?

I always thought of it as a regular everyday activity, like eating, drinking and sleeping. It is only in very recent years that I realised the power of words. A life skill of proportional weight

4.What drove you to make money from your passions?

When I learnt it was possible to get an income for spending your precious time in mind spaces that you prefer to.

5.When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

Tough one to answer! I guess payment was always there generally when people around you needed help with wording something or the other or preparing presentations, you would get rewarded in some way or the other. Actual money, my first memory is getting funded by the National Film and Video Foundation for developing my first short film ‘Let our voices be heard’, a short film speaking out against the exploitation and abuse of women.

6.What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

My self-will to battle against the odds and face trials and tribulations in the best manner I could. Other than those initiatives in the industry life the film foundation and many people including Alby James, Clarence Hamilton, Thandi Brewer, Julie Hall and a range of other key players in my personal and professional outlets

Akin Omotoso and Hakeem Kae Kazim, also played key role models in my stance to keep at it.

 7.What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I live by the motto of all and anything you want and desire is possible

8.What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Keep doubting. My precious time is not there to cater for counselling your ‘doubt’ condition

9.What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

All I can say is there will be falls, sometimes harder than others, but persist, keep the vision and endure being what you want to be. Nobody has to conform to fit within social expectations. Rise above and rise high.

 

 

South Africa’s Boipelo takes us on a Lyrical Journey with Sounds of Soul Emancipation

 

There is a calling to the world. Are you ready for a soul led journey of consciousness into a new awakening of spiritual and insightful realms? 

Then get ready to join in the journey. Boipelo is a spiritual practitioner,facilitator, artist and mechanical engineer,driven by a vision to lead a pathway if ultimate freedom and abundance. A vision possible with positive change through the art of self-transformation

 

“The beauty of life and the endless ways and possibilities in which we can co-create along with it motivate me every day” ______Boipelo

 

“Boipelo Matlhare, a spiritual practitioner who channels energies from all elements into healing paths and self-produces monthly moonsongs in Setswana as an expression of life's mystic revelations is a gold gem of Afrika.”_________                             Baba Buntu

Her work is an enlightening foundation of the treasured continent of Africa with its cosmology, rooted in indigenous knowledge systems. Boipelo’s expression of poetry and music, music design as well as Kemetic yoga,  is a quest to promote well being and healing

Her growth is rooted in an awakened ability to listen and receive accurate guidance, tap into an ‘indwelling divine healing wisdom’….connecting and uniting all of us.

In 2010  a special invitation arrived for her performance at Sudan 365,  a marked event of Global beat for Peace in Sudan campaign that was held in Johannesburg in conjunction with  Human Rights Institute of South Africa .

Ba Ra Song: Songs For Crystal Clarity

Moonsongs, Vol. 1: Songs for Seeing Your Dreams Through

 

Infectious callings continued to roll in and she blessed many performance platforms thereafter.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Go Play the World Sessions, Dubai (2014 – 2019)
  • World Cultural Diversity Festival, Johannesburg (2014)
  • Ratha Yatra Festival, Pretoria (2012 – 2013)
    With City  of Tshwane civil society environmental activist group
  • My Planet My Choice – Courageous Conversations, Johannesburg (2013)
  • My Planet My Choice – COP17 Conference, Durban (2012)
  • 1st Music and Yoga Therapy class @ the Skills Village Mandela Day adopt a school celebration (2013)
  • Free Minds Festival, Kimberley (2010 – 2011)
  • Sudan 365 – Global beat for peace in Sudan campaign (2010)
  • Fashionable Hip Hop Sessions, Pretoria (2009)

Her  treasured double debut music project that was innovatively self-released in September 2018 includes  Moonsongs Volume1: Songs for seeing your dreams through and  Ba Ra Song: Songs for crystal clarity 

 

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica  BOIPELO leading Africa on a ‘MOONSONG’ escapade into new beginnings

 

Tell us what drives you? 

I’m driven by the knowing that the ability to experience great freedom, abundance and joy is possible for not some but all of us.

What is your true passion in life?

My true passion is song-writing for self-transformation and positive change.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was inspired by a friend, a poet I met when I was 12 years old. I’d written poems in primary school before that I’d then not yet connected to on an emotional level. I went through a lot of trauma towards the end of primary school and early parts of high school. Writing became a way of releasing pent up heavy emotions and transforming them into something that brought me joy. I also back then struggled to relate to lyrics with negative messaging and would often find myself confused as to why so many artists weren’t using music to it’s full potential

What about your passion appeals to you?

The ability that we have to tap into an indwelling divine wisdom that heals, guides and connects us all appeals the most to me.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

Art and Music have always been more than a passion for me and I have because of this always been inclined to finding ways and channels of how one can make money doing them. Attending music business events and understanding the different revenue channels available for artists have also been a strong source of motivation knowing that the world is changing for the better and that there will always be new ways and possibilities to innovate and create wealth as a creative.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

In 2010 when I was invited by the Human Rights Institute of South Africa to play at the Sudan 365: Day of Global Beat for Peace. This was an event held in 15 countries urging world leaders to take urgent diplomatic steps to prevent a return to conflict in Sudan, leading up to the 2011 referendum.

 

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I’ve given up many times. I now see this as a time to check out in order to re-group. What’s motivated me to keep going is my need to heal, and the desire to see my creations as a tangible legacy for future generations to use and have access to rather than ideas in my mind or in my songbooks.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 

The beauty of life, nature and the endless ways and possibilities in which we can co-create along with this greatness motivate me to do better each day.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 

Not understanding someone’s point of view does not deem it invalid. Staying curious and inquisitive rather than judgmental makes our experiences so much more richer.

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

Dedicate yourself to finding who you are and what differentiates you. Something about you that no-one in the world could imitate even if they tried to. Once you’re there commit to that vision.

 

Website                https://www.boipelomusic.com/  

Learn Kiswahili #THE LANGUAGE REVOLUTION with Joseph Sarimbo – Kiswahili Noun Class Lesson Two

Greetings my fellow Kiswahili learners

.

Karibu…….Welcome again. Let us quickly revise Greetings, as we greet each other and meet again! Our  #LanguageRevolution. Journey of the millineum!

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/the-languagerevolution-learn-kiswahili-with-joseph-sarimbo-1/

Our  second Kiswahili lesson plan   touches on grammar and noun classes, a crucial component in Kiswahili #THELANGUAGEREVOLUTION…..let us delve my fellow warriors #SHUJAA

Learn Kiswahili #THELANGUAGEREVOLUTION… at your doorstep with Joseph Sarimbo…! Lesson One

COMMAND SIMPLE IMPERATIVE (command or an instruction, telling someone what to do or influencing behaviour). To make command simple imperative you will need to drop infinitive KU for the non-monosyllabic verb and keep infinitive KU for the monosyllabic verb.

Let us view some examples to get the gist of it……….

Kupika: To cook               Pika chakula                 Cook food

Kusoma: To read             Soma kitabu                  Read a book.

Kuimba: To sing              Imba wimbo                  Sing a song.

Kuchukua : To take         Chukua kitabu               Take a book

Kula :To eat                     Kula chakula                    Eat food

Kunywa: To drink           Kunywa chai                   Drink tea.

 

VERB “TO BE” IN PRESENT

“To be” is expressed with monosyllabic KUWA ( to be) in other tenses, But in present is expressed with:

Positive: NI
Negative: SI

Mti ni mrefu            The tree is tall.
Mti si mrefu tree     The tree is not tall.
Mtoto ni mdogo       The child is small.
Mtoto si mdogo        The child is not small.
Kitabu ni kizuri        The book is good
Kitabu si kizuri         The book is not good

 

The core of sentence construction all essentially relates to the noun class. For example in the case of possessive pronouns, it takes a subject prefix depending on the noun class. In our agreement charts, we have a noun prefix and a subject prefix. Noun prefix are used with adjectives
Subject prefixes are used with possessive pronouns and also during verb constructions

There are 15 NOUN CLASSES in Kiswahili
They are grouped into characteristics and vowel harmony

Every noun class has both singular and plural. Class one and two are animate classes. All the animate( living things)take prefixes from these classes.

This noun class consist of the following nouns

  • People M- singular and WA- plural
    People nouns

Class 1: Animate which start with M or M(W)

Class 2: Animate which start with WA.

(1&2) are singular & plural.

Example:

mtoto/watoto [child/children]
mgeni/wageni [visitor/visitors]
mfaransa/wafaransa [French person/French people]
mjomba/wajomba [uncle/uncles]
mke/wake [wife/wives]
mkulima/wakulima [farmer/farmers]
mpishi/wapishi [cook/cooks]
msichana/wasichana [girl/girls]
mtu/watu [person/people]
mume/waume [husband/husbands]
mvulana/wavulana [boy/boys]
mzee/wazee [elder/elders]
mzungu/wazungu [white man/woman/white men/women]
mjerumani/wajerumani [German person/German people]
mwanamume/wanaume [man/men]
mwanamke/wanawake [woman/women]
mwalimu/walimu [teacher/teachers]
mwanafunzi/wanafunzi [student/students]
mwafrika/waafrika [African person/African people]

When forming sentences and using a verb, it will be a,  in singular if you use third person singular and –wa , in plural

But when you use relative class for class 9/10 with possessive you will use the prefix of the same classes.

Examples

Rafiki yangu alikuja nyumbani. [My friend came home.]
Rafiki zangu walikuja nyumbani. [ My Friends came home.]
Mama yangu anapika kuku. [My mother is cooking chicken.]
Mama wanapika kuku. [Mothers are cooking chicken.]

Class 3/4 are for nouns (things) which start with M and plural start MI

This noun class has the following nouns:

1. majina ya miti [names of trees]
2. majina ya mimea [names of plants]
3. sehemu za mwili [body parts]

nouns that take M- in singular and MI- in plural, radicals that start with a vowel:
nouns that take MW- in singular and MI- in plural
particular cases: singular prefix MU-

Majina ya miti _Names of trees.

mti/miti [tree/trees]
mnazi/minazi [coconut tree/coconut trees]
mchungwa/michungwa [orange tree/orange trees]
mwembe/miembe [mango tree/mango trees]
mtofaa/mitofaa [apple tree/apple trees]
mpapai/mipapai [papaya tree/papaya trees]
mndimu/mindimu [lime tree/lime trees]
mpera/mipera [guava tree/guava trees]
mgomba/migomba [banana tree/banana trees]

Sehemu za mwili _Body parts

mdomo/midomo [mouth/mouths]
mkono/mikono [hand/hands]
mguu/miguu [leg/legs]
mfupa/mifupa [bone/bones]
mgongo/migongo [back/backs]
moyo/mioyo [heart/hearts]
mwili/miili [body/bodies

Nouns that take M- in singular and MI- in plural

mfano/mifano [example/examples]
mji/miji [city/cities]
mkoba/mikoba [bag/bags]
mfuko/mifuko [bag/bags]
mlango/milango [door/doors]
mtihani/mitihani [exam/exams]/tests]
mlima/milima [mountain/mountains]
mpira/mipira [ball/balls]
mkate/mikate [bread/breads]
mto/mito [river/rivers]
mungu/miungu [god/gods]
mchezo/michezo [game/games]
moto/mioto [fire/fires]
msikiti/misikiti [mosque/mosques]
msitu/misitu [forest/forests]
mswaki/miswaki [toothbrush/toothbrushes]
mto/mito [river/rivers, pillow/pillows]

Nouns that take MW- in singular and MI- in plural

mwaka/miaka [year/years]
mwavuli/miavuli [umbrella/umbrellas]
mwezi/miezi [month/months]
mwiba/miiba [thorn/thorns]
mwisho/miisho [end/ ends]

Particular cases: singular prefix

MU-
muhindi/mihindi [corn]

muhogo/mihogo [cassava/cassavas]
muwa/miwa [sugarcane]
1. Mti ulianguka. [The tree fell.]
Miti ilianguka. [The trees fell.]
2. Mkono unauma. [The hand hurts.]
Mikono inauma. [The hands hurt.]
3. Mkoba umeoshwa. [The bag has been washed.]
Mikoba imeoshwa. [The bags have been washed.]

Class 5/6

This is for nouns which plural start with MA. Singular can start with any Noun but plural must start with MA.Nouns in this class can start with any letter in their singular form but their plural forms must take MA-.
This noun class has the following nouns:

A). manufactured products, natural or built places, abstract or concrete
concepts
B). sehemu za mwili [parts of the body]
C). matunda na vitu vya kawaida [fruits and natural objects]
D). majina ya vitu ambavyo havihesabiki [These nouns exist only in the plural
form and are things which cannot be counted. They take MA- in both
singular and plural form]
E) majina ya watu few names of people.

A). Manufactured products, natural or built places,
abstract or concrete concepts

1. Manufactured products:

blanketi/mablanketi [blanket/blankets]
dirisha/madirisha [window/windows]
gari/magari [car/cars]
gazeti/magazeti [newspaper/newspapers]
godoro/magodoro [mattress/mattresses]
sanduku/masanduku [box/boxes]
jiko/meko/majiko [gas cooker/gas cookers]

2. Natural or Built places:

daraja/madaraja [bridge/bridges]
duka/maduka [shop/shops]
shamba/mashamba [farm/farms]
soko/masoko [market/markets]
ziwa/maziwa [lake/lakes]
jimbo/majimbo [state/states]

3. Abstract or Concrete concepts:

jina/majina [name/names]
kosa/makosa [mistake/mistakes]
neno/maneno [word/words]
jambo/mambo [issue/issues]
jiwe/mawe [stone/stones]
somo/masomo [subject/subjects; lesson/lessons]
wazo/mawazo [thought/thoughts]
jibu/majibu
swali/maswali
jukumu/majukumu [responsibility/responsibilities]
juma/majuma [week/weeks

B). Sehemu za mwili [parts of the body]

jicho/macho [eye/eyes]
jino/meno [tooth/teeth]
bega/mabega [shoulder/shoulders]
goti/magoti [knee/knees]
sikio/masikio [ear/ears]
tumbo/matumbo [stomach/bowels]
paja/mapaja [thigh/thighs]

C). Matunda na vitu vya kawaida  [fruits and natural objects]

1.Fruits:

chungwa/machungwa [orange/oranges]
embe/maembe [mango/mangoes]
limau/malimau [lemon/lemons]
nanasi/mananasi [pineapple/pineapples]
papai/mapapai [pawpaw/pawpaws]
dafu/madafu [coconut/coconuts (with milk)]
tofaa/matofaa [apple/apples]

2. Natural Objects:

jani/majani [leaf/leaves]
yai/mayai [egg/eggs]
rinda/marinda [dress/dresses]

3. Majina ya vitu ambavyo havihesabiki [nouns of things that cannot be counted, whichexist only in the plural form

maji [water]
mafuta [oil]
mali [wealth]
maafa [misfortune]

Zingatia [Note]

When using a verb, this noun class uses LI- in singular and YA- in
plural for sentence formation.

Sentence Formation

Mifano:Example

1. Chungwa limenunuliwa. [The orange has been bought.]
Machungwa yamenunuliwa. [The oranges have been bought.]
2. Gari limefika. [The car has arrived.]
Magari yamefika. [The cars have arrived.]
3. Jicho linauma. [The eye hurts.]
Macho yanauma. [The eyes hurt.]
4. Maji yamemwagika. [The water has been poured.]

Class 7/8
Class 7 & 8 is for nouns which start with KI or CH / VI or VY

This noun class has the following nouns:
A). nouns that take KI- in singular and VI- in plural
B). nouns that take CH- in singular and VY- in plural
C). body parts [sehemu za mwili]
D). names of languages [majina ya lugha]
E) some few animates

A). Nouns that take KI- in singular and VI- in plural
kiti/viti [chair/chairs]

kitabu/vitabu [book/books]
kiatu/viatu [shoe/shoes]
kisu/visu [knife/knives]
kikombe/vikombe [cup/cups]
kilima/vilima [hill/hills]
kisiwa/visiwa [island/islands]
kiazi/viazi [potato/potatoes]
kitunguu/vitunguu [onion/onions]
kitu/vitu [thing/things]
kitanda/vitanda [bed/beds]
kioo/vioo [mirror/mirrors]
kiberiti/viberiti [match/matches]

B). Nouns that take CH- in singular and VY- in plural

chuo/vyuo [school/schools; college/colleges]
choo/vyoo [restroom/restrooms]
chakula/vyakula [food/foods]
chumba/vyumba [room/rooms]
cheti/vyeti [certificate/certificates]
chama/vyama [party/parties; association/associations]
chuma/vyuma [iron/irons]
chombo/vyombo [container/containers; utensil/utensils]
cheo/vyeo [rank/ranks]

C). Body Parts [sehemu za mwili]

kichwa/vichwa [head/heads]
kiuno/viuno [waist/waists]
kifua/vifua [chest/chests]
kidole/vidole [finger/fingers]

D). Names of Languages [majina ya lugha]

Kiarabu [Arabic]
Kifaransa [French]
Kiingereza [English]
Kichina [Chinese]
Kijapani [Japanese]
Kichwa kinauma. [The head is hurting.]
Vichwa vinauma. [The heads are hurting.]
2. Kiti kilivunjwa na mtoto. [The chair was broken by a child]
Viti vilivunjwa. [The chairs were broken.]
3. Chuo kimefungwa. [The college has been closed.]
Vyuo vimefungwa. [The college have been closed.]
4. Chakula kitapikwa. [The food will be cooked.]
Vyakula vitapikwa. [The foods will be cooked.]

Class 9/10  : These is nouns which singular and plural are the same.

 

Example:
Habari/habari. News

barua/barua [letter/letters]
chupa/chupa [bottle/bottles]
dawa/dawa [drug/drugs; medicine/medicines]
kalamu/kalamu [pen/pens]
karatasi/karatasi [paper/papers]
ngoma/ngoma [drum/drums]
sabuni/sabuni [soap/soaps]
sahani/sahani [plate/plates]
sufuria/sufuria [pan/pans]
suruali/suruali [trouser/trousers]
chaki/chaki [chalk/chalk]
dola/dola [dollar/dollars]
kompyuta/kompyuta [computer/computers]
nguo/nguo [cloth/cloths]
soksi/soksi [sock/socks]
shilingi/shilingi [shilling/shillings]
meza/meza [table/tables]
taa/taa [light/lights]
senti/senti [cent/cents]
nyumba/nyumba [house/houses]

Nature:

ardhi/ardhi [earth; ground]
bahari/bahari [sea]
baridi/baridi [cold]
barafu/barafu [ice]
hewa/hewa [air; atmosphere]
nuru/nuru [light]
mvua/mvua [rain]
njia/njia [way]
bandari/bandari [harbor]
barabara/barabara [road]
nchi/nchi [country]

Abstract concepts:

ajali/ajali [accident/accidents]
bahati/bahati [luck/lucks]
furaha/furaha [joy/joys]
hasara/hasara [loss/losses]
hatari/hatari [danger/dangers]
huzuni/huzuni [sadness/sadnesses]
nguvu/nguvu [strength/strengths]
shida/shida [problem/problems]
thamani/thamani [value/values]
dakika/dakika [minute/minutes]
sifa/sifa [praise/praises; reputation/reputations]
ndoto/ndoto [dream/dreams]
shughuli/shughuli [business/businesses]

B). Foods, fruits, and vegetables

chai/chai [tea/teas]
chumvi/chumvi [salt/salts]
kahawa/kahawa [coffee/coffees]
mboga/mboga [vegetable/vegetables]
nazi/nazi [coconut/coconuts]
ndizi/ndizi [banana/bananas]
nyama/nyama [meat/meats]
pilipili/pilipili [pepper/[peppers]
siagi/siagi [butter; margarine]
sukari/sukari [sugar/sugars]
njugu/njugu [groundnut/groundnuts]

Zingatia [Note]

mbwa/mbwa [dog/dogs]
paka/paka [cat/cats]
ng’ombe/ng’ombe [cow/cows]
simba/simba [lion/lions]
ndovu/ndovu [elephant/elephants]
Ndege/ndege [birds]
kuku/kuku [hen/hens]
kasuku/kasuku [parrot/parrots]
tai/tai [eagle/eagles]
bata mzinga/bata mzinga turkey/turkeys]

 

Wadudu [insects]
nyuki/nyuki [bee/bees]
mbu/mbu [mosquito/mosquitoes]
nzi/nzi [fly/flies]
When using a verb, this noun class uses I- in singular and ZI- in plural
for sentence formation.

Sentence Formation

Mifano:
1. Kalamu imeanguka. [The pen has fallen.]
Kalamu zimeanguka. [The pens have fallen.]
2. Njia imefungwa. [The way has been closed.]

Njia zimefungwa. [The ways have been closed.]

Class 9/10 is a relative class. All relative nouns belong to class 9/10.

Examples

baba/baba [father/fathers]
babu/babu [grandfather/grandfathers]
dada/dada [sister/sisters]
kaka/kaka [brother/brothers]
mama/mama [mother/mothers]
Bibi/bibi [grandmother/grandmothers]
rafiki/rafiki [friend/friends]
shangazi/shangazi [aunt/aunts]

Class 11
This class noun can start with U or WA
This class is a singular class. If the noun need plural will borrow class 10 or class 6

U – U [U – ZI]
U – U [U – U]

This noun class has the following nouns:
A). concrete nouns with various plurals
B). uncountable nouns, with no plural form
C). nouns that are mostly formed from adjectives, nominals, or verbal roots
D). names of countries

A). Concrete nouns with various plurals
U – NY:

uso/nyuso [face/faces]
uzi/nyuzi [thread/threads]
ua/nyua [courtyard/courtyards]
ufa/nyufa [crack/cracks]
uma/nyuma [fork/forks]

U – ND:

ulimi/ndimi [tongue/tongues]
udevu/ndevu [beard/beards]

U – MB:

ubao/mbao [board/boards]
ubavu/mbavu [rib/ribs]
ubawa/mbawa [wing/wings]

U – Ø:

unywele/nywele [one hair/hair]
ufunguo/funguo [key/keys]
ukuta/kuta [wall/walls]
upande/pande [side/sides]
uvumbi/vumbi [grain of dust/dust]
upanga/panga [machete/machetes]
upepo/pepo [wind/winds]

W – NY:

wakati/nyakati [time/times]
wembe/nyembe [razor blade/razor blades]
wimbo/nyimbo [song/songs]

B). Uncountable nouns, with no plural form .Nouns in this category doesn’t have plural sentence formation when using a verb(s).

udongo [soil; ground]
ugali [corn paste]
uji [porridge]
ulimwengu [world]
umeme [electricity]
umri [age]
unga [flour]
usingizi [sleep]
uwongo [a lie]

C). Nouns that are mostly formed from adjectives, nominals, or verbal roots
Nouns in this category doesn’t have plural when using a
verb(s). Nominal roots: NOUN – NOUN

jamaa – ujamaa [group of people – community]
kijana – ujana [young person – young age]
mzee – uzee [old person – old age]
maskini – umaskini [poor person – poverty]
mchawi – uchawi [witch – witchcraft]
mfalme – ufalme [king – kingdom]
mtoto – utoto [child – childhood]
Verbal roots: VERB – NOUN
kuiba – uwizi [to steal – theft]
kukosa – ukosefu [to miss – deficiency]
kupenda – upendo [to love – love]
kuweza – uwezo [to be able – capacity]
kusahau – usahaulifu [to forget – forgetfulness]

D). Names of countries

Ufaransa [France]
Uganda [Uganda]
Uingereza [England]
Ujerumani [Germany]
Ureno [Portugal]
Urusi [Russia]

Zingatia [Note]

When using a verb, this noun class uses U- in singular and ZI or YA in plural depending in class
for sentence formation. However, uncountable nouns and nouns that are
formed from adjectival, nominal, or verbal roots only use U-.

Sentence Formation

Mifano:
1. Ulimi unauma. [The tongue hurts.]
Ndimi zinauma. [The tongues hurt.]
2. Ufunguo umepotea. [The key has been lost.]
Funguo zimepotea. [The keys have been lost.]
3. Ubavu umevunjika. [The rib has broken.]
Mbavu zimevunjika. [The ribs have broken.]
4. Ugali umepikwa. [The cornmeal has been cooked.]
5. Upendo wao umesifika. [Their love has been praised.]

Class 15
This class is for all verbs change to become a noun.

Example
Kusoma, kuimba ,kucheza.

Class 16,17,18 we call them location class

Noun class Subject prefix
1. Mtoto
2.watoto
3.mkate U
4.mikate i
5.Tunda li
6. Matunda ya
7. Kitabu ki
8.vitabu vi
9.habari i
10. Habari zi
11. Usiku u
15. Kusoma ku
16. Mahali pa
17. Mjini ku
18.mwilini M(u)
Mtoto wangu My child
Watoto wangu My children
Mtoto wako Your child
Kitabu chake His/Her book
Usiku wetu Our night
Mkate wenu Your bread
Maisha yao Their life

 

Learn Kiswahili Here!

Learn Kiswahili #THELANGUAGEREVOLUTION… at your doorstep with Joseph Sarimbo…! Lesson One

 

We begin the Learn Kiswahili journey as a standard course, this includes exchanging the appropriate greetings and talking about daily activities and progress to an intermediate level with exercises and practical application.

 

LESSON ONE :   MAAMKIZI/ GREETINGS

 

Welcome, take this journey with me as we delve into the new KISWAHILI millenium .....#THE LANGUAGEREVOLUTION.....COMING SOON! 

We begin with Greetings
No Kiswahili speaker will participate in any conversation without greetings......Lets Get Started 

#CreatePreneurAfrica from the foothills of Kilimanjaro- Joseph Adelard Sarimbo

In Kiswahili we have two types of Greetings:

1: General Greetings.
2: Specific Greetings.

1: GENERAL GREETINGS

This is types of greetings which you can use at any time of the day, be it  morning, afternoon, evening or night.

a)  Scene One : Let’s launch into greetings between two people ( Joni and Maria), that meet each other

Joni:      Habari za leo?                                How are you today?

An alternative is Habari Gani?               How are things?

Maria:   Nzuri sana , hujambo?             Very Good , how are  you?
Joni:      Sijambo  , Asante                           I am fine, thanks

Maria : Haya, Kwa heri                                 Ok, Goodbye

Joni : Asante, Kwa heri                                    Thanks , Goodbye!

Vocabulary

Habari                               news
- zuri                               good
Hujambo                             How are you?
Sijambo                             I am fine
Asante                             Thank you
Jambo                              Matter /problem

Scene Two : Baraka meets Maria

Baraka:  Habari gani ndugu?                          How are you friend.
Maria:     Nzuri, hujambo?                          Am good, how are you?
Baraka:    Sijambo                                             I am fine

Vocabulary:

Ndugu :   relative, friend, comrade

 

More Greetings………….

Habari za saa hizi?            How are  you this time?

Nzuri , hujambo?                Good , how are you?
Sijambo                                  I  am fine.

Salama?                               Are you fine?

Salama                                  Fine

Mzima?                                Mzima

U hali gani?                         How are you? Whats your condition

Umelalaje?                           How have you slept

Umeamkaje?                         How did you wake up?

Mzima /Salama/Safi

 

Youth Greetings

Mambo vipi?                            How are you?
Poa                                             cool/ fine

Greetings from young to elders

This greeting is used from young person to adult as respect.

Shikamoo                   I respect you
Marahaba                   I accept your respect.

You can mention the title of a person.  For example, Shikamoo mama, Shikamoo baba, Shikamoo kaka etc

Part One of Greeting! Taking it step by step..Part Two of Kiswahili greetingS

SPECIFIC GREETINGS

This is types of Greetings which are used at a specific time. Example: Asubuhi, Mchana, Jioni or Usiku

Morning Greetings - 
Joni: Habari za asubuhi?               How are you this morning?
Maria: Nzuri, hujambo?              Am good , how are you?
Joni: sijambo sana         Am very fine.
Asubuhi -               Morning
Afternoon greetings:

Joni: Habari za mchana?                    How are  you this afternoon? 
    Maria: Nzuri sana. Hujambo?            I am very fine. How are  you?
Joni: Sijambo dada            Am fine sister.
Evening Greetings
Maria: habari za jioni?                   How are  you this evening? 
Joni: nzuri dada, hujambo?              Am fine sister, hows you?
Maria: Sijambo kabisa             I am absolutely fine
                            Night Greetings

Maria:Habari za usiku ndugu?    How are you this night friend? 
Joni: nzuri, hujambo?           Am good , How are you?
Maria : sijambo rafiki          I am good friend.
Vocabulary

Jioni :  Evening
Usiku:   Night
Rafiki : Friend

 

Other Greetings
Umeshindaje?                How are you conquer your day

Salama                                        Well/good

Uko poa?                          Are you fine?
Nipo poa                                                  I am fine

 

KUJITAMBULISHA/ SELF INTRODUCTION



Before we go to self introduction lets see personal pronouns in Swahili:
we have six personal pronouns in Swahili.


MIMI I, ME
WEWE YOU
YEYE HE/SHE
SISI WE/US
NINYI YOU (Plr)
WAO THEY/THEM
                             Subject prefix
MIMI NI
WEWE U
YEYE A
SISI TU
NINYI M(U)
WAO WA
Amani:  Jina langu ni Amani                My name is Amani.
Na wewe je?                                And what about you?
Joseph: Jina langu ni Joseph               My name is Joseph.
Amani: Umetoka nchi gani?                  Which country are you from?
Joseph:   Nimetoka marekani                I am from USA.
Amani: Nimefurahi kukutana na wewe         I am happy to meet you.
Joseph: asante ndugu                       Thank you friend
Vocabulary:

Jina       Name
-angu        my
Kutoka       To come out of
Nchi         Country
Gani?        What kind/ which
Kufurahi     to glad / to be happy
Kukutana     to meet
Kuitwa      to be called
Nani          who
-ako          your

 

Joseph:  Naitwa Joseph           I am called Joseph.
Wewe waitwa nani?                Who are you called? (Whats your name?)


Amani: Naitwa Amani             I am called Amani.
Joseph: Umetoka nchi gani?      Which country are you from? 


Amani: Nimetoka Uingereza        I am from England.
Na wewe je?                      What about you?
Joseph:Nimetoka Tanzania         I  am from Tanzania.

 
Jina lako nani?           Whats your name?
Jina langu ni Amani       My name is Amani.
Na wewe je?              What about you?
Jina langu ni Joseph     My name is Joseph

Join Us as we continue to continue in #THELANGUAGE REVOLUTION

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/createprenuerafrica-proudly-tanzanian-actor-kihaka-gnd/

#CreatePreneur Africa Dobijoki Ema, on a mission to ignite Africa centered education, A MUST-HAVE FOR AFRICA RISING

 

The journey of her soul sparked off at early stages at the tender age of two as she joined her mother and a group of South Sudanese women in Cairo, Egypt in 1994, protesting for the rights of education for South Sudanese children.

He life purpose with a focus on Africa centered education as a powerful decolonization tool for healing Africa ignited as she graduated with a Masters in Education (MA in Education: Critical Policy, Equity, and Leadership Studies), triumphing over life adversities in the process.

I believe that through African-Centred education for Black and African children, our communities will truly learn and believe in their value on this planet and lead toward successes.  _ Dobijoki Ema @Dobijoki

 

I discovered that many of the children carried the weight of self hate; they didn’t like their skin color, their culture was not white enough, and they did not believe they could be successful     _ Dobijoki Ema @Dobijoki

Meet  #CreatepreneurAfrica,  The Spirit of Africa Rising –  Dobijoki Ema

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My true passion is to serve people……my people. Ever since I was a young girl I aspired to be a servant of the world and to make sure all of my African brothers and sisters, in particular, are able to live the most powerful and fruitful life, or as close as possible.

I believe that through African-Centred education for Black and African children, our communities will truly learn and believe in their value on this planet and lead toward successes.

What drives me is the Most High, I personally believe I was awarded a gift, which is to learn, fight, strive and carry my community. Seeing my people suffer drives me to carry out my duty in this mystical universe.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was two years old when I attended my first protest for peace and education. My family is from South Sudan but fled to Egypt due to the civil war.
In 1994 at the age of two, my mother and a number of other South Sudanese women went to protest outside of the UNHCR headquarters in Cairo, Egypt for the right to education, as South Sudanese children did not have access to education.
This was my first protest, it is what introduced me to the world of service and social justice. I did not find my passion, it found me.

 

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me most about serving others is that it brings a sense of hope and togetherness to the lives of those that need it most. I ran sex-disaggregated alternative African-Centred programming in South Africa with students from grades 5-7.

The reason I began these programmes at the school I was working out of is because I discovered that many of the children carried the weight of self-hate; they didn’t like their skin color, their culture was not white enough, and they did not believe they could be successful.
The curriculum wasn’t successfully teaching the children about themselves and their culture in a way that empowers them, so I took it upon myself to show them how powerful their indigeneity was. Knowing that the students left the programme with at least one reason to love their Africanness was all I could ask for.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

My drive is not the money, it is the work for the people – I try and make money from other sources while using my drive to love to serve people and my passion for people.

 

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

My first job at the age of 13 was a Youth Service Worker – I worked in my priority neighborhood supporting immigrant and refugee youth in being agents of change. Although I was also one of these youth, having a leadership platform helped me gain more confidence in my abilities to lead and serve.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Knowing that every person I work with will be reminded of their genuine capabilities and worthiness has pushed me and kept me going, but I also believe that my spiritual connectedness to the Most High has empowered me to never give up on serving my people.

As long as there is racism and societal disadvantages faced by people of color, there will be my service.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Success for me is between my actions and my heart. My heart speaks and my actions attempt to follow through with its desires. As long as I am able to align the two I will continue to be successful.

My motivation is the community and the power of people. I have a family that is very close, we serve for one another naturally and have learned the beauty of compassion through our connectedness. My family life lessons along with my personal expectations of love, freedom, and peace motivate me to be more successful in my work.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I love you and I wish you success.

 

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

When I can’t find the right opportunity in the workforce, I create my own. Whenever I find someone who can be of guidance and mentorship, I learn about them and contact them for support. Anything you want to create or be a part of is possible with timing, work, and dedication.

#CreatePreneurAfrica from the foothills of Kilimanjaro- Joseph Adelard Sarimbo

 

His soul voice streams in a flow of world explorers navigating to get seeded with the roots of Kiswahili. Joseph Adelard Sarimbo's  daily lessons are an invigorating gist of Africa's Culture at the helm of life.

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/createprenuerafrica-proudly-tanzanian-actor-kihaka-gnd/

He is currently part of a feature film team as a key contributor to “Shujaa, Kiroho Mtoto”, an upcoming feature film set to make the mark of the millineum!

 

 

 

Many missionaries, travelers and workers from all over the world with life driven purposes in East Africa, begin there journey in Kiswahili tunes at the ELCT language school in Morogoro where he teaches.

The liberating  language of unity for the continent of Africa is Kiswahili                                Joseph Adelard Sarimbo

He is also involved in community work and helps the farmers and livestock keepers always providing advice and ideas with the aim of elevating them from local farming methods towards implementing modern ‘agribusiness’ methodologies.

In the near future, he aims to open his own Kiswahili language and cultural learning center.

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica- Joseph Sarimbo Soothsayer of the KiSwahili Linguist Imperliasm movement

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

My passion is world unity. My passion is the dimension of interconnection. I have a passion for people.  What drives me?

I am driven by my love of my language (Kiswahili) because I want to spread the Kiswahili language of unity to every corner of the world!

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I was sixteen years old when envisioned my calling. My life purpose…. I actively participated in community activities,  I was not sure of the pathway to follow. It was an idea. Then I met a friend, Jofrey. I explained my dream to him. He advised me and guided me on how I could start, He contributed to making me realize my dreams.

 What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

My passion is a key to help others. It is a gift. I love to be able to share and care

What drove you to make money from your passions?

That question can be perceived in many ways. What is making money? Make a profit? Afford luxuries? It was not ultimately about making money, but I was glad I could make a living from contributions of a skill in my life pathway.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I started getting paid in 2011 when I started to work doing what I love doing.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I didn’t think about giving up. Sometimes I face challenges but I know challenges are part of life. I keep think positive and focus on my passions.
Having people around who encourage me every time makes me feel strong every day. I believe with God everything is possible

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

When I am teaching there  I try to be creative and make my students enjoying the class.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

By doing all I can do to help to motivate other people and change their life when they are looking at my success. If I don’t make a difference for doubters, I will spread out and make a difference  to others!

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

When you work hard on your passion you will reach your destination. Don’t let your passions fade. Work hard to awaken your passions and make your dream come true. I know I did!

https://web.facebook.com/bryansarimbo?ref=br_rs

#CreatePreneurAfrica Sipho Mushwana , LAW OF RHYTHM. LAW OF ONENESS

KARIBU.....He sees his calling as a mission for all to fall in place one day! SIPHO Mushwana has a soul passion. A soul passion of UBUNTU. A writer, a musician, and a teacher and a soul Pan African visionist...he is ready to set stage for the unity of Africa across tribal or geographic locations!

"I am fully in the field of Afrikan Culture and education for the development of the Afrikan nation" ...........Sipho Mushwana

UBUNTU is the essence of life, the Afrikan way. Sipho Mushwana, #ExploremotherladAfrica author and editor, and also  on a screenplay team of ‘ SHUJAA, KIROHO MTOTO  set up to be the feature film launch of the millennium..…..

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/createprenuerafrica-proudly-tanzanian-actor-kihaka-gnd/

 

His life chapters are engraved in his collection of  expressive writings:

  • ONCE WAS IMPORTANT
  • GOVERNMENT TERRORISTS
  • THEY KNELT AND PRAYED MAMA
  • BETRAYAL

His soul introduction is circumvented in his essays

  • ÚBUNTU,
  • NURTURED BY NATURE
  • CHURCHES IN AFRICA

He grows in his creativity and content and rhythms of emancipation He has engaged in multiple projects in various studios and keeps shining the light.

He has a soul passion for KISWAHILI.  The liberating and uniting language across tribes and ethnicity for A Pan-African cause – The world is awakening into a realization and uprise of a continent bearing centuries of downgrade and shame.

Meet #CreateprenuerAfrica  SIPHO MUSHWANA  steering the realms of PAN AFRIKA

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is my soul calling. A purpose driven life. I see myself as one of the single rays of the sun that illuminates the entire universe as a single droplet combined to make the biggest ocean.

What drives my movement is the journey of self-experience. That is the biggest aspiration. To fully explore, experience and manifest the god, Goddess power and essence in me.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I became conscious of myself in1999 when nature and the universe ushered me into the area of PAN-AFRICANISM AND AFRIKAN SPIRITUALITY. Since then I have been growing

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

By the  UNIVERSAL LAW OF RHYTHM,  nothing is permanent. All things come and pass. So I keep real and true  to my PURPOSE OF THIS REINCARNATION as I also acknowledge that  soul transition may happen at any moment in life

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

Depends on what payment is defined as. I have been paid with the realisation of my purpose in this universe. Rewarded I can say. A gift beyond borders

Let’s develop the script fully and make it more competent for the market THEN THE UNIVERSE WILL AWARD THE PROJECT WITH SUPPORT FINANCIALLY

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Even if it is 100% overcast in the day, The sun never fails to give light. This natural phenomenon inspires me to tackle challenges with all courage and self-realness

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

OK, another person’s eyes are my mirror to see some parts of me and the feedback fuels my energy field to think extra creatively and work extra harder in all that I do. To them, I say I always take their doubts for motivation BECAUSE IN MY INNER WORLD PESSIMISM HAS NO PLACE. I advise all to always see the light in the next person and also have faith in that EVEN THE LITTLE SPARK OF A FLAME CAN GROW INTO THE BIGGEST FIRE OF LIFE.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

I advise all to get intact with their inner selves and discover the nature of creation in them. Nurture that into self-manifestation. All is possible when we align our psyche body soul into the laws of the universe