#CreatepreneurAfrica : Storyteller, Poet and Filmmaker, Cape Town’s Weaam Williams

A vision to transcend bigotry and reach a realm where people realize their aspirations and dreams,soul spirit, South Africa's Weaam Williams  from Cape Town, weaves  her  concious storytelling voice beyond borders as a poet, a writer, a filmmakerand a performance artist.

With a cinematic vision as an activist and Muslim woman, Weaam Williams, a screenwriter, director and poet was anointed as a member of  Film Fatales, a New York-based organization representing women female directors.

She seeded Tribal Alchemy Productions, a  visual medium platform specializing and video and photography.

Her directorial debut, Hip-Hop Revolution,  hit the international scenes at Silverdocs in 2007. It won the best Edited Film Award at NYC Reel Sisters Film Festival in 2008, and was broadcasted in 28 countries.

In 2009-2013 she undertook an independent filmmaking project for Southern African distribution.

“A Khoe Story Docu-Tirlogy”, is a three part documentary series about the language, genocide and remaining culture of South Africa’s indigenous people.

“A  Khoe Story’  was officially acquired as material for  South Africa’s high school curriculum as well as  universities as  an awakened historical knowledge  of SA’s indigenous people

Her latest iconic film “District Six Rising” from the Dust was initialized when she moved into District six with her cinematographer husband Nafia Kocks

The vibrancy and culture of District Six is rooted in a personal story examining intergenerational pain and wealth dispossession. It reflects an aurally and visually rich perspective with nuanced Cape Malay community moments.

Weaam Williams is currently working on a screenplay for a feature film and will soon start production for a short film titled “Two Hues”  as a  writer and director.

 

Meet  #CreatepreneurAfrica’s  Cape Town’s ‘Conscious Storyteller’, Weaam Williams

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I am passionate about telling stories, this I would attribute as my
true passion. I am an activist by nature and my documentary portfolio is
inclusive of many human rights films which were inspired by people or
causes I was passionate about at that particular intersection of my life.

My work ranges from “Hip-hop Revolution” to Khoe Story Docu Trilogy” – a
series about the history, language, and culture of SA’s indigenous people.
This series brought the genocide of the indigenous people into the
foreground in 2011/12.

I don’t stop being passionate about these causes, but rather allow communities to use my films for activism purposes. The Griqua Nation and other indigenous groups have used the Khoe Story extensively for lobbying purposes – for recognition of the “mother tongue” etc. I do, however, as a story-teller move on to new projects  and my most recent film District Six Rising from the Dust – is the first personal narrative.

I have undertaken to tell the story of my family being forcibly
removed from District Six and my own journey after being restituted a
house awarded to my grandfather. This film was completed recently and will
be exhibited in 2018.

It has inspired my community in District Six, and also encouraged a call
to action. I am, however, moving onto fiction narrative projects. I am
currently in production for a short film and writing a screenplay for a
feature-length film, I am very excited about both these projects.

However, I cannot speak of them yet.  I have a background in poetry and performance poetry. I stopped doing performance poetry when my film career took off as filmmaking requires a great deal of commitment and is all-encompassing.

I found very little time to nurture myself as a poet. However, I have a deep love for poetry and sometimes still write the odd poem when I feel
inspired – however, it’s been a very long time since I have shared my
poetry with audiences. I hope to do this again

 How did you find your passion and how old were you?

At high school level, I had shown a flair for languages and writing – I
enjoyed creative writing. I also wrote plays and got my friends to act in
them.

I think I was about 14 years old then. I guess my passion as a
writer/director started then. My abilities as a poet I discovered at 16,
during the matric end of year holidays and when I started university. I
started to explore writing poetry. I was very young at university and
needed to process all of the information I was receiving, the cultural
paradigm shift and poetry was my way of out letting what I was feeling as a
young person, and trying to make sense of it.

Also, English Literature was one of my subjects and provided a platform to explore the literary greats and be inspired by them. My work as a filmmaker has a strong foundation in writing, as films start on paper with written concepts which eventually progresses to a screenplay in the case of narrative, or a strong treatment in the case of documentary.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

3. Once again it is the aspect of story-telling. In the world of film, it
starts with a screenplay/ treatment and ends on the cutting room floor
(editing).
Fortunately, I have the ability to do both write and edit, which means I
am a very involved filmmaker and storyteller. I do, however, allow room for
critique from donors, close friends, and colleagues. This is integral to
the story-telling process of filmmaking as one tends to get immersed in
the work –

I, therefore, need that outside objective eye. My production
company Tribal Alchemy Productions coined the term “digital storytellers”
which has been hugely plagiarised I now see this phrase everywhere. What
can I do?

I know that many have of my concepts have been copied and
plagiarised – it’s a soul-wrenching battle which I choose to no longer
fight. I now hold my cards close to my chest and only impart information
of projects on a need to know basis.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

4. I have always been able to generate income from my writing abilities.
It started as free-lance journalism and getting paid as a performance
poet. My first paid job in the film industry was as a writer for the drama
series Soul Buddyz.

When I decided that I would like to direct, it is also my convincing writing which allowed me access to funding grants to direct my passion projects.

I am now writing a commissioned screenplay which I will direct. I think
it’s been small steps and an unfolding journey.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

To be honest, I have never thought of giving up. There are times when I
feel really low, and feel weighed down by circumstances, be it a rejection
letter or financial strife living the artist life.

However, I have always been able to rise above this and keep chiseling, crafting and planning. I allow myself to experience my feelings, but at some point, I will pull myself up and say “Fuck them all – I believe in myself”.

I will think of a new plan and continue working. I also seek solace in
nature. I find after walking in the forest the weight lessons, and I am
able to cope. Every single artist has to face rejection, and those of us
who are not born into old money have to find means of sustaining ourselves
and families with our passion. It is very hard work maintaining this
balance.

My husband and I are both filmmakers and between the two of us, we
can take a production from beginning to end. We constantly inspire,
comfort and sharpen each other to become better at what we do, to increase
the value of our work as our cultural capital and future investment.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Of course, there is the need of self and seeking validation for work which
we have invested huge amounts of time and energy into. However, I am also
motivated by my children – as a co-breadwinner where both parents are
artists we have to strive for excellence as a means of survival. It’s as
simple as that.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

To be honest, there haven’t been many. The ones who have shown doubt, are
not doubtful of my abilities but rather holding on to a white-male power
threshold or generally do not agree with my POV.

I have managed to work as a filmmaker for many years because there are so many people who believe in me and show this either via funding grant support, acquisitions of my films, commissioned work or supporting my work as audience members. To those people who never believed in me, it is their loss I will continue with my craft and continue to be the voice of the marginalized.

The test really is whether the work resonates with audiences, and I must say with every single piece of work I have tackled the communities affected feel that I
have done their story justice. I am not going to sensationalize,
white-wash or taint a story to gain props. I have a responsibility as a
story-teller to do this work with integrity.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

My advice is to know what your strengths are and to focus on this.
Continue practicing your craft even if you are not getting paid in the
beginning, do it for the passion. To become better.

I am not saying you must work for free all of the time, but rather take
the time to invest in yourself to master your craft. Be careful of who
you share your ideas with, I have been bitten too many times.

The closest of friends can run off with your concept and duplicate it. The
film industry is incredibly hierarchical be respectful of this hierarchy
for someday you too will be a producer, director, DOP or whatever it is
you want to do.

However, do not allow anyone to belittle or exploit you.
Stand up for yourself if you feel this is happening. Put in the hours and
surely you will someday reap the benefits.

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Nigeria’s sounds of ‘Positive Force’ – Femi Kuti

Eldest son of afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti, grandson of political campaigner, traditional aristocrat and women's right activist Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti, Olufela Olufemi Anikulapo Kuti is renowned in his own right.

Femi Kuti, committed to social and political change reaching an ideal free and fair Nigeria, blends colorful tunes into distinctive balanced sounds with 'Positive Force' , the band he seeded in 1985.

Femi Kuti was born in 1962 London and grew up in Nigeria. His musical career started at the tender age of fifteen when he played in his fathers band Egypt 80  in the year 1979.

In 1986, December the 13th, Femi initiated the launch of Positive Force, his own vibrant with his sisters Sola and Yeni as lead dancers. This was his independent launch apart from his father legacy. The very first Positive Force performance was the University of Lagos.

 

In 1989, he released his first record, No cause for Alarm.

  •  By 1991 MYOB was released and four years later the Femi Kuti album was released. In 1998  the release of  “Shoki Shoki”  garnered widespread acclaim.

In 2000  he opened The Shrine, his club, where he recorded the live album Africa Shrine. He won a Monaco “World Music Award” that same year! In 2001 he collaborated with Common and Mos Def on Fight to Win, and then toured the United States with rock band Jane’s Addiction.

Due to personal setbacks, there was a four-year absence. But there was a re-emergence in 2008 with Day by Day and Africa for Africa in 2010, his third Grammy nomination.

His diverse  knack of artistry expanded in  the next Grammy nomination, No Place for My Dream . Like the legendary Fela Kuti, he is committed to political and social causes and fights for the emancipation of Nigeria.

.

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica  Femi Kuti,Nigeria’s ‘Positive Force’ 

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My passion, my soul passion is music. I aim to be as good as I can musically. My driving force is my family. I love for my family, my children, my music and making people happy.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I knew from a very young age must have been 5,6, or 7. It was just a question of how. Finally went full time into music joining my father’s band at age 16/17.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The love for my children, it is uncompromising it is. And also my commitment to keep trying to be the best I can musically.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
 It’s never being about money really. Love for what I do must important for me. Remaining steadfast to what my music stands for.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
As an instrumentalist playing in my college school band then my father’s band the Egypt 80.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I never thought about giving up.. I even got broke but remained committed.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My music. The love for what I do.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
 People who doubted me?…..
I have nothing to say to them😊.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Remain steadfast, remain committed and totally be honest and true to life.
We are  one people, one world
One people One world
US/Canada tour July/August
 

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Riaan Hendricks, prolific South African filmmaker on the “Ramothopo the Centenarian” journey

A multi-award winning, Cape Town's prolific film director, Riaan Hendricks weaves into a rich tapestry of storytelling moments engrossed in the delicate elements of his creations. He wavers on motions of a constant struggle to engage audiences with emotional landscapes of life characters and stories into the beyond of everyday lives. His latest film follows the 110-year old Ramothopo and his 99-year-old wife, Anna.

Ramothopo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He initiated his ‘sterling directorial debut’  into the world of documentary with ‘A Fisherman’s tale in 2004.

His celebrated work constantly pushes the boundaries laid out in the documentary genre. Riaan is currently completing his Masters in Film at the Universtiy of Cape Town( UCT).

Skype: riaanhendricks | Twitter: @filmseason
Vimeo: riaanhendricksfilm | Facebook: riaanhendricks

A Fisherman’s Tale (2004) “…reminds me of the art of Picasso and Diego Riviera, who had used their art to animate the condition of the working people and their dignity”
– Professor Ben Turok, 
Independent Newspapers.

His film “The Devils Lair (2013) was received critical acclaim and was played on almost all the continents receiving multiple film awards.

 

  • Best Documentary World Cinema Award at the New Zealand International
  • Documentary Edge Festival 2014
  • Best Documentary Feature Award SAFTA’s 2014
  • Best Documentary Feature Editor Award SAFTA’s 2014
  • Jury Special Mention Documentary, Luxor Film Festival, 2014
  • Best South African Documentary Feature, JOZI FILM FEST 2014
  • Best South African Feature Documentary, Screen Excellence Award, 2013
  • Jury Special Mention at the 24th Festival Cinema Africano Asia Latin Americana, 2014

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica’s  profound South African filmmaker, Riaan Hendriks

Riaan Hendricks is a filmmaker. A beekeeper. Publisher of Docstreet Radio (www.soundcloud.com/docstreet).
What is your latest film all about?

My latest film is titled “Ramothopo the Centenarian”. It’s story of what it takes to return the love and care to 110-year old Ramothopo old and Anna his 99-year-old wife – who for generations played a vital role in their family and community.

In her younger years, Anna spent her younger life as a prophetess and healer. Leprosy was amongst many of the sicknesses she knew how to cure. She assisted many barren women to have children.

Even the mentally ill were lined up at her door for help. It’s not easy to judge her age from gauging her intelligent conversations. This woman she is strong – and surpassing 100 is nothing new in their family.

Their home was always a refuge to those in need of help.

Ramothopo was a preacher over hundreds of people. It’s his feeble state that compelled his granddaughter to spend more time with him in what seems to be the last years of his life. She’d leave her Cape Town family behind and journey the 1800km trip with 2 year old Anushka to attend to Ramothopo – whom she calls her dad. Her own dad passed away when she was still very young.

The film itself is a heart-warming experience. We all have a Ramothopo and an Anna in our lives. And if time permits – we too will find ourselves where they are. After watching the film – you’ll never look at life quite the same again.

How did you finance the film?

This is one of the most expensive films i’ve made in recent years. It’s also my longest. The cost cannot be translated into cash value – since it’s entirely funded with passion, handwork, and perhaps diligence. Usually, you’d go out and look for money before you film – or when you are in the edit. This film, however – was never meant to be a film. Initially, I was merely taken by the contrast between my two-year-old daughter and her interaction with her great-grandparents. I chose to film it for memories keep shake.

However – the more I filmed, the harder it became to confront the themes as it manifested itself.

I’m of sound mind and healthy body. To confront the realities of feebleness, old age and the dependence on love and care is the hardest I’ve ever filmed. Yet it’s in the very struggle of processing the themes and translating it into meaning that a film gets born. From experience, I know that is how all my films are done. It’s in your heart where the film gets born.

Thus every time we went to Botlokwa, i’d film. And the more I filmed – the more the humanness of feebleness, madness, and love emerged.

A life experience that changes you often makes a good film. This film changed me. I could not walk away from it without translating it into cinema and be titling it “Ramothopo the Centenarian”.

Where to from here?

Well, the film was finished a few days before the Encounters International Documentary Film Festival. The festival itself has always been the home ground of South African documentary cinema. So I’m thankful for their continued support of my work over the years. But with the Ramothopo, I truly thought that this time around they will be rejecting my work!

The film has possibly the longest documentary film shot that I know of. It’s a black and white film. It’s about old age. Yet, the maturity of their film selection and their ability to appreciate documentary cinema implies that South African documentary has a great future under their curatorship. So long live Encounters!

Obviously, we’d like to have the film broadcast. It is the centenary year of Nelson Mandela. If ever a film reflects the lives of our ordinary aged and feeble – this is the one.

I’m hoping a broadcaster will pick it up – so that we can translate some of the sweat, blood, and tears into bread, butter and attend to some requests their granddaughter has for her grandparents.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

It’s in the heart. That’s’ where it starts. Follow your instinct – even if it makes little sense. It’s not supposed to make sense – you are a filmmaker, not an actuary. If the final product has no resonance with your audience – move over to the next film. It’s a combination of your external physical craft and your internal filmmaker’s voice being honed. If the festival or funder rejects your work. Cry loud. Wipe your tears soldier. Eventually – it will all come together. You have to explore and discover through your cinematic choices who you really are.

And you have to push it. When you are young – it’s easy to close doors with your restless passion and vocal conflicting ideas. It’s fine. Let them close the doors. If you are able to stand up for what you believe and go hungry for it. Do it. It will only shape your character resulting in better work down the line.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

My first real paid job was when the National Film and Video Foundation funded my 26-minute documentary “A Fisherman’s Tale (2003).” When you consider how these guys are developing our industry, making huge financial investments in our development as film-makers – often granting us the license to explore our medium: regardless of its commercial value. We should applaud them for it.

Storytelling is an act of culture – their commitment ensured great vibrancy thereof. Furthermore, they managed to create a conducive environment to grow our talent and industry. If only our public broadcaster could come to the table in the same way. Could you imagine what positive impact that would have on the emergence of South African cinema?

 

 

 

#CreatePrenuerAfrica: South Africa’s Usha Seejarim’s soul journey into artistic realms linking human connectivity

 

We all have storerooms, backyards, and trunkloads storing archived unwanted or expired products and life experiences, right?

Somewhere items are lying about like odd hangers, broken irons and pegs?

Usha Seejarim translates ordinary objects into a dichotomy of monumental artwork. Items used daily like irons, brooms, safety pins and wooden pegs mark the aura of her humanistic themes in the dynamics of space, displacement, chance and time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

2013 – Beaded portrait for the funeral of former South African president Nelson Mandela

With a  master’s degree in fine art and a simultaneous qualification as a laughter coach, Usha Seejarim is a visionary artist with an astonishing profile of esteemed works, including the Nelson Mandela funeral portrait along with numerous large-scale public artworks.

Curator of the thought-provoking  ‘I am because you are: A search for Ubuntu with Permission to dream”  exhibition was an initiative to encourage viewers to contemplate the value of  Ubuntu in contemporary life. The  exhibition comprised of  52  artworks  from a range of artists

She was recently awarded the Best Sculpture prize at the Senegal  Biennale of Contemporary African Art (Dak’Art). She remains no less than one of the laureates of this festival.

http://www.ushaseejarim.com/projects-1/

” I never thought I would become an artist as a child. I loved art, but it was not seen as a profession in social circles and the community I was raised in.  I enrolled at FUBA  (federated Union of Black Artists), in Newtown Johannesburg when my school did not offer art as a  study subject. I took part-time courses at FUBA and never looked back. I then got a  qualification equivalent of a bachelor of fine arts  at Wits technikon and my Master’s of Fine Arts at Wits University ”

Usha Seejarim : winner of the sculpture prize of biennial DakÁrt in Senegal

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica – ‘Aesthetic Extraordinaire’ Usha Seejarim

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

The constant pursuit of a feeling of complete presence and joy. Albeit fleeting, for me, this is achieved through stillness, through being in nature and through making art.

2007-2010 – Why Men, created for the Sandton Business Improvement District, Johannesburg,
How did you find your passion and how old were you?

This is always a difficult question to answer. I have always enjoyed drawing and making things. Perhaps when I was a teenager, I became aware that this was somewhat of a gift, through the attention given by others.

2005 – Pin Code
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

That despite the fact that the work is often complex, often incredibly labor intensive and often challenging to navigate, it always seems effortless and enjoyable.

Forgiveness-02.jpg 2013 – Forgiveness
What drove you to make money from your passions?

The stubborn attitude to making it work and not succumbing to easier means of earning an income that would involve negating the making of art.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

Perhaps as a student when I took on mural painting and other student jobs available for an art student.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

A belief in myself and an inner voice that said that this is, in fact, bigger than yourself. An acknowledgment of a gift.

 

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

A definition of success that is much further away from where I am right now.

2008 – Screens for the South African Chancery, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I would like to believe that I have matured enough not to care about those that have doubted me. My journey does not involve proving anything to anybody. I am simply doing my thing and getting on with it.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative's who look up to you?

I stress the importance of being authentic. Be yourself and allow your unique journey to unfold. Work hard without trying too hard. Be ambitious without being desperate and learn from those who you admire. Emulate their work ethic and not their work.

#CreatePreneurAfrica Zziwa Aaron Alone, Uganda’s King of Guerilla Fimmaking!

Zziwa Aaron Alone, a multi-award-winning film director, all the way from Uganda in East Africa,is all about understanding African culture through the realm of moving pictures.

Guerrilla filmmaker Zziwa Aaron Alone is on a mission to redefine the art of great filmmaking with lights,camera and literally,no budget!

The filmmaking industry in Uganda is undoubtedly growing. My film,‘The Superstition’, was nominated alongside Jackie Chan’s, ‘Chinese Zodiac’ at the  2014 Abuja International Festival”

Zziwa Aaron Alone

  • Nominated Best Film director in 2014 and 2015 – Arusha African film festival, Tanzania.
  • Nominated in 2016 – Africa Movie Academy Award, Nigeria 
  • Nominated Best Director- 2017 Uganda film festival

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica, Uganda’s Zziwa Aaron Alone

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me? ……  I love to bring stories to life. It drives me everytime I think of stories that can change the generation, the community, and the world.

Our narratives impact positively on human change. My passion in life is when I make stories go to screen. I feel great when stories which I gave birth to are embraced by audiences. It motivates me more and more to give them more…..

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

The way I found my passion is through frequent hangouts at a local cinema hall, aka Bibanda, with my elder brother when I was little. I think I was like five years old when he took me there and I enjoyed Chinese Kung-Fu films.

Later I found myself taking myself alone there. The passion grew and this always got me trouble at home! When I grew older I decided to make my hobby my reality.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What appeals to me about my passion is when  I am appreciated, whether I direct, write or act in my films. 

When the cast and crew are appreciated with awards and recognition, it encourages them to take on new projects. I embrace appreciation and audience attendance at my screenings each time I have them.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

 I studied entrepreneurship at the university. I am a person that hates to be employed.  The richest people in this world are entrepreneurs. Being employed by others will not make me rich.  I drove my persona into a business module rather than slaving off for another.

 

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

It was in  2013 when I was working under someone else. First comes passion, we get by, even when pay is scarce.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

First of all is when I was nominated at the Abuja international film festival for my film ‘The Superstition’ alongside Jackie Chan’s film, ‘Chinese Zodiac’.

This was motivating. My films made it to  Arusha film festival in Tanzania as well as the Silicon Valley African film festival in the USA and the academy awards in Nigeria.

This shows me people appreciate my work out there.  I have a passion for storytelling and film. If there was no passion I would have given up ages ago.  Being an artist is challenging. It may be challenging all over the world, but I feel it in Uganda.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Firstly, what motivates me today is the people I work with. They never give up no matter what circumstances or challenges appear.  We face it together.

Secondly my mother Jacqueline Guglielmino. She encourages me, she is the most hardworking woman I have ever seen on this planet.  I want to be like her.

Thirdly, my brothers. They have always had my back.

Fourthly, the awards that I win on projects with all those on my team.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Time tells, today you can see someone as low today,  but tomorrow, he might be  the one to bail you out, so be polite and humble

Be human, respect people’s hustle and what they want, as long as it’s not a crime.

So what  I can tell them is, always give people a chance, empower them and believe in them. Believe in what they are trying to do, no matter how many years it may take.  Artists careers take a long time to kick off but eventually, it does.

 Even Albert Einstein went through challenges in his discoveries but is now celebrated.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

What can I advise all those that are aspiring in this creative sector?

No matter what challenges appear, always have hope and follow your dreams.  Never ever mistreat people who make you or who have made you who you are. Have respect and focus on your path. Set goals and a clear vision for your passion and success will prevail.

   

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Nigeria’s Lieutenenant Alexander Emmanuel Ochogwu

 

Welcome to the world of an academic, teacher, lover of arts and author, Alexander Emmanuel Ochogwu, ready to embrace a world of peace!

 

 

Air Force Flight Lieutenant
Strategist
Poet and Writer
Expert in Peace, Security and Conflict Studies

 

His debut  “Diary of a Boy Soldier”, a historical fiction, is a first-hand literary revelation that chronicles everyday realms in the dynamic life and times of being a student at the Nigerian Military school

The unique storytelling journeys through adventures, thrills, and suffering encapsulated in the diaspora of life experiences at a military school in West Africa.

 

 

 “Omo” made the list of Daily Trust Newspaper ‘Most Anticipated Book of 2018’, amongst other pre-published recognitions. 

I like music, musing, surfing, traveling, solitude and locked up in God’s Presence.I am focused, with an eye for excellence. I believe in me.I can CHANGE the WORLD  : Alexander Emmanual Ochogwu

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica,Alexander Emmanual Ochogwu Air Force Flight Lieutenant

Tell us what drives you?

The realisation that life is ephemeral and the value we add along our journey through this path is what matters.

What is your true passion in life?

To invest my personality by way of mentorship and artistic expressions, on others as much as I can so as to make the world around me better than I met it.

How did you find you passion and how old were you?

Finding my passion was accidental. I was barely twelve when I realised I had elements of creative writing skill. My classmates back at Nigerian Military School Zaria (A military secondary school in Nigeria) had rewarded me with gifts whenever I wrote love letters or constructed persuasive letters on their behalf, to their parents.

Knowing I was sought after gave me the validation that I had this skill inside me. Subsequently, I became intentional about it  – did more studies about the art and began building my vocabulary library, as we used to call it back then.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The understanding that through writing and mentorship I can impart lives.

What drove you to make money from your passion?

Money is good, yeah. However, for me, money comes second place after my passion, which is to add value to my world. With my understanding that when one meets a need, reward follows, meeting a need is my drive. Money naturally comes as the reward.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

As an amateur writer in secondary school, I had received gifts and cash tokens as appreciation for the work I did.

But since I took up writing professionally, I started getting paid for my work in 2005 when I wrote my debut novella, The Diary of a Boy Soldier.

What kept you going when you were about giving up?

The biggest challenge I had was that of external validation until I discovered that I had my own unique voice and had to stick with it. So I resolved within myself that I have a special skill that requires no further validation for me to operate within the space of my belief. This decision got me over the waves of discouragement and discontentment.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

The realization that knowledge is inexhaustible and as such, the need to continually improve myself through learning from others so that I can give back to my downlines.

What do you have to say to all those who doubted you?

For all those who doubted me, I am grateful to them for making me excel above their doubts. They made me work harder and redefined myself to what I have become today, the very thing they had wanted to prevent me from becoming. They were a catalyst to this success story.

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

As a creative, you must be ruthless with your passion. You must be open to learning and abreast of trends in your area of interest. The world is not friendly enough to accept you with ease. So you must be up-to-date, proficient and competitive in the marketplace.

Strive to break through, create your own unique voice, and shout until you are heard. Additionally, you must identify what your true motivation is, and when you find it, nothing can deter you from achieving it.

Your true motivation should not be money. Otherwise, you may give up when money fails to show up as planned.

#CreatepreneurAfrica, Liberian Patrice Juah – “A Gem of Unimaginable Proportions”

Writer                                          Poet Continue reading #CreatepreneurAfrica, Liberian Patrice Juah – “A Gem of Unimaginable Proportions”

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Sandile Ngidi : ‘Africa’s Literary Empire’

Born  in South Africa on the Kwa Zulu Natal 'battlefields' of Vryheid, Sandile Ngidi grew up on the south coast of Durban, Amaholongwa.After matriculating at Marianhill High school he entered the literary kingdom.

His soul journey in the world of words led him on a freelance journalism pathway. He ventured into brand communication specialization and became a  dramatist and  Africa’s literary critic of note.

 Sandile wrote the concept paper towards the inception of South Africa’s Poet Laureate prize on behalf of the wRite Associates and the Department of Arts and Culture.

“I am driven by curiosity, a desire to partake in a bigger re-imagination of the human condition”  Sandile Ngidi

An avid advocate of literary translations, in 2006 he translated the classic Zulu novel by Sibusiso Nyembezi, Inkinsela yaseMgungundlovu (The Rich Man of Pietermaritzburg) from Zulu to English. He writes in Zulu and English. 

 

Aflame Books.

He was the editor of the Baobab Literary journal and Realtime youth magazine. His debut poetry collection is friends of the time.

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica – Sandile Ngidi: Africa’s literary King

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I am driven by curiosity, a desire to partake in a bigger re-imagination of the human condition.

How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

Words and the world of words entered my reality at home in my childhood, where my teacher parents always told stories about their world and also had books they used for school but were accessible to me as well.

Early on at high school in 1983, I began trying my hand in poetry. Mimicking really I guess,  but still expressing the conditions of black boyhood in apartheid South Africa.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The world of words, writing, theatre, books etc, all stir the mind and the soul.

What drove you to make money from your passions? 

Nothing really. Money has been incidental until I discovered that one has to support oneself at some stage.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

For my first newspaper article in the Natal Witness Echo in 1987, if I am not mistaken. This newspaper is influential in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands in South Africa, and to know that I could be paid for my passion was a pleasant surprise.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

To give up is to die.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I believe there is something worth contributing, worth the pain and the joy of creating and waiting to be heard. The written word is powerful, it can empower or marginalize, excite or ridicule – writers, especially in the digital age have become the “big eyes” through which the world is seen or hidden.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 

Nothing really at first. Money was incidental until I discovered that one has to support put bread on the table. I guess that is why I have for the better of my writing career, worked as a brand communication and public affairs specialist.

This has enabled me to consult with senior corporate and public sector executives. Clients often ask me to write speeches and opinion editorials. This job helps me convey messages to key target audiences anonymously.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 

Look deeper inside your self and try to bring the best of you. Systematically “murder” your hero as you learn the craft and bring more of you into the imagination pot.

You are valid. Polish your craft by reading, listening and writing every day. Not just for a pay or an applause. Read widely and listen to others more across many spheres of the human condition, the planet and the environment.

 

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

Feature Image by Hugh Mdlalose photography. Coming soon in the #Createpreneur Africa series,  A decade of  Hugh Mdlalose  Creations (photographer /videographer /musician) 

 

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica – La Famosà – Dominican fashion mogul in Uganda

Born in New York with family roots in the Dominican Republic, La Famosà was destined to link with the Waka agency founded by Rosie Motene, the first Pan African talent agency!

“People will appreciate my existence for creating avenues of revenues for the youth that seek lucrative opportunities”

La Famosà: Fashionist Extraordinaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

La Famosa set off to Uganda with her ultimate Pan-African vision was a mission to gather young women and men in the creations of the fashion world, to build an Africa network, gather ideas and support to inspire and grow through design and color.

“I love Africa, I love everything it’s offering me so far. I’m here to stay!

By the time she turned sixteen, she made it a mission to follow her dreams. She graduated from a technology high school, gained her cosmetology license and burst onto the world scene of fashion!

Her knowledge of hair design and fashion her repertoire as the most reliable and respectable stylist within the US.

A force to reckon with La Famosà spread out towards her screen career and created a  showreel for a reality TV show called: ‘Queens Reign Supreme’  and played the role of Sassy.

Her passion for Africa comes from a soul connection to family and friends alike.  Her love for Africa is contagious excitement she seeks to spread all over the world.

“I chose Africa because I have a vision that I will be the reason entrepreneurs will take control of what they want and need – Lanes will be created exclusively  for the next top designers”

She plans to attend university’s, high schools and middle schools in Africa with the aim to reach out to the youth, motivate them to stay in school and continue to excel.

The ultimate outlook is the creation of handsfree business programs for the inspiring goal achiever. Mold them into CEO in this 500,000,000,000 billion dollar beauty industry.

“I have the strategies, I just need the ones that have the willpower to make the industry go from billions to trillions of dollars” La Famosa

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica –  La Famosà in Uganda!

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

Making people happy, making people feel proud of themselves, changing their aspects on life, building confidence drives me to be better as a person.

It builds something in the way I conduct business. My true passions characteristics are based on how people react off of me and how I treat people. It’s become a lifestyle to reward people with my genuine ways.

I love the feeling when people take a second glance at what I’m
wearing or what I’ve said. It means interest, wondering how it all came about. It gives me a chance to stand up tall and express my desire to inspire.

How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

I found my passion at the age of 10 years old. I noticed it was a passion of mine when my mood changes every time I spoke about hair and fashion. It did something to me emotionally.

It took me away from my childhood nightmares.Whether it’s fashion, hair styling, consulting, anything to do with transforming people exteriors, it made me feel in control and complete as a little girl.

Something I looked up to. It became a dream of mine with hopes of it coming true one day.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me the most about my passion is that I can have a moment be my true self. Expressing myself through art.

I became a person that can advise and teach. It allowed me to make people feel good in my own creative way through creative designing. Introducing them to a new language. Fashion.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money from my passion was when I noticed my idols and my competitors achieving their business goals over and over and over again.. I knew that once I took my talents & skills serious along with making some adjustments to the way I conducted business. I knew right there and then that I can achieve the same. I never doubted my self.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

When I first got compensated for doing something I loved I was 15/16yrs old. I was overwhelmed and it motivated me to always push harder to stay afloat & above. From the age 10-16yrs old, I was hair designing but never got paid for it. I always did it for fun, practice, or just to distract me from my personal issues at home, knowing I was one day going to get paid for what is now my ultimate passion.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

The only thing that kept me going from never ever giving up was the constant monthly reminder. MY BILLS .. hahaha 😂😩. The more money I made, the more responsibilities I accumulated. I knew if I was to ever give up on my ambitious ways I’ll eventually lose everything I sacrificed everything for.

I had no one to depend on but my self and skills. The objective was to remain on top and remain responsible at the same time.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 

I feel like people that I surround my self, friends & family motivate me in so many ways to become more successful, whether it’s negative or positive happening in their lives. My mother didn’t really teach me the valuable lessons I know today. I learn from others peoples mistakes and achievements.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I wouldn’t relay a message to the people that doubted me. I’ll like to take the opportunity if given and give a big THANK YOU to everybody that knew I was going to make it.. those are the people I most appreciate, and thankful for. Positive vibes are what I feed off.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

My advice to the inspiring girl bosses, creative directors, goal achievers is to meditate on your idea, take a step back, set a goal that makes sense to self. Remain realistic, and stop nothing to achieving your goal. Good luck, I believe in you.We all will have a moment of doubt but always stay afloat and focus.

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Oluwabukola Michael Nelson, Making Nigerian dreams a reality!

Welcome to the world of Oluwabukola Michael Nelson, serial entrepreneur,  public speaker, business analyst and founder of the Africa democratic dreams project.

Oluwabukola Michael Nelson, a gospel instrumentalist and gospel praise leader sought to steer a pathway for Nigerians and Africans to realize their inner dreams through education, diplomacy, and peace.

From the age of ten, Oluwabukola Michael Nelson was a keen writer. He has featured in local and international media and lectured at churches and communities all over the world.

 Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica Oluwabukola Michael Nelson –  Reaching out for the rise of Nigeria

 

Tell us what drives you?

Change. I am very much in tune with the natural order of renewal, and so I see the opportunity to contribute to my general environment in partnership with others to bring growth, progress, and development.

What is your true passion in life?

My true passion in life is building businesses that produce both profits and socio-developmental progress. In essence, making money and improving lives of peoples and communities across the globe.

 How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I realized that I had a call to serve when I was a young skinny kid. I was raised by parents whose lives are committed to service to others.

My father served in the Nigerian armed forces and my mother raised me and my six siblings as a single mother through tough times and she never gave up on us. These experiences have shaped my perspective on life and have come to form my vision, mission, and goals in life.

 What about your passion appeals to you the most?

I am pleased at the fact that there are others like me – MLK, Obama, Mandela, Maya Angelou, Winnifred (Mandela), etc. I am comforted and inspired by the tracks these people leave behind. So even though my path is not the easiest, I can relate to the struggles and triumphs and final victories of these heroes.

What drove you to make money from your passions?
Being passionate about change without having the means to bring about that change is as useless as trying to clap with one hand. I realized this truth early in life and looking at the strategies adopted by philanthropists such as Bill Gates, James LeBron, Rihanna, and Warren Buffet validates that fact.
 When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Payment in monetary terms has always come through hard work. I have successfully launched businesses since the age of 18 and have staff members working for me and earning a salary.
I sponsored myself through college creating profit-making ventures. In terms of abstract rewards, when I look at how the things I have done have impacted the lives of individuals and communities, I get so much fulfillment than money can buy.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I could say that the challenges of life can be daunting and living a life of purpose is not for the faint of heart. Once you understand the principles of sacrifice and the principle of delayed gratification, you can surmount any obstacles. So for me having these principles imbibed and reading about the inevitable hurdles just like those before me gives me the confidence I need to keep going.
7. What motivates you every day to be even more successful
The belief that I CAN. The belief that nothing is impossible. The belief that I can do all things through Jesus Christ who gives me daily strength. The belief that I am living according to purpose. The belief that the world benefits from what I do daily. These are my daily motivators.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
It’s okay to doubt, but don’t get left behind. I am pressing on, you can too.
 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Believe in God and believe in yourself. Get up every day and do the things you love. Be happy. Live, Love and Learn.

#CreatepreneurAfrica Vincent Moloi : Trailblazer filmmaker capturing human existence dynamics!

 

South African born Vincent Moloi, was born shortly after the turbulent Soweto uprisings in 1976. His soul calling flourished into narratives of his motherland, voicing out the calling of the nation, both in fiction and non-fiction. 

The innovative filmmaker has directed over 50 documentary films and about 10 television series. He received numerous awards including African Trailblazer Award at the International TV Film festival,and MIPCOM in Cannes.  

His latest creation is Tjovitjo, is a drama series based on a world of hardships, dreams, problems, and hopes. It depicts everyday reality through the portrayal of dancers struggling against the system of poverty.

It offers a buffet of gripping emotions, topping the viewership charts and streaming in possibilities.

Vincent Moloi and his partner Lodi Matsetetela pitched the concept to almost every broadcaster in South Africa. All were reluctant a few years back.

Eventually, their passion drove them to fund it themselves, and they missioned to created it with their production company, Puo Pha Productions.

They then sold the series to SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), a national broadcaster in South Africa, retaining  100% copyright ownership.

An industry breakthrough of note, Puo Pha productions dominated at SAFTA’s, the (South African film and television Awards) ceremony in fiction and non-fiction

Skulls of My People,  a Puo Pha Production

  • Best documentary feature
  • Best director
  • Best Cinematographer

Tjovitjo, a Phu Pha Production

  • Best actor,
  • Best drama,
  • Best sound design
  • Best production design
  • Best editing
  • Best Cinematography

You can never really know it until you do it.

Vincent Moloi

Tjovitjo - drama pilot from Vincent Moloi on Vimeo.

Meet #CreatepreneurAfrica Vincent Moloi, a filmmaker making waves

 

Tell us what drives you?

Given the times we’re living in, we as artists with influence, have an obligation to be responsible with the tools we have. So I am intent on unearthing and telling uncomfortable stories that will hopefully build us, or at least the future generations.

What is your true passion in life?

Happiness. I always seeking happiness but it is a very slippery emotion. And my family and telling stories are two things that bring me close to happiness. In general, I really like people around me to feel good about themselves. And I always try to include that element in my stories.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

My first love was radio. Very early on in my childhood, I remember how I use to sit outside my grandmother veranda and pretend to be a radio talk show host. So I always enjoyed telling stories and sharing my opinion. Sadly I never made it as a radio host, thank God there was filmmaking.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

Making people happy. I love seeing smiles on people. A smile is what all of us can have, poor and rich. You can’t just buy it.

 

What drove you to make money from your passions?

Hahahaha…sadly I am not at that stage where I am making money yet. At the moment I am still putting money into my passion. It will come when the time is right.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I can’t remember. It is probably because I put it back into my passion as an investment. We have just produced a whole drama series with our own money. This shows how passionate we are about we doing. We are still building for now, but one day we’ll reap the rewards of all the hard work and money we put in.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Failure is not an option. Because I can’t imagine anything else that can make me happy as what I do right now. The idea of failing terrifies me.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

A search for absolute happiness. I know it sounds so utopia but that’s what I want.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

That you can’t stop what naturally going to be.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

That they must learn to try things, do things. You can never really know it until you do it.

 Welcome, #ExploreMotherlandAfrica.

#CreatePreneurAfrica- Mountaineer Monde Sitole, Peak performance “Reaching Heights of Soul Liberation”

 

A seasoned  mountaineer with a mission, Monde Sitole, adventurist, poet, and youth leader has achieved all that seems impossible. 

Born in the township of Khayelitsha, Cape Town, Monde Sitole's'Dare to Dream' expedition aimed at scaling all the highest peaks on every continent.

He has summited some of the highest peaks in the world and Africa highest peak,Kilimanjaro more than once! 

Monde Sitole was 16 when he sailed all over the globe, attending an onboard school on the SV  Concordia. The sailing vessel sailed all over the globe from Cape Town to  St Helena, Namibia, Fernando Island, Ascension Island, Brazil, Trinidad,  Bermuda, Tobago, and  London.

Representing Africa at the Pangaea Mike Horn camp for young explorers, Sitole’s spark of exploration and his inner desire to spread hope ignited.

From Africa’s highest Kilimanjaro in Tanzania to  Europe highest peak Russia’s  Mount Elbrus and the highest peak in North America, Denali in Alaska, he aims to keep conquering. He plans an adventure of climbing Mt Everest next without any bottled oxygen!

Nominations and Awards

  • “One of Nine Bravest Men We Know” ,by Men’s Health magazine
  •  “Heart Of Gold Bravest Men We Know”, awards by  Intrepid Explorer magazine
  • Honorary award at City of Cape Town’s Khayelitsha Awards.

Sitole dedicates time to help youth overcome challenges that seem insurmountable. The lessons learned in world adventures and travels have become his tools to inspire hope in others, to aspire, believe and achieve.

South Africa is reaching new heights with the Monde Sitole Foundation, stepping stones for the youth of Africa to spearhead their own destinies with impact and meaning in an integrated, holistic approach in the realms of education.

 

Education is more than just getting a job!

 The Monde Sitole Foundation focuses on youngsters in townships and remote areas in South Africa. The aim of the foundation is producing compassionate beings and high achievers. The ultimate aim is reducing school repetitions and dropouts and instilling hope for Africa’s future.

 

When I’m on a mountain I carry the suppressed dreams of every township kid on my backpack .

Monde Sitole

Meet CreatepreneurAfrica – Mountaineer Monde Sitole

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I always say when I’m on a mountain I carry the suppressed dreams of every township kid on my backpack.

My mission is firm and stern,  that is to reinvigorate that latent potential in all to grab hold of their dreams no matter how big, small or absurd they might seemingly appear.

Einstein said” an object continues to move in a direction unless a force is exerted.

“ I am that force”

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

Growing up I’ve always been precocious. My first question is what sparked everything: “Do blind people dream in pictures? ‘

Next thing I knew from the age of 14, I was reading the likes of  Carl Jung, Bertrand Russel, and George Santayana. I went from one religion to the other…questioning.

I always say one thing led to another. I’ve always dreamt Niagara Falls. The first country I visited was Canada when I sailed on SV Concordia attending class. Afloat a shipboard school where we sailed from Cape town to Bermuda island.

What I’ve discovered is that fear and doubt are actually not taboos as society status quo might like us to think , but within fear is when you find your truest version of yourself and within doubt is where you find the most potent version of the truth ….so only those who risk going far can really find out how far they can really go. Ts Eliot once said.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The Wanderlust has lured me to the seven lonely seas. 

Has dumped me on the tailing-piles of dearth.

The Wanderlust has haled me from the Morris chairs of ease.

Has hurled me to the ends of all the earth.

How bitterly I’ve cursed it, oh, the Painted Desert knows

The wraithlike heights that hug the pallid plain,

The all-but-fluid silence, — yet the longing grows and grows

And I’ve got to glut the Wanderlust again.

I’m a wanderlust by nature. I think we all are the is no success no failure just life and what you piece together.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

That has never been my aim.  Making money is a science and if you follow few laws and systems you eventually get the knack.  My main mission is to develop Africa .

“Our people are not fighting for ideas but tangible things to make their lives better”- Cabral.

W.E.B Du Bois said  “Now is the accepted time, not tomorrow, not some more convenient season. It is today that our best work can be done and not some future day or future year. It is today that we fit ourselves for the greater usefulness of tomorrow. Today is the seed time, now are the hours of work, and tomorrow comes to the harvest and the playtime.”

These are pertinent words indeed.

But we cannot dwell on them unless we fully comprehend that we first need to approach our challenges with the will and imperativeness they so desire, or else we will always fall short wishing on shooting stars and building sand castles.

This is primarily aimed at power, it is urgent that leaders fast realize power is, in fact, a noble privilege, to serve, to lead and be led. A mutual enabler and equalizer much like a hammer in that you can either destroy with it or build a new era altogether.

Unless we invest in education, free quality education that is, founded on people, innovative, empowering and engaging.

Unless that time we cannot speak. When we talk about education we not simply talking about you getting a job and living it out in a posh life, but we marginally talking about advancement of Africa, decreasing the brain drain and skills development, capacity building, a nation that is self-sufficient, functioning, independent, can partake, innovate and adapt to increasingly globalised world.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

For keynote, I did for Ackerman’s end of the year Gala event when I was 15 years and same week I did another talk as Cipla Ambassador when Cipla was facing troubles I was one of strategist that came to share few insights.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up? 

The is a wish then the is an intent until you transform that wish into an intent you can never fully live your dream. Your purpose.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? You can hate me, you can love me, but you can’t ignore me.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

The impossible exists because we don’t strive to make it possible

 

Venture into the world of magnificence. #ExploremotherlandAfrica

CreatePreneurAfrica – Botswana’s Donald Molosi’s “Critical love letters to Humanity”

It was a soul calling for Donald Molosi...born with a passion to spread the word. A renowned writer, playwright, and actor, he has been awarded over twenty-five acting awards internationally, fifteen writing awards and was the first Motswana to launch performances on Broadway.

“critical love letters” to humanity – Molosi describes his work in a BBC interview

In his viral essay “Dear Upright African”, Molosi explores the need for a liberated school curriculum in Africa. It is a calling for genuine African history in African classrooms.

He delivered a keynote address at the Bucknell University’s Black History month,  themed on the archives of post-Colonial African performance.

From an early age, Molosi sparked a flair for performance naturally. By the time he turned sixteen, he was already on the journey of touring with arts festivals and co-writing plays.

Molosi was the youngest to hit the airwaves when he became a Yarona Fm radio announcer.

He was a child presenter on Botswana Television in partnership with UNICEF to empower youth and make their voices count.

When he was seventeen, he wrote his solo performance, “Fragments,” based on children’s rights. The critically acclaimed  “Fragments” got him invited to the United Nations General Assembly on Children in New York and he performed  for world leaders like Kofi Annan and Nelson Mandela.

He continued to advocate for children’s rights through his  “Can I live” poetry exhibition, based on interpretations of the  African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child.[11

A language historian, Molosi is multilingual. He speaks Setswana, French, Swahili, and English. He is conversational in Ndebele and Zulu. His writings have shed light on the diversity if Africa in multiple narratives, debunking misconceptions of Africa.

He is currently represented by the  Pan African Waka Agency, founded by  award-winning actress and media proprietor from South Africa, Rosie Motene.

Theatre

  • 2003   Fragments

  • 2008   Blue Black and White

  • 2010 Today it’s me

  • 2013 Motswana: Dream again

  • 2017 Tumultuous

  • 2017 Yaguine and Fode project

  • 2017 Black Man Samurai

Filmography

2016 A United Kingdom

2009  Given

2007  Green Zone

  • 2006 Breakfast in Hollywood

His latest documentary, “We Are All Blue,”   an Africa Day premier on May 25, 2017, debuted all over Africa on DSTV, Multichoice. The documentary carries the final televised interview with the  late  Sir Ketumile Masire, former president of Botswana

It has premiered at the Ditshwanelo Human Rights festival and made a cinema debut in conjunction with the first Dalai Lama visit to Botswana.

Molosi shared the stage with Dalai Lama in the historic conference to explore the African way of life, Ubuntu/ Botho in the modern Botswana era. 

The  framework to heal the trauma of the colonialism and trauma  legacy, advancing in social justice and equality.

 

Molosi is also a songwriter and a singer and has a project lined up to showcase singing and songwriting.

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica Donald Molosi

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I am driven by the desire to live a life of purpose. My true passion is to express myself through writing and performance and I am elated to be having my passion as my profession, therefore.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

My passion found me before I was born. I knew at 4 what I would do with my life and it is exactly what I am doing today.

I have been performing all my life and my early start meant that by the time I was 15.  I was internationally recognized enough for me to address the UN General Assembly at that age.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

I don’t think of my passion as something that necessarily has to have a wholesome appeal to me. It is a calling and I need to fulfill it to keep my spirit and the world around me stable.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

The need to grow the same passion. The ability to finance my plays and films and still travel the world launching my books.

I monetize what I do purely so that I can invest in my talent and growth and have freedom as an artist without being held hostage by misguided sponsors. That is partly because I come from Botswana where a real artist can only survive by investing in themselves.\

In Botswana, there are two ways to survive as an artist, generally – either by corrupt means or by monetizing your talent.

That is why I enjoy working on Broadway and Hollywood half of every year because in the US you actually compete against other talent and the arts are not subject to the corrupt whims of politicians.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I definitely don’t recall the first time as I was below 10. I recall being extremely excited when I got my contract with Yarona FM when I was 15.

I was paid really well by Yarona FM even as a newcomer at the time. I was the youngest person on the radio at the time and the year was 2001.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I have had challenges but I am not sure that I ever wanted to give up. I operate in full knowledge that this is my life’s purpose and legacy.

So, even when I face challenges I go through them without shaking the core of what I do in the first place. And that is because I am clear about the legacy that my name should leave behind.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I only pursue success so that I can better help and mentor others. For me, success is never really for the individual alone.

I choose to live a life where I challenge myself to use every day to be there for myself and others. That motivates me to get up in the morning because that is work that is never finished.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I have nothing to say to them. I will let my work speak for itself and hopefully, they will learn from it the value of talent, hard work, and self-confidence.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

I advise them to speak from the heart and to speak truth to power. African artists are too silent about the lack of art academies in our nations for example, and yet we pour our taxes into our governments hoping they build one.

African creatives must stand up and let the African politicians that we see the lavish ways our corrupt leaders live on our taxpayers.

We must let them know that we will not tolerate that selfishness any longer while our industries suffer and countries like Botswana don’t even have a national theater after 50 years of being a country ….And yet we have the most fantastic corruption of national funds that my generation of Batswana has ever seen!

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Africa Poetic vision : Kenya’s Kariuki wa Nyamu

 

Kariuki wa Nyamu is passionate about wording his way into the streams of life. He is a poet, an editor, a playwright, a translator, educator and a literary critic.

I realize poetry in music, in my footsteps, in my heartbeat, in my dance steps and many other great experiences –   Kariuki wa Nyamu

After several writing awards at school, university and on national level, he spreads the word through poetry, short stories, film scripts, satire, and fiction,

  • 2007 National Book Trust of Uganda literary award
  • 2010 Makerere University Creative Writing Competition
  • 2017 Winner of Babishai Haiku prize

My life revolves around poetry. I utter it. I read it. I study it. I breathe it. I teach it. I write it. I enjoy it. I dream it. I philosophize it. I theorize it – Kariuki wa Nyamu

Publications featured in:

A Thousand Voices Rising,

Boda Boda Anthem and Other Poems,

Best New African Poets 2015 Anthology,

Jalada Africa,

Praxis Magazine

The Wagon Magazine

Poetry Potion,

Experimental Writing: Volume 1, Africa Vs Latin America Anthology,

Best New African Poets 2016 Anthology,

Multi-Verse: Kenyan Poetry in English Since 2003

Co-author: When Children Dare to Dream.  a children’s poetry and  anthology

This is a test

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica Kariuki wa Nyamu

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

Well, I think what drives me is the realization that Poetry is life and that Life is poetry. Each life’s experience is poetic.

I realize poetry in music, in my footsteps, in my heartbeat, in my dance steps and many other great experiences.

And that makes poetry a very beautiful art and my true passion in life.

Basically, my life revolves around poetry. I utter it. I read it. I study it. I breathe it. I teach it. I write it. I enjoy it. I dream it. I philosophize it. I theorize it.

Oh yes, I turn countless societal experiences into poetry! And I believe this inspires the world.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I became conscious of my passion for poetry in my high school days. I was barely fifteen years old and in Form One.

I still remember our teacher of English teaching us how to write “Simple verses”. After the lesson, she assigned us the task of writing simple verses. Mine was one of the best! The following day after marking, she announced how she was impressed with me for crafting such a brilliant four-line poem!

This made me more passionate about the subject of poetry in particular and literature in general. Maybe that’s why I studied the subject up to university level… All in all, I’m dearly grateful to all my teachers and professors for kindling my interest in poetry and nurturing it. I treasure you.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

I think it’s my deep love for words and of course the much time that I devote to my Creative writing pursuit.

Yes, although sometimes I feel that I give poetry too much attention, but believe you me, my passion for poetry is irresistible! I’m delighted to be published in myriad international journals, magazines, blogs, and books. So far, so good.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

Frankly speaking, I wasn’t really driven by the desire to make money from my writing. It came at a time I least expected. My greatest aspiration was to just tell stories that enlighten, edify, entertain, and most significantly inspire people.

By the way, in the creative arts industry, if you let money be your chief impetus, you’ll be doomed if it never comes your way! But if your impetus is to learn the craft, inspire people thus be relevant, you’ll certainly live a rewarding life whether the money comes your way or not. After all, money isn’t everything.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

Well, there’re many endeavors I’m passionate about, and have been paid for… But shall we agree that passion here means passion for writing?

Good. The first time I was paid for my writing passion was in 2012. This was just after I graduated with my BA in Education, English Language, and Literature at Makerere University, Uganda. My goodness, never in my life had I imagined I could earn money from my writing!

Writing made me receive my first cheque. I’d then continue writing the radio drama titled “Home To Community,” Season after Season until 2013 when I relocated to Kenya my motherland.

This radio drama, produced by Wizarts Media, Kampala, Uganda, was successfully broadcast for years in some of the major FM stations in Uganda. I’ll always pride myself on being a part of this production.

What keeps you going whenever you think about giving up?

It’s not my strength of mind or even my comprehension of technicalities of art that shields me from giving up but it’s only God’s grace that keeps me going.

Another thing is the realization that nobody will ever tell my stories whether in the poetic form, prose or even the dramatic form…

What motivates you every day to be even more relevant in the world of Poetry?

I believe it is the knowledge that my poetry inspires a lot of people world over. I must sincerely disclose that my poetry has, in the recent past, attracted very encouraging commentaries from ardent poets, authors, and scholars; some of whom are far more advanced in their literary pursuits than me.

This certainly motivates me to mold even greater pieces and hence work towards being even more relevant in the world of Poetics.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted your potential?

Naturally, I do not hold grudges, so I guess I’d just be wordless. In any case, it’s perfectly normal to have all sorts of people around you… Some to dishearten you, some to hearten you…

Dear poet whose potential has been doubted by many, and maybe for a long time:

Be encouraged, ignore all manner of dispiriting remarks! Remember, it’s crucial to master your own craft.

Although I understand it’s absolutely wonderful when people believe in your craft, ensure that you believe in yourself more.

And most significantly, be humble, trust and obey, yes, be humble, trust and obey Life’s Author.

What advice do you give to an aspiring creative who looks up to you?

Dear Aspiring Creative,

You’ve to invest in your art and hence give it your best. Read great texts; enjoy and learn the art, and no matter the dissuasion you’ll get from the world

Never let your passion for whichever art die down. After all, you’re the best definition of yourself. Good luck!

#CreatepreneurAfrica- ‘Afrodazzled’ Kenyan Artist Cyrus Kabiru- “C-Stunner Spectacular Spectacles”

Trashy Business- Give trash a second Chance .

Cyrus Kabiru

Electronic refuse dumps in the Nairobi, the capital of Kenya was a stepping stone for Cyrus Kabiru as he gave dumped materials new life.

 

His creative pathways embody soul playfulness and inspire the  Nairobi youth and creatives alike.

C. Kabiru

 

He steps in various aspects of art, between sculpture, performance, and fashion.

His gallery has sculptures, glasses and humorous canvassed painting portrayals of contemporary life in Kenya. Bottle caps are sewn together depicting African nature.

 

Artwork beyond the regular , his life journey is embodied in the prosthetic knowledge gallery.

His obsession with eyewear all started when his father refused to get him ordinary spectacles, so he created his own special twist in eyewear. He turns spectacles into various forms that enter a new realm of creativity into the beyond

My spectacles draw curiosity and attention . It therapeutical in a sense!

 

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica Spectacular Inventor Cyrus Kabiru

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
 My passion….. My passion is my creation. My passion is my art.
How did you find your passion and how old were you? 

A young age, I forget how young I was. I just know my dad inspired me. He did not like the ordinary in anything! even refused to get me glasses I desired, so I created them!

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
Art defines me. If there was no art there would me know me.I would feel like I live a soulless life.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
What drove me? It kind of came naturally. People started to buy my art. They started requesting my art and wanting to pay for it.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
 In 2005. My uncle bought from me for $9.
After that, he felt guilty for paying such a low amount and always dashed off when he saw me!
  What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
 I used to give up on a lot of other things in life. Not my art. My work. It’s about treating it as a calling and one can never actually give up what is a natural calling. A life purpose
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful? 

Every day, Every morning when I wake up, I fell like I must achieve something. I want to raise my art to new heights. I want to soar my art internationally. More so.I do believe it is already there.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you? 

Doubt me if you need to…..thats your choice ……but not my work. It has been a long journey for me to reach where I am

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you? 

Just believe in what you are doing, be the best and if you want to move be your unique self. Be what you want to be

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Nigerian Fashionista Supreme – Ukachukwu Okechukwu

 

Ukachukwu Okechukwu has a passion for fashion. His ultimate desire is in creating designs for the ultimate image.

 

New styles erupt on the Nigerian fashion market each year. The trends are never disappointing whether you are a fashion geek or looking for inspiration.

Africans are identifiable in native wear. Today there are changing trends in society yet  Ukachukwu boasts proudly preserving culture in unique print styles.

Hi

s style kingdom is set up to showcase Africa’s style on an international level, he has established Dee Ok’s wear. Follow the latest fashion trends and combining them native motives is Dee Dee Ok’s wear fashion flair.

Young people in Nigeria need to rise again. Fashion is a tool of social change, it defines who we are and who we can be!

Welcome to Ukachukwu gallery of designs

 

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica Ukachukwu Okechukwu

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

I have a zeal for fashion and designing of clothes and to engage in the wise and prudent work of sewing of clothes with different styles, which has a universal relevance in our world today.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I got the passion when I was watching various programs that have to do with cultural wears and modern, and it has been the childhood desire when I was at the age of 10years

 

 

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

My ongoing desire to improve and create the new. I  need benefactresses to enable me to shoot up to standard in my company as a fashion designer.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

The zeal, hard work, and experience. There is a market.People live for personal style and design

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

From the beginning,  I guess. There were always special requests in cash and in-kind too

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going was personal determination Quite and unquote  “It was because of the zeal do fashions and designer still burning in me “

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I am a creator. I love new creations. I love image enhancement

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Don’t communize anyone you come across in life because every individual has something unique about him or her .thus no one knows tomorrow

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

*When you are determined to do something extraordinary and don’t allow people to kill your dreams

 

#CreateprenuerAfrica – Proudly Tanzanian Actor – Kihaka GND

 “”The time has arrived for Africa  to take on World Stage!”
KihakaGND
Lupyana S Kihaka's acting career initiated when he was cast in a stage play, his very first acting role. 

This was a calling to take center stage in his country Tanzania, the beginning of creation.
He recently joined Waka Agency,  the first pan African talent agency founded by  #CreatePreneurAfrica , Rosie Motene from South Africa.

 Meet #CreatepreneaurAfrica Kihaka GND

Lupyana S Kihaka. kihakagnd@gmail.com Facebook: Kihaka GND. Instagram: Kihaka
 Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
 I love being a Tanzanian Actor. My passion is about creating a global network in the era of Africa uprising. My ultimate mission is to connect with professional filmmakers, actors, performers, and creatives on film platforms worldwide.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I was 18 years in Secondary Boarding School. Cast for a role in a stage play as an actor.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The fact that even though there are daily battles and struggles daily,  life goes on. I believe my acting career is my pathway to body mind and soul success. My purpose in this lifetime!
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Ultimately, time is a precious commodity, and you have to embrace every moment in this lifetime and not waste away hours making a living, doing something for money to fill your fridge. Why?
And you yourself barely get time to appreciate what you gathered. So getting paid to do something you love is far off from forced labor at the hands of masters. We are past that era
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
 It was 2011 when I got a role in a stage Play as Chief Makembo (a disable Chief) I was paid and awarded for a good performance… memories…..memories Haaaahaaa
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
 I never thought about giving up. Even though film industry got challenges, I will do my level best to show up a God-given talent
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I have connected with professional filmmakers worldwide and I am still connecting. Haaahaaa
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
Do not waste precious time, doubting undoubtedly.
 Stay alert Lupyana S Kihaka is an upcoming international Actor!
What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?
 The film Industry has many challenges all over the world It needs discipline and commitment. Be strong, Be You.
His creative soul rose above daily calamities before him and several roles came roaring his way in succession.
  2012: "SunShine", a film produced by Swahiliwood, in a Role Of GND.
2013-2014,  International series (Siri Ya Mtungi) Season. 

Produced by Swahiliwood. 

Written by Andrew Whalley (From Isidingo SA). 

Directed by Ron Garcia (from Hollywood USA)

2015  Dangerous SecreProduced by Cyber - Blitz, Lusaka, Zambia

 

2016 ‘Kiumeni Film

Featuring Ernest Napoleon & Idris Sultan (a BBA Maid 2014 Winner)

2017 'Chafu Tatu' produced by Bongo Hoods

 

He is inspired by all creatives from the motherland Africa.
“We are more than performers. We bring the real Africa to the world”
Kihaka GND

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Poetically speaking : Mak Manaka

Never at a loss for words, renowned South African poet Mak Manaka tunes into soul rhyme in his rooted "arts for transformation" soul calling. 

Mak Manaka brings out the word,to the people....to the nation!
Mak Manaka @MakManaka  Award winning poet and writer.

Poetry-101-with-Mak-Manaka-and-Likwid-Tongue

His full name , Maakomele, means to represent in Pedi, and so he does! The motivating “warrior of inspiration” voices out  his poetically engaging word.

His late father was a poet, playwright as well as a painter. His mother an actress dancer and choreographer.  He was born into a realm of  ‘Art for social transformation.’

He has  proudly represented South Africa in Jamaica, Spain, and Cuba, and performed for the prolific Nelson Mandela as well!

Moving around on crutches due to a historic misfortune does not dampen his spirit as he ”words on”……..

Meet CreatePreneurAfrica- Mak Manaka

Tell us what drives you? 

It’s the knowledge that I’m alive and doing what makes me alive.

What is your true passion in life?

My true passion is the battle in articulating the conditions of truth. So the search for my true self is, in essence, my true passion.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

Well, passion found me in my mother’s womb and ever since I’ve been trying to understand why this passion. Coming from a family of artists, my late father is a playwright, painter and poet, and my mother a dancer-choreographer and an actress. So from an early age passion has been life to me.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

I’m yet to receive an answer from passion itself. One thing I know about passion is that it pays no bills but it does make rainy days seem like summer skies. I guess it’s the self-fulfillment of self-worth that appeals to me the most.

 What drove you to make money from your passions?

Like I said, passion pays no bills. Self-determination pays the bills, not my passion. I think it’s important for us to unpack the meaning and function of the word passion to ourselves. How do you understand your passion and is it passion or self-determination that makes earns you a living within the construct of capitalism?

 

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

To be honest with you, I’m still waiting for the day I get paid for my passion and I doubt that day will come coz my passion is nor for sale. On the other hand, I was about 21 when I got my first paycheck for a performance, poetry articulates condition, then it is my honor and privilege to have such a gift and be paid to share it.

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?  

It is the thought itself that keeps me going. We don’t give up or give in at any point coz we are suns, who wear heat in our hearts. Giving up is not an option but to give and share the heat with others is our main purpose as Africans.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

The love for loving life…

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Don’t doubt your self, rather support your self and buy my books.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

“Look not to the stars but to your self” coz “to thine self, be true”-Shakespeare said both those quotes a long time ago and before I can tell anyone anything I have to tell my self. So before you leave the house, look at yourself and smile and be in love with the mirror. In the mirror is the sun inside looking back at you, so look to self to be selfless.