Our City of Clay in Africa – Djenne in Mali

 

A UNESCO world heritage site, the ancient town,Djenne in the heart of  Mali,stands on Africa's mighty River Niger. A city of mud houses, streets and city walls. The ochre mud composition gives out an embezzling monochrome look.

 

 

 

The journey to Djenne is like stepping into another era. Little has changed since its prosperous 14th and 15th-century heydays.

Djenne on the flood lands of the Bani and Niger rivers is about 220 miles south-west of Timbuktu. Before  1591, Djenné became a prosperous center of slave, ivory and gold trade. Known as the oldest city in Sub Sahara Africa,  famous for its Great Mosque and market.

It was founded around 800AD by merchants and flourished. The meeting place for Sudan desert traders and Guinea tropical forests, it became an impactful trading center and thrived due to its direct river connection with Timbuktu and the head of all trade routes leading to salt and gold mines.

Controlled by empires of Morrocan kings it expanded featuring products from the north and central Africa until the French occupied in in 1893.

Commercial functions were then taken over by Mopti town in the confluence of Bani and Niger rivers, in the northeast,  An agricultural trade center, Djenne boasts Muslim Architecture and a great mosque.

The great mosque built in 1905 is a classic Sahelian mud architecture.

The highlight of each year is an event when annually, the inhabitants of the town gather and refine the mud structure, giving it a new layer to replace what torrential rains fade out. The festival of plastering event: La Fete de crepissage. 

The labors of plasterers are accompanied with a beating of drums. The drums are perched on wooden spikes that stick out of the walls, serving as permanent scaffolding and decoration.

Younger girls carry bowls and buckets  of water and mud from the river bed, and older women pound millet making pancakes,

Special meals are made by each family to celebrate the occasion. Proud of their architectural heritage the people of Djenne have long resisted paved roads and any introduction of electricity.

Only a handful of cars exist in Djenne belonging mostly to government officials that run development programmes for sustainability.

All new buildings and even the hospital are built in traditional style and technique binding the river mus with straw and grass

The building material is plentiful and cheap and the clay keeps houses cool, even with the scorching hot sun outside.

Labor for repairing is becoming a challenge in present day when most move into cities with computers, email, and television.

The architectural gem receives foreign aid to maintain its splendor and keep it the same, for another two decades and more!

Welcome!  #ExploremotherlandAfrica

 

CreatePreneurAfrica -Tastebud treats from Chef Li

READY WITH A SENSATIONAL MENU  to tantalize all TASTEBUDS, meet Createpreneur Africa, Chef Li.

Linda Nirina Rojohasina Mazibuko, born in the culturally and culinary diverse island of Madagascar, eventually relocated to her father’s homeland, South Africa. Chef Li’s cooking styles from multiple influences topple divine and delectable taste sensations.

Growing up with her mother, a musician from Madagascar, and her grandmother in South Africa , her Zulu heritage was a divine fusion into the mixture of Madagascar cooking style delights.

A member of ‘Çhefs in Africa’ she ranked amongst the top ten of Top Chefs in SA.

After graduating at a culinary art school in South Africa, she has been a key contributor to respected kitchens all over Africa. Trained by prominent chefs, she has designed delectable brands of influence.

Instagram @chefli_
Twitter @chefmazibuko
Facebook Page: ChefLi

 

1. What drives you?

The only thing that drives me is my passion. It’s the idea that food brings so much joy to the soul as well as nations together.

2. What is your true passion in life?

My true passion in life is love expressed through food and music. Every time I am in the kitchen I feel like I am creating a symphony of flavors. I like to listen to classical music while cooking. I also sing at my local church called Hillsong Johannesburg.

3. How did you find your passion? How old were you?

I found my passion for music when I was about 3 or 4 years old. My grandfather was a legendary musician in Madagascar and I used to follow him everywhere, as my mother recalls.

My passion for food started when I was about 9 years old, I used to sit in the kitchen watching my mother cook our meals. It was fascinating to me.

Eventually, she let me cook with her when I got a little bit older, surprisingly I went to WITS University after school but ended up dropping out because I couldn’t stop thinking about being a Chef. LOL! My mother was freaked out about it but my dad was very supportive.

Eventually, she began to see how I was flourishing & finally understood that this is what I was made for.

4. What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me the most is that it brings people together from all walks of life. There are no stereotypes or silly debates about it. It’s just something that makes everyone happy and brings healing to the soul.

5. What drove you to make money from your passions?

Well, it is my bread and butter, I don’t see myself slaving away behind an office desk all day so I need to cook to live. But I do this mostly out of love. Don’t let me cook for you when I am sad or depressed, it’s going to be horrible. I cook with my soul.

6. When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I was first paid when a family friend asked me to bake a cake for them.

7. What kept you going when you thought of giving up?

My one friend, Tiffany, keeps me going through her words of encouragement. She knows me so well and always knows how to get me out of the ruts I tend to put myself into (LOL). I tend to doubt myself sometimes. The last time I was about to give up, she got me back on track and then TOP CHEF SA contacted me.

8. What motivates you every day to become more successful?

What motivates me is the fact that I am the first real chef in my family. Also, because I am a mixed breed child, I have two families to make proud.

9. What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?

I don’t really have much to tell them, I like to work and produce in silence. They will just see the fruits.

10. What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

I would like to tell them to embrace and enjoy their journeys. Not everyone is going to make it in the same way, at the same time. You’re never too old or too young to start something, use what you have, the rest will follow.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

Exploring Splendor in Tanzania – Festive Season Gift: Free Promotion

 

Thank you for your quest to join the journey and #ExploremotherlandAfrica.

 

Please feel free to download you free promotional copy from the 29 December to the 5th of January.

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CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

Cape town filmmaker, Kurt Orderson explored artistic expression in his early lifetime beginnings. After mastering crafts of his creations from his backyard in the Cape 'ghettos'(beyond Table Mountain),he ventured out into the world, rising up to becoming one of Africa's leading filmmakers.

Kurt initiated his career during his studies as a trainee at the SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), earning mere stipends for daily living expenses.

He defined his unique aesthetic voice and was soon acknowledged as a director and cinematographer on several key productions.

He founded his independent production company, “Azania Rizing”.

“Azania Rizing” is a tool for the African diaspora to rise up and map African legacies around the world on a global storytelling platform.

His major works include:

  •  Definition of Freedom, examining the role of  Hip Hop in South Africa. It was screened at the Toronto and Vancouver  hip-hop festival  winning the best documentary award at the Atlanta Hip hop film festival
  •  Tribute to Lucky Dube, the tribute to legendary reggae artist Lucky Dube was filmed in South Africa, London, and Jamaica. It was awarded the Best Documentary  Award at the  Silicon Valley African Film Festival in  2013.
  • The Pan-African Express, a journey of six young men, students from Atlanta who travel to  South Africa and trying to understand people living with  HIV and Aids. The film was funded by The Oprah Winfrey Foundation.
  • Eldorado, a feature chronicles the journey of four friends in a Gauteng township in South Africa. It won the Special mention South Africa Feature film at the  Durban International Film Festival in 2011
  •  Breathe Again,  features Derrick Orderson, a marginalized swimmer from the  Cape Flats who rose above his livelihood in an abnormal society of inhumane prejudice. It was screened at the Encounters film festival and Durban International Film Festival and several film festivals worldwide.
  • The Prodigal Son 
  • Visibly Invisible

“The Unseen Ones”

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds” Bob Marley

Current Projects

Not in My Neighborhood explores spatial violence, current gentrification and the post-apartheid era. It compares Cape Town , Johannesburg and New York uncovering the threads that exist between people that are miles apart.

 

Picture for the documentary Not in my Neighborhood. September 2016 – São Paulo – Brazil

#CreateoreneurAfrica – The Soul Journey of Kurt Orderson

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is ultimately the great history and achievements of Africa, and I guess also within a broad order global perspective is my people that inspire me and drive me. I am from South Africa, a very specific region in South Africa, Cape Town.

More specifically I am from a township from that is part of a strip of what would be known as the “ghettos”,  the Cape Flats, there is a rich history of storytelling, a great significance of the epicenter of what the foundation of the space, basically built on the legacy of apartheid. The legacy of architectural and apartheid spatial planning ideally separated people  (which was an actual policy with the group areas act ) that had a great significance of breaking up families, literally…… families scattered.

I think what maintains a traditional oral form of storytelling, obviously remained significant, it inspired my body of work ultimately that’s my drive, Africa’s history, Africa’s achievements. One is inspired by  Africa’s legacy, the epicenter of academia and  Timbuktoo…storytelling and the arts and crafts of storytelling ultimately started there and spread across the globe.

My true passion….well I am very passionate about just listening, sitting and listening to people telling stories, whether happy or sad,  ultimately passion for me personally, is driven by a deep desire of wanting to change the landscape of..change  how people perceive each other. I think it’s those stories of those people who done it in the past and are still doing it, that’s what drives my passion. I am inspired by their passion, I think I apply it to my life.That for me is what passion is. Passion goes deeper, the engine or driving force for one to do something. I think ultimately wanting to do something is ultimately passion…the driving force…

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

How did I find my passion….well that’s an interesting question? I think for me when I finished high school, I was definitely inspired by the visual medium and visual arts. There was obviously the influence of television and Hollywood tv,  I guess, but also my parents influenced me.

My father was a screen printer, which is ultimately a visual artist, although he didn’t call himself that, based on conditioning of the system that shaped him, apartheid South Africa. The idea that you were limited to do certain things when it comes to art black folks were deprived in a large historical moment of what the status quo says what you do and what you can become. My father is a strong reference to creating images and applying it to a t-shirt, applies similarly script to screen.

I think its an interesting analogy, metaphor for making films, taking a rich traditional medium and applying it to my work. I think that is how I found my passion.

How old was I?   I think my first reference to start noticing…I don’t know if I can say noticing, more where I picked up the idea that I was passionate about the visual medium, I think I was maybe thirteen years old or fourteen…..

I was locked out of my parent’s house, of course. That time there were no cellphones. I’m from a family of a family of five kids, my parents both worked, I was locked out one day.  I went to the backyard, my father had a workshop in the back of the yard, and I found a hammer and flat nose screwdriver.

I used the hammer and flat nose to carve out my name on a piece of wood and was quite impressed by myself. Wow, no one before that necessarily initiated anything like that. I wasn’t exposed to artistic expression and multiple forms of what artists do, I carved out my name, varnished it and made it immaculate. Later on meeting people who carved for a profession, creating amazing things. I always reference my first carving, that was my flame of inspiration for being an artist, use a visual medium for storytelling.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What about my passionate appeals to me the most… I guess the privilege to being a filmmaker, that being my passion but also to add to that, I feel very blessed to basically get paid for my passion, for my hobby… I would say …because we love film so much I  will do it for free, that’s how deep our passion for cinema lies…and getting paid to do something you love, your passion is a heavy blessing.

What appeals to me most is the idea of  shared history and shared knowledge, when someone allows you into their household to tell you their stories…. you being inspired and, relating on a level of  “oh I knew someone who had a similar idea about this or that .”

 I think that is what the driving force is …..sharing communal space, sharing narratives, sharing stories,  sharing politics, sharing knowledge….that for me a strong appeal to my passion…

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money out of my passion…well you know in real talk, not to romanticize the question too much. We, unfortunately, live in a very capitalist society, we inherited capitalism,, were born into a capitalistic society…..that on one level, right,, that reality of things, we need to eat right, we need to sustain ourselves… in terms of monetary exchange we apple or tomato,whatever……what well I just realised that my craft, my talent, my blessing, I can get paid for it.

For me, there was a strong driving force around craft, like crafting what is my voice, what is my aesthetic, what does Kurt bring across in a common sharing space as a filmmaker as a storyteller. It was first defining my voice, after defining that idea, that is when I felt to make money.

People  want to hire you, because they want that aesthetic that you ideally represent, that was my passion for making art and getting paid for my art, as an independent filmmaker, as an African filmmaker, things are rough out there…and we want to tell our own stories on our own terms, the system itself makes it very difficult for us to sustain ourselves. I need to work like a plumber who works with tools and I need to buy those tools. That is the reality of things

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

The first time I got paid for something… I can’t recall exactly when that was when that moment was…there was a few moment I think. I think  I worked on a television show and I was a contestant, but I also worked on a show. It was a show on SABC2, I was like 18 or 19.

We were trainees and there was a little  stipend that they paid us for traveling money or whatever. It was for generic work on set like organizing cables and assisting the floor, production. I remember very little , but that’s when I realised you can get paid for this. I was still studying at that time as well.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going. I have come through multiple crossroads moments asking myself is this really sustainable, what I do, filmmaking? Filmmaking is really hard, difficult, expensive artistic form to choose. A painter can get some canvas and some paints  make a  killer piece, get to an art market  for a million and boom there we go

For filmmakers, the reality of getting a camera, getting all the equipment you need, and then on top of it, getting a team to operate the tools, that’s a whole process on its own. These things are hard when you off the grid and not part of the mainstream in the system and don’t necessarily want to be part of it.

That’s a very conscious choice, you can just join tv and become a commissioning editor, produce for television and things will be different, it will be a completely different narrative, everything is there,, there is funding for you and they hire you.

Food, clothes and shelter have no politics.

Mutabaruka

As an independent filmmaker or producer, it is very difficult… I only recently mastered the art form of really raising money for my films, for many years my films were independent, self-funded at times.

Now its like I understand more about the industry, how to write the right proposals, and apply to the right people and getting the money and managing the money.

When you at the lowest moment at the crux, paying rent, paying teams, paying crews, and rejections. Rejection is a big thing for filmmakers , filmmakers are sensitive beings, we are fragile as well  in this…. broken world

These are all the challenges that come on your journey, it applies to life as well… life ain’t easy.  The world is not nice, the world is cruel, the life we find peace and sanity within ourselves, the people close to you. There are your therapists, they are your motivational speakers, they push you and say we believe in you, that’s what keeps me going.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 

What motivates me to be successful, what motivation every day. Whats the motivation?  I think this idea that, on one level is that  African history, African stories were for the longest time ever was told through the voice of the colonizer and the aesthetic and the lens of the colonizer…..

These were told in a biased fashion…for me now, as a fellow African filmmaker, it is our duty. I feel strongly for film to be part of the restoration process, the healing journey that we are experiencing and going through as black people across the globe and the trauma that we collectively experience.

How do we heal? What are the healing mechanisms? Now to be honest with you, we don’t have a clear answer to that question. I feel collective communal sharing through a  very powerful visual medium like television or film, then you can project to the rest of the world and share that and say in order for us to be this idea of one world and one shared history.

Everyone has to have the opportunity to share their stories through there own  POV or point of view,  I think that’s powerful ways of sharing. We all have common stories. We share a common history of people all over the world which ultimately makes us human.

Every generation blames the generation before them.

 

Racial ideas and ideology, culture and religion etcetera, are just all divisive mechanisms put in place for a form divide, rule and conquer….not to be cliched,  we have the same blood and all of that. I have transformed, transgressed that phase. I have passed that idea

Anger is fine. Anger is important. We have to be angry. We can’t all just hear  I am sorry and forgive right now,

What if I don’t want to forgive you right, now, and maybe  I want to make a film about that as part of the idea of forgiveness, as collective forgiveness.

That makes film become an interesting mechanism and medium, for multiple purposes. I feel,  personally, we can use film a methodology of social healing for healing the self and healing communities.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

What I have to say about all the people who doubted me…interesting question.  I always think about, one person comes to mind, a schoolteacher.

I wasn’t necessarily the greatest student, to be honest in high school.  I  probably could have done more. I was like, reckless and mischievous. I would say, I gave a lot of trouble.

Was I a rebel? Not sure, I don’t want to throw those words around. One teacher just didn’t like me. I was thinking about her the other day,

I think you always doubted me, I don’t think you ever believed in me, and now that my work is out there in the mainstream? I wonder if she saw my name out there. I wonder what she would think, after seeing what I had done.

I don’t want to reference people that doubted me.  I am not going to make a film for people. I make films am driven to or inspired to make. I don’t care about whether people agree with my standpoint, I love those who love me on the real level, beyond blood, blood relatives. My family is universal.  I am very blessed. We share this brokenness.As a broken people, we come together and we form this path of healing, the heal of our wounds….

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

What advice do I give to those aspiring creatives that look up to me?

The advice ideally would be to always use motivation. The idea of keeping it moving or just do it.  Life is about the idea of inspiring the other, inspiring other people. I think for me,  that is what life is about. Me inspiring other people and continuing the human change of inspiration.

One has to know your craft, know your blessing, identify your blessing.  But also knowing that this is a  very complicated world that we living in. There will be multiple stumbling blocks with a lot of us.  You carrying the torch, you carrying the great torch of your ancestors. You dont have a choice  , you have to keep that torch alight. That is the flame, the driving force, the fuel.

More important is to have a voice. Have a political voice. I don’t mean party politics.  Having a geopolitical view of the world and its complexities. An understanding of global politics. Deciphering the bullshit of what the news tells you, projecting that in your work. Be that change you ultimately want to see.

What you see is what you see. What you know is different

Mutabaruka

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Slavery is not African history. Slavery interrupted African history.

Mutabaruka

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Island of Madagascar- Lalah Raindimby

Launching Soon: #CreatepreneurAfrica

Do you fit the bill? Fill in the form and touch base! Feature in the publication of the millennium, #CreatepreneurAfrica!

My mission to continue an everlasting journey for the publication of the millennium manuscript seemed to be turning into a never-ending mission with a series of  #CreatepreneurAfrica sequels in continuous motion……..

I came into contact with Lalah Raindimby ,  a native of Madagascar, she hails from the southeastern portion of the Island country in an area called Fianarantsoa.

She is from the ethnic Betsileo group in that country.

Betsileo are widely known for their special artistic creativity with own traditional dialect called Horija Betsileo.

 

Lalah is the second generation musician and vocalist being the daughter of region’s Famous legendary artist Known as Raindimby.

 

 

Raindimby is credited with making this unique form of music widely known throughout the country and beyond the borders of Madagascar.

 

LALAH,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My true passion is my music. For me, music is a means of expression of life as a human being. Performing the folk and cultural music of my homeland allows me to keep my heritage close to me and to build upon the legacy of my dad and other noted performers of his generation. The music gives me motivation and strength in life.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
At a very young age, I think I was six years old when I observed my dad and other family members rehearsing for a performance in the house.  

I began to sing. By the time I was a teenager my dad invited me on stage to perform with him.  I joined him on many occasions and found that performing was enjoyable and the audience response was encouraging.

From that time until the present music has been a critical part of my life. My first love and my passion.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
I find that when I am engaged with the music I become spiritually transformed and purely focused on my music and forget about the troubles of the world.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
As a teenager performing with my father and realizing that my father was singing as professional and making money from his performance that he shared with me and I realize in addition being spiritually gratifying I could make money as a professional singer.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
As a teenager performing with my dad.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The memory of my late father and reflecting on the sacrifice that he made to expose the musical tradition Horija Betsileo of our people to the entire country and beyond.
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I have in effect become an Ambassador to keep that musical and cultural tradition alive and pass it on to the next generation.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I must continue to strive in those ideas which are dear to me and I cannot allow them to stop me from perusing my goals and dreams.
 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Well, you are going to face lots of challenges but don’t give up on your dreams and your passion, just believe in yourself and work hard to achieve the goals you have set for yourself.

Music by Lalah Raindimby

Lalah Raindimy Soul Sounds

Get ready for Right Brain Marketing- CreateprenuerAfrica# ,starting up in the southern region of Africa!

 

“#CreatePreneurAfrica” Launching Soon: Publication of the Millenium!

COMING SOON. GET READY FOr #CREATEPRENEUR AFRICA. Drop in your details in the form below, if you feel you fit in  #CreatepreneurAfrica and feature in the launch of the millennium

 

Meet  our top  #CreatePeneurAfrica features thus far:

ALL THE WAY FROM MADAGASCAR: Meet Lalah Raindimby, extraordinaire root Madagascar songstress and musician with several social causes for nurturing the future of Madagascar

ALL THE WAY FROM TANZANIA:  Meet Pablo Zungu Createpreneur Extraordinaire

ALL THE WAY FROM SOUTH AFRICA: Meet Tu Nokwe– LIving Music Legend and more!

ALL THE WAY FROM EAST AFRICA: Meet Shabani Mpita,  specialized field and tour guide  as well as a creative artist

From Lagos Nigeria, Dance Sensation Taiwo Soyebo the founder of Tourism expression, poetry, and arts festival, T.E.P.A.F

From Morogoro Tanzania- Meet the world of animation and the JUU Afrikan Festival Clenga Ngatigwa

 

From Bagamoyo in Tanzania – Meet drummer from the acrobat and drummer group, Mafisi, meet Thomas Mura.

From Tanzania, meet master sculptor and artist  Saidi Mbungu, and his passion to share his skill and uplift coming generations with his Africa Modern Art project.

 

Filmmaker taking the World by Storm- Meet Kurt Orderson– Azania Rizing!

From South Africa meet the award-winning actress, storyteller and community leader Andrea Dondolo.

Tantalizing Tastebud Treat sensation- Chef Li!

 

“#CreatePreneurAfrica” – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

My venture continued. The final touches took an extraordinary connection – The Journey of my soul. My conversations with Tu Nokwe sparkled the final touches of #CreatepreneurAfrica.

An excerpt from the “Publication of the Millenium”, #Createpreneur Africa: Tu Nokwe- ‘The Light of Africa’

Meet our CreatePreneur™,Tu Nokwe,a legendary musician all the way from South Africa. 

Born and raised during the mainstream helms of the detrimental apartheid era into an artistic family that chose to soar above the pressing system and created Amajika.

This was a youth and child development arts organization to boost self-esteem and counteract the collating mental abuse that shattered mass populations emotionally.
We explore her breathtaking lifestyle, delving into the roots of soul inspiration as we explore her pathways, sharing her journey of self-discovery on a road of survival.

Tu Nokwe,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
My passion.My passion.Where do I start? We could end up with episodes of my true passions as they flow into so many channels. Well as you know, my outlet of expression is the creation of sounds and soothing soul rhythms, pulsating heartbeats in blissful melodies.

“I am creative, I am physical, and I am mental. I am emotional, but most of all I am a spiritual being having a human experience. That is just the beginning of the “Journey of My Soul”

How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I think I was born into it and grew up thriving in the presence all around me. My inner drive & determination fuelled me to learn to play the guitar without a guitar in my hands, but two chairs strung with wool from one chair to the other;using an old guitar tutor to position the fingers in cord formations and coordination. 

My career started when I was eighteen months old! In a commercial for a soap brand. I come from a family of musicians rooted in historical ingenuity of memorable creations.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
It is an outlet of soul expression. I explore the mantra

‘Order creates comfort’. Creative self-management is the core of my spirit as I share and display self-management tools leaving those around me invigorated with a soul-filled purpose.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
The gift of abundance is an asset, allowing open doors to explore. Positive affirmations to call on wealth is a stepping-stone to encounter all barriers in the most lucid times and delve into ‘The Light of Africa’, beaming promise of abundance. 

Africa is rooted in wealth despite the world image of poverty-stricken and downtrodden bereavement that is propagated and installed in the mass media. We are born on the soil rooted in wealth and treasures beyond human imagination. It is ours.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Every engagement was abundant on spiritual rewards. My first performance that brought in a cash flow was at the age of 18 at a wedding with the ‘Black Angels’, a local band. And then when I turned 13  at the annual jazz festival 'Milk Africa'(with the “Black Angels” - the Sneddon Theatre at the University of Natal in Kwa-Zulu Natal & the epic movie 'Shaka Zulu'. When I was 18, I earned a living doing African braids at a hair salon.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I launched the first African Diary - Journey of my Soul” over eight years. Initially it was my supportive tool for self-management. 

The project sparked off out of a concerned calling out from the lack of purpose and low self-esteem that brewed on a daily basis. My resilience to counteract all obstacles, keep focus and having my effective presence engraved in all souls I touched with my talent. I never gave up; I knew there were many doors open amongst the few that closed before me.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My mantra I never cease to chant is ‘Order creates comfort. I am a spiritual being and give thanks each day for all my blessings. The campus for my state of being is joy & happiness. Not everything may come to you at the time you desire it to. However, in Gods time, what is meant to be will be.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
All I can say to those who doubted me is advise them to rise above their fears and soar at rising heights. We all need somebody to lean on.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
“Journey of my Soul” was initially used by uprising performing artists in Amajika Youth and children arts under the auspices of the Nokwe Creative development foundation founded by my family. 

During 1976 when there was a need to boost, self esteem in the helm of the grueling apartheid System in my country. It became clear that as an artist my purpose was to devote time and energy to empower the children of Africa. 

I discovered that self-work had to begin with me. Once I had a holistic understanding of myself, I could reach out to others. My advice to aspiring creative’s is journey to define you and rediscover your LIFE purpose. If you follow my life story, my hope is that you will explore exercises and concepts to develop who you are. I wish you all the best with the ‘Journey of your Soul’

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

“#CreatepreneurAfrica”:Touching Base with Shabani Mpita-Tanzania

The Soul Journey of Createpreneurs in Africa

My collective realm was a calling of "first class living".The journey was gradual,and then I touched base with creative talent and skill from the Motherland of Africa.

The crux of “CreatepreneurAfrica” was all about ” pursuing creative passions  and overcoming consistent challenges “

My soul calling as I initially launched into a world campaign was to spread empowerment for creatives to flourish.

 

In-depth root research for my voice to echo was a calling that routed me the treasures of Africa.

 The journey was a realm of inner soul space as I touched base with an overflowing database of creativity rooted in Africa. It was time! Rise Africa….

Why Africa?

Economics and Africa did not quite blend well. All I knew about Africa was famine and poverty. I realized with time Africa was the root of all. The beginning of creation. The root of creative soul. I met artists, musicians, entertainers and soul createpeneurs.

My inner soul space blossomed as I touched base with an overflowing database of creativity rooted in Africa. It was time!

I initially came into contact with exploring motherland Africa with Shabani Mpita on a venture of discovery.

An excerpt from a series of personal interviews with creatives rooted in Africa: "Right Brain Marketing"
I initially came into contact with Shabani Mpita on a venture of discovery. Meet Shabani Mpita, an artist, with a tourism profession and small business to sell his artwork.
 How is it possible to balance your profession, your creative passion, and business?
A structured schedule to keep me focused on my time and energy. Each activity can be very demanding I make sure I give all tasks enough focus so none becomes a liability.

Sometimes I bring all together in a combination of inspiration.
How difficult is it to convert from creative frame of mind into a business form?
It is stressful and difficult at most times. I strive to keep myself motivated and remain operating. My creative passions keep me persistent but to persistence as a tool of growth needs a business mindset to be in order.
How is it possible to maintain the artistic value and run a business?
I am a professional artist; I aim to get paid for my professional talents. All businesses expect payment for products and services or product.Of course, the aim is to inspire others with my artwork but I need to care for myself. I am not in the mindset of a “starving artist”. I value my work and talent so I take opportunities that pay for the work I produce
I want to send a message of inspiration to follow dreams and pursue them. Anything that one aspires is achievable if hard work is consistent real value is assigned to service and product.
 

Shabani Ibrahim Mpita, a skilled local artist, with a tourism profession and small artwork business.

Born in the notorious spice Island of Zanzibar, Shabani Mpita kept his passion for the continent of Africa. A keen traveler, he became a backpacker, exploring Africa. Eventually, he ventured in a nomadic motion back to his homeland, Tanzania.

Living all around his country from Zanzibar, he spread out from Iringa to Mafia Island, Mloka village near Selous and Kigamboni, a short ferry ride from the bustling Dar es Salaam, he brings forth an insider view into the everyday marvels and sightings. With his guidance, each second spent in Tanzania becomes a worthy experience for all who realize their dream to explore the marvels of Tanzania.

‘I aim to be a key tool in the exploration and discovery of my homeland. Life is about exploring, new discoveries, and realizations. I journey on the motions of a Tour and field guide into a pathway designed by destiny’

Exploring Tanzania https://www.amazon.com/Shabani-Ibrahim-Mpita/e/B06XJY25J9

‘#CreatepreneurAfrica’ – Pablo Zungu Art wonders in Tanzania

The journey was ongoing. The chapter seemed to be spurting out more and more. My never-ending delve into Africa. The spark was ignited into abundance beyond note. Turning passions into profit, the rhythm echoed into smooth sailing miracles.

The Making of a Createpreneur.

When anybody churns out the term “entrepreneur”, what springs to mind at the word?A briefcase, tie and suit image?

A briefcase, tie and suit image?

On the other hand, maybe pictures of those in the billionaire ranks flashed in the media.

That is a narrow view. There are vast ways to spring any creative business venture into motion.

A common theme of ‘CreatEntepreneurs’ is a risk. Many work independently, industries differ, business can gain wisdom from other varied experiences and their management of work and risks.

 

If you an artist that goes solo with your artwork meet, CreatEntepreneur™ Pablo Zungu.

 

 

 

Pablo is an artist in Tanzania in East Africa with a large international following.

 

As artist living in a remote unknown village called Mloka on the outskirts of the main buzz of city centre. How did he get an international audience, people from all over the world to buy his local trending artwork?

Tell us about your true passion in life?

My passion is filling my day creating new pieces of art. It is expression, letting go. Each day on waking until the day closes. I found my passion at a young age. Left with the responsibility to take care of my two younger brothers at an early age when my parents passed away. My art was my key to keep all together in challenging times

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

The independence and freedom it provides. I am not imprisoned in a warehouse packing shelves or joining other pathways I have little interest in, to barely fill a fridge and every hour consumed. Slavery did not die. It evolved, not through chains at feet, but into a concrete jungle. It became legalized .My art is my freedom to create an income on my terms in my environment.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

I do not know if it was about choice. It was there, in my pathway. I discovered that selling paintings was a stream of income. With no conflict of being under instruction of any authority figures and taking orders and instructions. I chose a stress free way to sustain my family and myself.

 

When was the first time you got paid for your passion?

I was a teenager and spent my time creating artwork. One-day tourists passed by, totally immersed in the piece, and placed US dollars in my hand. I was thrilled. Dollars converted into a huge amount in my local currency. I even afforded to buy more paints and canvases.

 

What kept you going when you thought about giving up? 

There were many times that I doubted any ability to make more money with my art. I overcame the self-doubt by creating and sharing my work.

What motivates you each and every day to be even more successful?

Even if I tried to join the nine to five worlds, I know I would not make it. I strived on to keep creating and spreading my work to all regions where there were possible sales. Every region that had markets or stalls for artwork I found a stall owner to display my work and draw in interest and sales.

I am based in a remote village on the outskirts of the city centre, but I prefer to be there. I live close to a popular game reserve that has a multitude of travelers from all over the world. My art is indigenous local Tanzanian authentic that appeals to all those who travel to our country. It gives them memorable artefacts to take back home of a land they will never forget and strive to revisit. My art is one aspect that promotes the thriving economic sector of tourism, so to speak.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I can only share my well wishes that they gain success in their pathways as I have found my passion and I am keeping to it.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

I advise them to follow their dreams and never give up. Look at all possibilities and find the one that works for you.


Find or Be Found……….

 

Welcome ExploreMotherlandAfrica

CreatePreneurAfrica@Cleng’a Ng’atigwa- Animation and traditional music in Tanzania

 

 

“Our seeds of creativity sprout out into roots that branch out into a world of knowledge, wisdom, and inspiration”. Cleng’a Ng’atigwa

Cleng’a Ng’atigwa, co-founder of leading animation kids series Ubongo kids and founder of JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAl,  is taking on the world by storm.

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
What drives me is to see positive changes and upliftment of lives around me. I believe my purpose in life is to instill a readiness for our new generation.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
My mum seeded my passion. I observed her praying for women and children in my childhood. Our task was to fetch water for elder women and assist them.
My mum was a positive inspiration to all around her.  When I was about eight years old, she sang to us and tell us folk tales. Every story had a linked song.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
My passion is my ultimate happiness. I get to meet new interesting people. I am naturally a creator of concepts. I create concepts that help others to learn and grow.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money is the greatest challenge I face. It took a long time for my creativity to eventually become an income stream. My focus has always been primarily on creativity.

It took a long to raise income through my passion because my thoughts were based on creativity rather than making money through it, that is a big challenge that I face.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Payments come in various forms. Some are indirect. Some are rewards of appreciation with low incentives. The first time I was paid a regular income was when I initiated a concept that became a huge success, Ubongo kids.
Mama Ndege
As co-founder of the animation project, Ubongokids, an educative cartoon series, I stepped into various roles. I was the art director, the main character, "Mama Ndege", was my conceptualization,and I played the character voiceover. 

I composed the main theme song "hisabati" and so many other songs for the seriess.
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The quality of my services. Seeing the satisfaction my work creates for others around me. My biggest challenge is raising capital.

What keeps me going is motivating others and getting the support and motivation I need to go on. Stand by me and I stand by you.

Special guests like the legendary Tu Nokwe, all the way from South Africa endorsed the initiative and was our guest of honor at the JUU Afrikan festival in 2017.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I know success. I have seen the success of mere ideas becoming lifelong projects that triumph and uplift many. Knowing that makes me keep on going and striving to reach my goals.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I just wish them all the best and pray that they reach their goals and keep inspired. Those that condemn you do so just to uplift themselves when obstacles come in the way of their dreams
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
The journey of being a creative is no easy path ahead. Strive to do what incites your passion and you will reach you the pathway laid before you.

Welcome #exploremotherlandAfrica

 

 

CreatepreneurAfrica – Saidi Mbungu @ Bagamoyo, Tanzania

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My true passion is art. I believe art is empowering. It is a golden key, an outlet of expression. A tool of upliftment.

There is no free schooling in Tanzania, there is a need for an outlet for education. The youth in Bagamoyo are orphaned or poor. I started AMAP school in my backyard.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The thought of being a creator is amazing. You are on a throne of power after a piece of work is complete. I cannot even explain that element of total upliftment.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
There is so much bereavement, so much poverty surrounding our everyday life. Tourists are free to explore and enjoy our natural wonders, but we are so caught up in our economic disempowerment. But we have the tools and the talent of natural artistic skill. This is how we can rise as a nation!
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
I remember the day. I was young. I cannot remember how old I was. I just remember the time was not good. There was little hope, scarcity at my home that triggered so many tensions. I sat outside creating an art piece of recycled materials. 

A passerby noticed. I was still in the process of polishing. They waited in wonder and handed a batch of notes and takeaway snacks and a juice too! I was delighted!
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
Adversities are always there. They come and go. I recluse and engage in a new piece of work and I am lifted and inspired.
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
The kids around me. Our coming generation. They uplift my soul to reach to the stars.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
The angels of hope are always around me. I truly hope you find yours
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
I want to tell all that aspire to keep holding on. I believe in sharing hope. We can rise up together.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

#CreatepreneurAfrica @Taiwo Soyebo – Dancing away in Nigeria

“CreatepreneurAfrica” – Taiwo Soyeba all the way from Nigeria

Taiwo Soyebo was in his early teens when he actively participated in church gatherings. The world of drama re-enactment of bible stories seeded his passion for dancing, drumming and acting.

Taiwo’s heart and soul are all encapsulated in an annual festival ”Tourism Expression Poetry and Arts festival. T.E.P.A.F is an event on the continent of motherland Africa sowing seeds of celebratory honor of true talent beyond measure.

Taiwo aims to pursue a global calling and growth for the T.E.P.A.F. Tourism Expression Poetry and Arts festival is an outlet of expression in the root of Nigeria.

 

 

There is no place like home

An artistic director and choreographer he keeps his vision alive by sharing his skills in cultural dance and drama at Edun Productions, based in Lagos, Nigeria.

 

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
I am driven by my vision and achieving my vision through my passion. My true passion is drumming, dancing and directing stage productions and films.
 

 

How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I was fifteen years old when I found my passion for arts of drumming, dancing, and acting, It all started in the church where I was residing. I learned all musical instruments and dramatic re-enactment of bible stories

 

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
I get enticed and motivated when am dancing and drumming because I play all cultural percussions in Nigeria.
What drove you to make money from your passions?

I teach very well and I get paid for the services. Being paid for your true passion is the ultimate climax in life.

 

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
I got paid first time ever in 2001 when I worked on a cultural festival for the school.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
Life may be cruel sometimes, but I stood strong for what I believe in.  I am very optimistic. I translate negative situation into positive action. The passion for my vision and hope that one day I will achieve my dreams, keep me afloat.

When suffering knocks at your door and you say there is no seat for him, he tells you not to worry because he has brought his own stool. Chinua Achebe

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
Seeing the children embrace the culture and Passion to establish my school of theatre
 
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

To those that doubted me, all I can say is thanks for keeping me on my toes.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
To all those who are looking forward to being great in art, be focused, be determined, be ready to accept challenges and overall, let God be your first and last companion.
 

 

Welcome: #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

 

“#CreatepreneurAfrica @Thomas Mura: Soul Rhythm from Bagamoyo

THE ACROBAT AND DRUM TEAM- MAFISI GROUP- BAGAMOYO

It was a soul calling to the remote town in Tanzania- Bagamoyo ( “I lay down my heart”) when Thomas Mura was born.

His life purpose flowed into the rhythmic airwaves as he began tuning in drum beats into the neighborhood in Bagamoyo.

An avid soccer player, he spent his days teaming up on soccer fields honing him into a team player for his community.

Sharing his soccer skills and easing off at the Bagamoyo beach, Thomas soon became a yoga practitioner, sharing his gained wisdom into healing pathways for the future of Bagamoyo.

Many volunteers in Bagamoyo flocked to hear sounds emanate blending in with the soul beat of Bagamoyo.

The artistic soul of Bagamoyo is captured in TASUBA, an arts college with an annual Bagamoyo festival drawing world crowds and special guests.

The Bagamoyo festival featured a special guest all the way from South Africa,  the legendary soul sister, Tu Nokwe, sharing her musical talent, life skills and knowledge into the heart of Bagamoyo. The shine of her light sparked off in Bagamoyo eventually spread out to Morogoro at the Juu Afrikan Festival.

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My passion. Where do I begin?  Well, the beginning of drumming away rhythmic healing beats. I spend time on soccer fields and at Bagamoyo beach sharing my purpose in this life creating yoga retreats and spreading soul healing!
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
My early days in the pathways of growing up in Bagamoyo shaped all of my existence.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?
Being heard! Many of our lives are filled with sea waves of tides streaming in and out. It sometimes topples our smooth flow. Drumming for me, was for me,, but the rhythm spread out. 

I am now part of an acrobat and drumming band, the Mafisi group in Bagamoyo. We plan to stream our vibe into every gravel in our land Tanzania. We plan to reach out to the continent of Africa, our motherland.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Survival. Beach days and drumming away made up the essence of me. Time to ease out at yoga sessions and the soccer field filled my soul. That is when I decided to share all I have gained,I need income as well. 
Not through wasting away days laboring for the fruits of masters.Those days have passed by in the Bagamoyo slave route days. Not in my lifetime.....
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
At practice sessions on Bagamoyo Beach. I was handed out my first dollars by tourists passing by  captured in delight by the drumming session
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
Watching the waves on the beach front. Knowing that there are high and low tides for all of us, I kept on going in soul meditation in the breeze of the sea.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I know what I can share with my world. I know I can uplift my community and share with generations to come

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I will wave them away and wish them all the best. Tide in,Tide out!
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Keep following your passions. Stay at it, even the toughest of times do pass by and you will be uplifted in spirit and soul.

 

Welcome.  #ExploremotherlandAfrica

#CreatePreneurAfrica-Andrea Dondolo,Queen Spirit Shining Light in South Africa

‘Rise above circumstances and become a beacon of hope…….

Nomasebe Andrea Dondolo

How did it all begin? The journey on the beacon of hope pathway?
It was a calling.........a calling for South Africa. The need for patriots to nurture, uphold and defend the honor of our country, of our continent, through our actions and our beliefs.

Welcome to the world of Andrea Dondolo!

 

 Spirit of a Queen – The rise of Andrea Dondolo

Award-winning actress from Eastern Cape, Andre Dondolo is a writer, a cultural activist,  a community leader, a storyteller, a Ímbongi (Xhosa praise singer), a talented bead crafter and a businesswoman.

She runs “Calabash Storyteller” a township talent agency and her own clothing line. Her other activities are storytelling workshops for children and adults.

Calabash Storytellers is an NPO focused on creating dialogue through the arts, culture, and heritage. Township Talent is a business based on innovation design

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Her early studies in human rights at the University if the WesternCape and a drama diploma with the “New Africa Theatre Association”, led her into professional productions like “Romeo and Juliet” and “Dancing 2 patterns” at the Cape Baxter Theatre.

She has featured in international feature films, “The Final Solution” as well as “The Piano Player.” A household name, South Africa television has her featured in multiple shows.

Createpreneur Africa- Andrea Dondolo

Tell us what drives you?
The need to live a purpose driven life rather than just existing knowing that after each fall you must get up and get going bruises and all are just your own scars.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
Wow, I believe it always been there, all it took was alignment and opportunity so I guess as soon as I could reason and manage the conversation with my mind, heart and soul, I nailed it, To be exact, I guess at around 25.
What about your passion appeals to you the most?
The adrenaline and fear that fuels appeal to me.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
Money makes the world go round, if you make it while you doing what you love, you've nailed it.
When was the first time you got paid for your passion?
In the year 1999, it was a theatre show called "The Good heart" at Baxter theatre while finalizing my studies at New Africa Theatre Association.
What kept you going when you thought you were giving up?
My son and competitive spirit.
What motivates you every day to be more successful?
My son.
What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?
Well  my life is exactly that, my own, live yours and prosper, by the way, no one died and put you in charge of my life, live yours.
What advice do you give creatives who look up to you?
Just run your race and keep your focus on the ball......

 

 

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica. Soul words of wisdom, CreatepreneurAfrica

Gifts From the Motherland of Africa

Get ready for sights, insights, and reviews from the continent of Africa and make your expedition of exploration unforgettable.

The festive season has arrived. The time has arrived to reach dreams of a lifetime.

It may be that well-deserved break , gathering special gifts and preparing for a brand new life chapter in the new year.

.

1. Find the best affordable lights to suit you. Make your way to the motherland continent of Africa and  reach every desired destination too!

 

2.  Gather your resources and build your library. Yours forever to savour and prepare to return!
3. Find the best accommodation

IHG_YourRate

Holiday Inn Express

 

3.Get into the sound rhythym and tunes of Africa

 

4. Get ready to savour delicious delights. Stir the pot!
If you reach South Africa ,landing in Johannesburg,get a LYNNSPOT VEGAN MEAL COUPON




5. Ready for art collections?
6. Share the Light. Light up the candle from Africa!

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8. Classic African Shoe style


https://www.facebook.com/zainabu.ngwele.5

8.  Shirts from Africa

 

 

Miracle plants in the Namib Desert of Africa

 

There are miracle plants of the Namib desert have perfected survival in the harsh conditions of the desert.

Welwitschia mirabilis 

 

This plant is really amazing. It has two leaves, a stem, and a  root base. The leaves grow on opposite sides and continue growing never dropping. They tear from the wind and get browned by the sun, looking like individual leaves.

The stem thickens and grows and may reach six feet in height and twenty-four feet in width. Corn like flowers appears at when the plant reaches 20 years. 100 flowers are produced by the female plant, the male produces pollen abundance and the lifespan of the plant can reach an estimated 2000 years.

The plant was named after the medical doctor who discovered it. Friedrich Welwitschia in the year 1860. He intended to give it an Angolan native name ‘Tumboa’, but the plant was named in honor of him.  Mirabilis means wonderful or marvelous in Latin

Described as ‘the platypus of the plant kingdom by Charles Darwin the plant is considered as a living fossil. It masters life in the hot and dry desert where other plants will not survive

The plant is endemic to the Namib desert in Namibia as well as Southern Angola. It is Namibia’s national plant. The rugby team in Namibia carried its name as well.  Mirabilis means marvelous in Latin It is a “living fossil.”

Initially, sightings of the plant are not impressive, especially when they are small. The leaves are a pale green and the plant seems to be dead.

A 1500-year-old giant welwitschia is a popular tourist attraction. There is one  50 kilometers east in  Swakopmund on the coast of the Atlantic ocean.  It is about 1500 years old and almost as tall as a human being. It is fenced to keep away trampling feet from the sensitive root system.

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Researchers in the Namib Desert have concluded that the moisture capturing is because of fog. Fog keeps the fine root of the Welwitschia’s fine roots. The Namib desert is characterized by fog.

The formation of the fog is when the humid masses if air meets the cold current of the Benguela and the fog  is blown inland

Welwitschia has two leaves that continue growing at 0.37 mm each day of its life. The patient Plant sits and waits for better conditions. A lesson for us humans indeed,

Welwitschia mirabilis, male plant (on the left) and female plant (on the right)
Male Welwitschia – Left Female Welwitschia – Right

Welwitschia also adjusts the color of leaves. When very hot, there are more red pigments,  that protect the plant from the radiation of the sun. When water is readily available and temperatures drop the leaves chlorophyll, a green pigment that conducts photosynthesis.

The Nara plant

Nara Plant

The  Nara plant (Acanthosicyos horridus). grows exclusively in the Namib desert, The leaves prevent water loss and photosynthesis is conducted through the spines and green stems Moisture is absorbed from surrounding fog,

The plant also absorbs moisture from fog directly through its stems. These plants grow on sand dunes and middle desert.Interestingly, these plants created the dunes.

The Nara plants growing on the ground, accumulate sand that the wind blows in. The lower end of the plant covered in sand dies an provides nutrients to other parts of the plant. The new plant grows above the previous one. The height of the Nara plant accumulates an addition of sand, forming the dune

 This is how it works: Nara plants growing on the ground accumulate sand around them, blown in by the wind. The lower part of the plant, which is covered in sand, eventually dies, providing nutrients for other parts of the plant. New plant parts then grow on top of the old one. The Nara plant gains height as a result, accumulating more sand and forming dunes. The plants reach heights of 3meters

The Nara plant produces tasty desert fruit. Melons that grow as large as ostrich eggs.

The water-rich food is a great food source for animals and people. The native ethnic group, the TopNaar people harvest the melons on a seasonal basis. They eat the fruit and sell the seeds for producing cosmetics for their rich omega oil composition.

The exclusive Namib desert plants like the Nara and Welwitschia sustain their long life by adjusting to the environment.

Welcome #Exploremotherland Africa

Do not doubt: Women narrate the future! “Shining the light of literature in Africa”

Africa, the heartbeat of rhythmic narrative voices, the home of authentic root information, is on a mission to reshape its distorted, desecrated image. Words spark off like distant echoes healing scars inflicted by the wraths of colonialism.

From rhythmic poetry to reciting kings, the pulsating echo from the motherland of Africa in streams of African literature is rooted in oral tradition, moral values, cultural systems and laws that were passed on from wood fires in the villages spreading voices to be heard, passing through the rivers and mountains.


The Diverse Literature of Africa

Writers from the continent in the contemporary era bring a diverse perspective of the multifaceted and complex continent of Africa.

Wole Soyinka from Nigeria spread the wings of Africa literature awareness and development after claiming the Nobel prize in 1986. Magical extraordinaire from Africa followed with Ben Okri and ‘The Famished Road’. The enchanting tale from Africa in a magical tone of realism and claimed the poetic prose Booker prize in 1991.

Somalian novelist, Nuruddin Farah received the 1998 Neustadt Prize prize. Nigerian author emerged with ‘Measuring time’ and Mozambican Mia Couto’s lyrically delicious read  “The Last Flight of the Flamingo” took off in a magic realism masterpiece of note.

Sembene, Achebe, Hampâté Bâ, Kourouma, Marechera and Armah dominated the literary scene,  then came the flowing voices of women in Africa with Mariama Ba and Bessie Head who pioneered African feminism.

 The Literary Voice of Women from Africa

The last two and a half decades women writers came to the fore. From the classic ‘Nervous conditions” by Zimbabwean Tsitsi Dangaremba to  Cameroon’s Calixthe Beyal, showcased women from Africa that excel in literature.

Nervous Conditions -Tsitsi Dangaremba
Calixthe Beyala : La Plantation

 

Female writers came to the forefront like Fatou Diome, the acclaimed ‘The Belly of the Atlantic’ author.

The autobiographic ‘The Devil that Danced on the Water’ announced Aminatta Forna another great writer from the land of  Sierra Leone, home of Syl Cheney-Coker, an acclaimed poet.

A young girl from Nigeria, ‘Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’ made her debut on the literary scene taking the world by storm with ‘Purple Hibiscus’.  ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’ followed, an epic of the Nigerian civil war.

Amma Darko, a tax collector expanded her creativity in Africa’s expression in the linguistic field. She published (Der VerkaufteTraum) Beyond The Horizon

Amma Darko – Beyond the horizon

Monica Arac de Nyeako from Uganda claimed the 2007 Caine Prize.

The past ten years have seen the emergence of publishing houses and broadened our understanding of the savannah. The diverse narrative from Africa continues globe trotting.

The internet has widened pathways for authors to circumnavigate the traditional publishing house methods, earn revenue and create online fans. EC Osunde proved this after winning the 2009 Caine Prize for initially published on Guernicamag.com.

The Caine Prize has provided a recognition for African writing in an annual platform to ensure the development of writing on the continent.

Binyavanga Wainaina, after winning the  Caine Prize in 2002  initialises, Kwani,  a  literary review in Africa. The infrastructure of African writing continues to develop with new publishing houses and the information exchange online of databases and African studies as well as social networks like twitter transcend all publishing barriers giving a Voice to Africa.

The Colonial Linguistic barriers  dividing  Africa – reinforced

The question of language was always debated regarding the logic of English in literature writing in indigenous languages grew

Ngugi Wa Thiong’   wrote his novels ‘Devil on the Cross’ and ‘Matigari’ in Kikuyu and abandoned English, the language of colonizers.  ‘Devil on the Cross’ was successful in sales and emerged with 50,000 sold copies.The landmark of indigenous language in African literature.

 

Linguistic barriers perpetuate the divisions rooted in colonialism preventing literature from Africa to become cohesive in a movement of Pan Africanism.The Uk celebrates English writers from Africa, France endorsed authors in Francophone brackets from Mali Senegal and Côte d’Ivoire.

Translations do exist, but it is common for intellectuals to get sponsored by ex-colonies. Further investment in translation in the core for Pan Africa readership and appreciation. Established pan African faculties may be the key to resolving the challengeThe challenge of building local markets and readership remains. The selection of a book in the country’s national curriculum can guarantee sales. Sales need buying power and literature is not prioritized as many live in poverty.

The selection of a book in the country’s national curriculum can guarantee sales. Sales need buying power and literature is not prioritized as many live in poverty. Writings contrast the picture of Africa as a continent of darkness and delusion with narrative posing the eclectic and fruitful real Africa.

The call for Africa to rephrase history had arrived in 1986 when Wole Soyinka took center stage as the dramatist in poetic overtones. Exposing corruption and political injustice was no smooth flowing route, -yet the mission to fade away the myth of  Africa being incapable contributes to the need for Africa writing.

Welcome : Explore the World in Africa

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

SOUTH AFRICAN LEGEND TU NOKWE @ JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL-MOROGORO ,TANZANIA

Alight, Arise and Shine. Tu Nokwe in Tanzania

At the recent festival in Morogoro, Tanzania, festival organisers were delighted when the legendary  Tu Nokwe, the Light of Africa made her way from South Africa to share her light and lead pathways to soul emancipation.

Join our Journey- Coming Soon- News and Reviews JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL, Morogoro, Tanzania

 

 

 

 

 

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