#CreatePreneurAfrica Tanzania’s Lead Singer Hillary More, tuninginto Africa’s soul rhythm of traditional Calabash

Are you ready to tune into the traditional  indigenous sounds of the Calabash instrument?

Hilary More’s live performances, infused with passion ,blends into unique  sounds of the beating drums .
Born in  Tanzania, East Africa ,in Temeke, Dar-es-Salaam as the 6th child in a family of eight ,Hilary was raised by single mum and grandmother .

His talent was seeded in childhood activity would be drumming empty buckets and gallons and singing to peers at school and family at home

By the year  2007,  there was a universe calling  and Hilary found a job as a painter at Dodoma University and relocated. It was there that he was discovered by Bushoke, a popular musician in Tanzania when he was serving the T.O.T band as solo and Tumba player…. which was his part-time job.

Bushoke then  invited him to his band which and they performed in various hotels in Tanzania  In 2008, Hilary joined the Fimbo band as solo  and took second place in Tamasha la kale contest. It was during this competition, when Cocodo band saw Hilary and approached him to join them,

Currently, Hilary his own band which is known as Hilary More band which performs in different festivals and hotels in Dar-es-salaam.

Meet #CreatePrenuerAfrica Hilary More, Tune into Tanzania’s soul calabash sounds

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?


Personally I am driven by the atmosphere in my heart to love to share my thoughts with the world through my voice by mixing it with musical instruments. My passion is to see my music reach more people in the world. wide.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

My passion I have discovered since I was in primary school I found myself like to sing and dance so I was playing drums and cans while singing to my classmates.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

For the first time I remember being paid was in 2005 with a bushoke band as a singer and cashier.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

 My passion for music has given me money from the perfomences that I have made though not a lot of money but they help to meet my small needs

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?  What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

There are times when it really comes and I despair but the only thing that makes me move forward is my family coz I want to do something that will make them proud and I also music is something that gives my life meaning.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
 

I just want to tell you that everything is possible with a strong intention but also not to judge too much by looking at the outward appearance of a person or thing.

 What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?
 

Creatives who look at me I would like to advise them to value their ideas and not let other people tell them that it is impossible to do what they think.

 

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica ‘South Africa’s Donovan Wright ‘Dare a Survivor and Win By Losing!

South Africa has it’s own database of local heroes and Donovan Wright is undoubtedly  one of them.From the humble beginnings of the Cape Flats to the dusty streets of Pacaltsdorp,where he grew up, Donovan went on to finish fourth in the comrades 2000 and was the first South African home in 1996

“Any achievement of significance requires desire.No one can coach desire,I wasn’t born at a time of feasting.Desire was my only hand out!

A riveting true story of inspiration, courage and transcendence above all obstacles  Running4life@2020 – Dare to Survive , Win By losing is an exceptional portrayal of the triumph of the human spirit.

Donovan was at the peak of his running career, he achieved national colours for the 1995 world student games in Fukuoka Japan, he was the first South African home in 1996 and came fourth in Comrades 2000 when he learnt of his life-threatening brain tumour, at the same time he was expecting his third son. Subsequent brain operations left him partially deaf and paralysed on one side of his face, yet Donovan remains determined to conquer Comrades

“Adversity only fuels my burning desire to succeed,Disappointment brings out the fire in me”

Running4Life@2020 -Dare to Survive ,Win By losing is a campaign  uplifting and motivational in its approach to demonstrate the necessary life skills to acquire success

Donovan Wright is running4life@2020 

A multiple survivor and post-cancer as well as bone marrow transplant and went to win 2 athletics global medals at world champs (silver in 2017) and (bronze 2019)

 

Running4LIfe@2020 DARE TO SURVIVE – WIN BY LOSING! , is a campaign for world viewers and set to go viral!

 10 km in an 1hour is for active athletes without health issues. Let’s see if I can run 10km under 60min given my health history.  Dare a Survivor , Win by Losing.  Donovan Wright

#Running4Life. Ready , Get Set,Let's Go!

Meet CreatePrenuerAfrica – Donovan Wright , The Man that does not know How To Quit!

 Tell us what drives you?

Be the best I can be. To leave a legacy that states, “that man does not know how to quit and he applies himself 150%”.

What is your true passion in life?

To live life to the fullest in achieving my best in whatever I do by truly dedicating myself to it

How did you find your passion and how old were
you?

I discovered myself through running at age 9. I learnt to compete. I learnt that to compete that you must work hard and apply yourself. I learnt that hard work pays.

What about your passion appeals to you the most?

The intensity of competition and believing you can win against all odds.

What drove you to make money from your passions?

It was easy, I did it for passion, passion drove me to be relentless in pursuit, being relentless delivered results and results brought rewards such as status and then also money in most instances

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

In 1994 on winning my first marathon and gaining national colours to represent my country at world champs. Then as I performed at higher levels and at different events, I was rewarded for performance by greater sums of money

What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

Knowing that failure was a stepping stone to greater success

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

Want the best out of me and knowing that I have not gotten to that space yet, there is much more to me and even more to achieve.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

I hope that your doubts in me helps you to believe in what can be achieved, even for yourself. Do not ever let doubt limit your ability or that of others.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

Put your head down and work for what you believe you can achieve, failing is a route to success, but perseverance and tenacity is your key and totally in your control.  Hope you can source it.

Our City of Clay in Africa – Djenne in Mali

 

A UNESCO world heritage site, the ancient town,Djenne in the heart of  Mali,stands on Africa's mighty River Niger. A city of mud houses, streets and city walls. The ochre mud composition gives out an embezzling monochrome look.

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The journey to Djenne is like stepping into another era. Little has changed since its prosperous 14th and 15th-century heydays.

Djenne on the flood lands of the Bani and Niger rivers is about 220 miles south-west of Timbuktu. Before  1591, Djenné became a prosperous center of slave, ivory and gold trade. Known as the oldest city in Sub Sahara Africa,  famous for its Great Mosque and market.

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It was founded around 800AD by merchants and flourished. The meeting place for Sudan desert traders and Guinea tropical forests, it became an impactful trading center and thrived due to its direct river connection with Timbuktu and the head of all trade routes leading to salt and gold mines.

Controlled by empires of Morrocan kings it expanded featuring products from the north and central Africa until the French occupied in in 1893.

Commercial functions were then taken over by Mopti town in the confluence of Bani and Niger rivers, in the northeast,  An agricultural trade center, Djenne boasts Muslim Architecture and a great mosque.

The great mosque built in 1905 is a classic Sahelian mud architecture.

The highlight of each year is an event when annually, the inhabitants of the town gather and refine the mud structure, giving it a new layer to replace what torrential rains fade out. The festival of plastering event: La Fete de crepissage. 

The labors of plasterers are accompanied with a beating of drums. The drums are perched on wooden spikes that stick out of the walls, serving as permanent scaffolding and decoration.

Younger girls carry bowls and buckets  of water and mud from the river bed, and older women pound millet making pancakes,

Special meals are made by each family to celebrate the occasion. Proud of their architectural heritage the people of Djenne have long resisted paved roads and any introduction of electricity.

Only a handful of cars exist in Djenne belonging mostly to government officials that run development programmes for sustainability.

All new buildings and even the hospital are built in traditional style and technique binding the river mus with straw and grass

The building material is plentiful and cheap and the clay keeps houses cool, even with the scorching hot sun outside.

Labor for repairing is becoming a challenge in present day when most move into cities with computers, email, and television.

The architectural gem receives foreign aid to maintain its splendor and keep it the same, for another two decades and more!

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Welcome!  #ExploremotherlandAfrica

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CreatePreneurAfrica -Tastebud treats from Chef Li

READY WITH A SENSATIONAL MENU  to tantalize all TASTEBUDS, meet Createpreneur Africa, Chef Li.

Linda Nirina Rojohasina Mazibuko, born in the culturally and culinary diverse island of Madagascar, eventually relocated to her father’s homeland, South Africa. Chef Li’s cooking styles from multiple influences topple divine and delectable taste sensations.

Growing up with her mother, a musician from Madagascar, and her grandmother in South Africa , her Zulu heritage was a divine fusion into the mixture of Madagascar cooking style delights.

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A member of ‘Çhefs in Africa’ she ranked amongst the top ten of Top Chefs in SA.

After graduating at a culinary art school in South Africa, she has been a key contributor to respected kitchens all over Africa. Trained by prominent chefs, she has designed delectable brands of influence.

Instagram @chefli_
Twitter @chefmazibuko
Facebook Page: ChefLi

 

1. What drives you?

The only thing that drives me is my passion. It’s the idea that food brings so much joy to the soul as well as nations together.

2. What is your true passion in life?

My true passion in life is love expressed through food and music. Every time I am in the kitchen I feel like I am creating a symphony of flavors. I like to listen to classical music while cooking. I also sing at my local church called Hillsong Johannesburg.

3. How did you find your passion? How old were you?

I found my passion for music when I was about 3 or 4 years old. My grandfather was a legendary musician in Madagascar and I used to follow him everywhere, as my mother recalls.

My passion for food started when I was about 9 years old, I used to sit in the kitchen watching my mother cook our meals. It was fascinating to me.

Eventually, she let me cook with her when I got a little bit older, surprisingly I went to WITS University after school but ended up dropping out because I couldn’t stop thinking about being a Chef. LOL! My mother was freaked out about it but my dad was very supportive.

Eventually, she began to see how I was flourishing & finally understood that this is what I was made for.

4. What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me the most is that it brings people together from all walks of life. There are no stereotypes or silly debates about it. It’s just something that makes everyone happy and brings healing to the soul.

5. What drove you to make money from your passions?

Well, it is my bread and butter, I don’t see myself slaving away behind an office desk all day so I need to cook to live. But I do this mostly out of love. Don’t let me cook for you when I am sad or depressed, it’s going to be horrible. I cook with my soul.

6. When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I was first paid when a family friend asked me to bake a cake for them.

7. What kept you going when you thought of giving up?

My one friend, Tiffany, keeps me going through her words of encouragement. She knows me so well and always knows how to get me out of the ruts I tend to put myself into (LOL). I tend to doubt myself sometimes. The last time I was about to give up, she got me back on track and then TOP CHEF SA contacted me.

8. What motivates you every day to become more successful?

What motivates me is the fact that I am the first real chef in my family. Also, because I am a mixed breed child, I have two families to make proud.

9. What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?

I don’t really have much to tell them, I like to work and produce in silence. They will just see the fruits.

10. What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

I would like to tell them to embrace and enjoy their journeys. Not everyone is going to make it in the same way, at the same time. You’re never too old or too young to start something, use what you have, the rest will follow.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

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Exploring Splendor in Tanzania – Festive Season Gift: Free Promotion

 

Thank you for your quest to join the journey and #ExploremotherlandAfrica.

 

Please feel free to download you free promotional copy from the 29 December to the 5th of January.

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CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

Cape town filmmaker, Kurt Orderson explored artistic expression in his early lifetime beginnings. After mastering crafts of his creations from his backyard in the Cape 'ghettos'(beyond Table Mountain),he ventured out into the world, rising up to becoming one of Africa's leading filmmakers.

Kurt initiated his career during his studies as a trainee at the SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), earning mere stipends for daily living expenses.

He defined his unique aesthetic voice and was soon acknowledged as a director and cinematographer on several key productions.

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He founded his independent production company, “Azania Rizing”.

“Azania Rizing” is a tool for the African diaspora to rise up and map African legacies around the world on a global storytelling platform.

His major works include:

  •  Definition of Freedom, examining the role of  Hip Hop in South Africa. It was screened at the Toronto and Vancouver  hip-hop festival  winning the best documentary award at the Atlanta Hip hop film festival
  •  Tribute to Lucky Dube, the tribute to legendary reggae artist Lucky Dube was filmed in South Africa, London, and Jamaica. It was awarded the Best Documentary  Award at the  Silicon Valley African Film Festival in  2013.
  • The Pan-African Express, a journey of six young men, students from Atlanta who travel to  South Africa and trying to understand people living with  HIV and Aids. The film was funded by The Oprah Winfrey Foundation.
  • Eldorado, a feature chronicles the journey of four friends in a Gauteng township in South Africa. It won the Special mention South Africa Feature film at the  Durban International Film Festival in 2011
  •  Breathe Again,  features Derrick Orderson, a marginalized swimmer from the  Cape Flats who rose above his livelihood in an abnormal society of inhumane prejudice. It was screened at the Encounters film festival and Durban International Film Festival and several film festivals worldwide.
  • The Prodigal Son 
  • Visibly Invisible

“The Unseen Ones”

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds” Bob Marley

Current Projects

Not in My Neighborhood explores spatial violence, current gentrification and the post-apartheid era. It compares Cape Town , Johannesburg and New York uncovering the threads that exist between people that are miles apart.

 

Picture for the documentary Not in my Neighborhood. September 2016 – São Paulo – Brazil

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#CreateoreneurAfrica – The Soul Journey of Kurt Orderson

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is ultimately the great history and achievements of Africa, and I guess also within a broad order global perspective is my people that inspire me and drive me. I am from South Africa, a very specific region in South Africa, Cape Town.

More specifically I am from a township from that is part of a strip of what would be known as the “ghettos”,  the Cape Flats, there is a rich history of storytelling, a great significance of the epicenter of what the foundation of the space, basically built on the legacy of apartheid. The legacy of architectural and apartheid spatial planning ideally separated people  (which was an actual policy with the group areas act ) that had a great significance of breaking up families, literally…… families scattered.

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I think what maintains a traditional oral form of storytelling, obviously remained significant, it inspired my body of work ultimately that’s my drive, Africa’s history, Africa’s achievements. One is inspired by  Africa’s legacy, the epicenter of academia and  Timbuktoo…storytelling and the arts and crafts of storytelling ultimately started there and spread across the globe.

My true passion….well I am very passionate about just listening, sitting and listening to people telling stories, whether happy or sad,  ultimately passion for me personally, is driven by a deep desire of wanting to change the landscape of..change  how people perceive each other. I think it’s those stories of those people who done it in the past and are still doing it, that’s what drives my passion. I am inspired by their passion, I think I apply it to my life.That for me is what passion is. Passion goes deeper, the engine or driving force for one to do something. I think ultimately wanting to do something is ultimately passion…the driving force…

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

How did I find my passion….well that’s an interesting question? I think for me when I finished high school, I was definitely inspired by the visual medium and visual arts. There was obviously the influence of television and Hollywood tv,  I guess, but also my parents influenced me.

My father was a screen printer, which is ultimately a visual artist, although he didn’t call himself that, based on conditioning of the system that shaped him, apartheid South Africa. The idea that you were limited to do certain things when it comes to art black folks were deprived in a large historical moment of what the status quo says what you do and what you can become. My father is a strong reference to creating images and applying it to a t-shirt, applies similarly script to screen.

I think its an interesting analogy, metaphor for making films, taking a rich traditional medium and applying it to my work. I think that is how I found my passion.

How old was I?   I think my first reference to start noticing…I don’t know if I can say noticing, more where I picked up the idea that I was passionate about the visual medium, I think I was maybe thirteen years old or fourteen…..

I was locked out of my parent’s house, of course. That time there were no cellphones. I’m from a family of a family of five kids, my parents both worked, I was locked out one day.  I went to the backyard, my father had a workshop in the back of the yard, and I found a hammer and flat nose screwdriver.

I used the hammer and flat nose to carve out my name on a piece of wood and was quite impressed by myself. Wow, no one before that necessarily initiated anything like that. I wasn’t exposed to artistic expression and multiple forms of what artists do, I carved out my name, varnished it and made it immaculate. Later on meeting people who carved for a profession, creating amazing things. I always reference my first carving, that was my flame of inspiration for being an artist, use a visual medium for storytelling.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What about my passionate appeals to me the most… I guess the privilege to being a filmmaker, that being my passion but also to add to that, I feel very blessed to basically get paid for my passion, for my hobby… I would say …because we love film so much I  will do it for free, that’s how deep our passion for cinema lies…and getting paid to do something you love, your passion is a heavy blessing.

What appeals to me most is the idea of  shared history and shared knowledge, when someone allows you into their household to tell you their stories…. you being inspired and, relating on a level of  “oh I knew someone who had a similar idea about this or that .”

 I think that is what the driving force is …..sharing communal space, sharing narratives, sharing stories,  sharing politics, sharing knowledge….that for me a strong appeal to my passion…

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money out of my passion…well you know in real talk, not to romanticize the question too much. We, unfortunately, live in a very capitalist society, we inherited capitalism,, were born into a capitalistic society…..that on one level, right,, that reality of things, we need to eat right, we need to sustain ourselves… in terms of monetary exchange we apple or tomato,whatever……what well I just realised that my craft, my talent, my blessing, I can get paid for it.

For me, there was a strong driving force around craft, like crafting what is my voice, what is my aesthetic, what does Kurt bring across in a common sharing space as a filmmaker as a storyteller. It was first defining my voice, after defining that idea, that is when I felt to make money.

People  want to hire you, because they want that aesthetic that you ideally represent, that was my passion for making art and getting paid for my art, as an independent filmmaker, as an African filmmaker, things are rough out there…and we want to tell our own stories on our own terms, the system itself makes it very difficult for us to sustain ourselves. I need to work like a plumber who works with tools and I need to buy those tools. That is the reality of things

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

The first time I got paid for something… I can’t recall exactly when that was when that moment was…there was a few moment I think. I think  I worked on a television show and I was a contestant, but I also worked on a show. It was a show on SABC2, I was like 18 or 19.

We were trainees and there was a little  stipend that they paid us for traveling money or whatever. It was for generic work on set like organizing cables and assisting the floor, production. I remember very little , but that’s when I realised you can get paid for this. I was still studying at that time as well.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going. I have come through multiple crossroads moments asking myself is this really sustainable, what I do, filmmaking? Filmmaking is really hard, difficult, expensive artistic form to choose. A painter can get some canvas and some paints  make a  killer piece, get to an art market  for a million and boom there we go

For filmmakers, the reality of getting a camera, getting all the equipment you need, and then on top of it, getting a team to operate the tools, that’s a whole process on its own. These things are hard when you off the grid and not part of the mainstream in the system and don’t necessarily want to be part of it.

That’s a very conscious choice, you can just join tv and become a commissioning editor, produce for television and things will be different, it will be a completely different narrative, everything is there,, there is funding for you and they hire you.

Food, clothes and shelter have no politics.

Mutabaruka

As an independent filmmaker or producer, it is very difficult… I only recently mastered the art form of really raising money for my films, for many years my films were independent, self-funded at times.

Now its like I understand more about the industry, how to write the right proposals, and apply to the right people and getting the money and managing the money.

When you at the lowest moment at the crux, paying rent, paying teams, paying crews, and rejections. Rejection is a big thing for filmmakers , filmmakers are sensitive beings, we are fragile as well  in this…. broken world

These are all the challenges that come on your journey, it applies to life as well… life ain’t easy.  The world is not nice, the world is cruel, the life we find peace and sanity within ourselves, the people close to you. There are your therapists, they are your motivational speakers, they push you and say we believe in you, that’s what keeps me going.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 

What motivates me to be successful, what motivation every day. Whats the motivation?  I think this idea that, on one level is that  African history, African stories were for the longest time ever was told through the voice of the colonizer and the aesthetic and the lens of the colonizer…..

These were told in a biased fashion…for me now, as a fellow African filmmaker, it is our duty. I feel strongly for film to be part of the restoration process, the healing journey that we are experiencing and going through as black people across the globe and the trauma that we collectively experience.

How do we heal? What are the healing mechanisms? Now to be honest with you, we don’t have a clear answer to that question. I feel collective communal sharing through a  very powerful visual medium like television or film, then you can project to the rest of the world and share that and say in order for us to be this idea of one world and one shared history.

Everyone has to have the opportunity to share their stories through there own  POV or point of view,  I think that’s powerful ways of sharing. We all have common stories. We share a common history of people all over the world which ultimately makes us human.

Every generation blames the generation before them.

 

Racial ideas and ideology, culture and religion etcetera, are just all divisive mechanisms put in place for a form divide, rule and conquer….not to be cliched,  we have the same blood and all of that. I have transformed, transgressed that phase. I have passed that idea

Anger is fine. Anger is important. We have to be angry. We can’t all just hear  I am sorry and forgive right now,

What if I don’t want to forgive you right, now, and maybe  I want to make a film about that as part of the idea of forgiveness, as collective forgiveness.

That makes film become an interesting mechanism and medium, for multiple purposes. I feel,  personally, we can use film a methodology of social healing for healing the self and healing communities.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

What I have to say about all the people who doubted me…interesting question.  I always think about, one person comes to mind, a schoolteacher.

I wasn’t necessarily the greatest student, to be honest in high school.  I  probably could have done more. I was like, reckless and mischievous. I would say, I gave a lot of trouble.

Was I a rebel? Not sure, I don’t want to throw those words around. One teacher just didn’t like me. I was thinking about her the other day,

I think you always doubted me, I don’t think you ever believed in me, and now that my work is out there in the mainstream? I wonder if she saw my name out there. I wonder what she would think, after seeing what I had done.

I don’t want to reference people that doubted me.  I am not going to make a film for people. I make films am driven to or inspired to make. I don’t care about whether people agree with my standpoint, I love those who love me on the real level, beyond blood, blood relatives. My family is universal.  I am very blessed. We share this brokenness.As a broken people, we come together and we form this path of healing, the heal of our wounds….

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

What advice do I give to those aspiring creatives that look up to me?

The advice ideally would be to always use motivation. The idea of keeping it moving or just do it.  Life is about the idea of inspiring the other, inspiring other people. I think for me,  that is what life is about. Me inspiring other people and continuing the human change of inspiration.

One has to know your craft, know your blessing, identify your blessing.  But also knowing that this is a  very complicated world that we living in. There will be multiple stumbling blocks with a lot of us.  You carrying the torch, you carrying the great torch of your ancestors. You dont have a choice  , you have to keep that torch alight. That is the flame, the driving force, the fuel.

More important is to have a voice. Have a political voice. I don’t mean party politics.  Having a geopolitical view of the world and its complexities. An understanding of global politics. Deciphering the bullshit of what the news tells you, projecting that in your work. Be that change you ultimately want to see.

What you see is what you see. What you know is different

Mutabaruka

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Slavery is not African history. Slavery interrupted African history.

Mutabaruka

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Island of Madagascar- Lalah Raindimby

#CreatePreneurAfrica came into contact with Lalah Raindimby , a second generation musical gem ,  a native of Madagascar, she hails from the southeastern portion of the Island country in an area called Fianarantsoa.

 

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She is from the ethnic Betsileo group in that country.

Betsileo are widely known for their special artistic creativity with own traditional dialect called Horija Betsileo.

 

Lalah is the second generation musician and vocalist being the daughter of region’s Famous legendary artist Known as Raindimby.

 

 

Raindimby is credited with making this unique form of music widely known throughout the country and beyond the borders of Madagascar.

 

LALAH,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My true passion is my music. For me, music is a means of expression of life as a human being. Performing the folk and cultural music of my homeland allows me to keep my heritage close to me and to build upon the legacy of my dad and other noted performers of his generation. The music gives me motivation and strength in life.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
At a very young age, I think I was six years old when I observed my dad and other family members rehearsing for a performance in the house.  

I began to sing. By the time I was a teenager my dad invited me on stage to perform with him.  I joined him on many occasions and found that performing was enjoyable and the audience response was encouraging.

From that time until the present music has been a critical part of my life. My first love and my passion.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
I find that when I am engaged with the music I become spiritually transformed and purely focused on my music and forget about the troubles of the world.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
As a teenager performing with my father and realizing that my father was singing as professional and making money from his performance that he shared with me and I realize in addition being spiritually gratifying I could make money as a professional singer.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
As a teenager performing with my dad.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The memory of my late father and reflecting on the sacrifice that he made to expose the musical tradition Horija Betsileo of our people to the entire country and beyond.
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I have in effect become an Ambassador to keep that musical and cultural tradition alive and pass it on to the next generation.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I must continue to strive in those ideas which are dear to me and I cannot allow them to stop me from perusing my goals and dreams.
 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Well, you are going to face lots of challenges but don’t give up on your dreams and your passion, just believe in yourself and work hard to achieve the goals you have set for yourself.

Music by Lalah Raindimby

Lalah Raindimy Soul Sounds

Get ready for Right Brain Marketing- CreateprenuerAfrica# ,starting up in the southern region of Africa!

 

Gifts From the Motherland of Africa

Get ready for sights, insights, and reviews from the continent of Africa and make your expedition of exploration unforgettable.

The festive season has arrived. The time has arrived to reach dreams of a lifetime.

It may be that well-deserved break , gathering special gifts and preparing for a brand new life chapter in the new year.

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1. Find the best affordable lights to suit you. Make your way to the motherland continent of Africa and  reach every desired destination too!

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2.  Gather your resources and build your library. Yours forever to savour and prepare to return!

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3. Find the best accommodation

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3.Get into the sound rhythym and tunes of Africa

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4. Get ready to savour delicious delights. Stir the pot!

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If you reach South Africa ,landing in Johannesburg,get a LYNNSPOT VEGAN MEAL COUPON
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5. Ready for art collections?

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6. Share the Light. Light up the candle from Africa!

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8. Classic African Shoe style


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8.  Shirts from Africa

 

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Miracle plants in the Namib Desert of Africa

 

There are miracle plants of the Namib desert have perfected survival in the harsh conditions of the desert.

Welwitschia mirabilis 

 

This plant is really amazing. It has two leaves, a stem, and a  root base. The leaves grow on opposite sides and continue growing never dropping. They tear from the wind and get browned by the sun, looking like individual leaves.

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The stem thickens and grows and may reach six feet in height and twenty-four feet in width. Corn like flowers appears at when the plant reaches 20 years. 100 flowers are produced by the female plant, the male produces pollen abundance and the lifespan of the plant can reach an estimated 2000 years.

The plant was named after the medical doctor who discovered it. Friedrich Welwitschia in the year 1860. He intended to give it an Angolan native name ‘Tumboa’, but the plant was named in honor of him.  Mirabilis means wonderful or marvelous in Latin

Described as ‘the platypus of the plant kingdom by Charles Darwin the plant is considered as a living fossil. It masters life in the hot and dry desert where other plants will not survive

The plant is endemic to the Namib desert in Namibia as well as Southern Angola. It is Namibia’s national plant. The rugby team in Namibia carried its name as well.  Mirabilis means marvelous in Latin It is a “living fossil.”

Initially, sightings of the plant are not impressive, especially when they are small. The leaves are a pale green and the plant seems to be dead.

A 1500-year-old giant welwitschia is a popular tourist attraction. There is one  50 kilometers east in  Swakopmund on the coast of the Atlantic ocean.  It is about 1500 years old and almost as tall as a human being. It is fenced to keep away trampling feet from the sensitive root system.

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Researchers in the Namib Desert have concluded that the moisture capturing is because of fog. Fog keeps the fine root of the Welwitschia’s fine roots. The Namib desert is characterized by fog.

The formation of the fog is when the humid masses if air meets the cold current of the Benguela and the fog  is blown inland

Welwitschia has two leaves that continue growing at 0.37 mm each day of its life. The patient Plant sits and waits for better conditions. A lesson for us humans indeed,

Welwitschia mirabilis, male plant (on the left) and female plant (on the right)
Male Welwitschia – Left Female Welwitschia – Right

Welwitschia also adjusts the color of leaves. When very hot, there are more red pigments,  that protect the plant from the radiation of the sun. When water is readily available and temperatures drop the leaves chlorophyll, a green pigment that conducts photosynthesis.

The Nara plant

Nara Plant

The  Nara plant (Acanthosicyos horridus). grows exclusively in the Namib desert, The leaves prevent water loss and photosynthesis is conducted through the spines and green stems Moisture is absorbed from surrounding fog,

The plant also absorbs moisture from fog directly through its stems. These plants grow on sand dunes and middle desert.Interestingly, these plants created the dunes.

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The Nara plants growing on the ground, accumulate sand that the wind blows in. The lower end of the plant covered in sand dies an provides nutrients to other parts of the plant. The new plant grows above the previous one. The height of the Nara plant accumulates an addition of sand, forming the dune

 This is how it works: Nara plants growing on the ground accumulate sand around them, blown in by the wind. The lower part of the plant, which is covered in sand, eventually dies, providing nutrients for other parts of the plant. New plant parts then grow on top of the old one. The Nara plant gains height as a result, accumulating more sand and forming dunes. The plants reach heights of 3meters

The Nara plant produces tasty desert fruit. Melons that grow as large as ostrich eggs.

The water-rich food is a great food source for animals and people. The native ethnic group, the TopNaar people harvest the melons on a seasonal basis. They eat the fruit and sell the seeds for producing cosmetics for their rich omega oil composition.

The exclusive Namib desert plants like the Nara and Welwitschia sustain their long life by adjusting to the environment.

Welcome #Exploremotherland Africa

Do not doubt: Women narrate the future! “Shining the light of literature in Africa”

Africa, the heartbeat of rhythmic narrative voices, the home of authentic root information, is on a mission to reshape its distorted, desecrated image. Words spark off like distant echoes healing scars inflicted by the wraths of colonialism.

From rhythmic poetry to reciting kings, the pulsating echo from the motherland of Africa in streams of African literature is rooted in oral tradition, moral values, cultural systems and laws that were passed on from wood fires in the villages spreading voices to be heard, passing through the rivers and mountains.

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The Diverse Literature of Africa

Writers from the continent in the contemporary era bring a diverse perspective of the multifaceted and complex continent of Africa.

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Wole Soyinka from Nigeria spread the wings of Africa literature awareness and development after claiming the Nobel prize in 1986. Magical extraordinaire from Africa followed with Ben Okri and ‘The Famished Road’. The enchanting tale from Africa in a magical tone of realism and claimed the poetic prose Booker prize in 1991.

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Somalian novelist, Nuruddin Farah received the 1998 Neustadt Prize prize. Nigerian author emerged with ‘Measuring time’ and Mozambican Mia Couto’s lyrically delicious read  “The Last Flight of the Flamingo” took off in a magic realism masterpiece of note.

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Sembene, Achebe, Hampâté Bâ, Kourouma, Marechera and Armah dominated the literary scene,  then came the flowing voices of women in Africa with Mariama Ba and Bessie Head who pioneered African feminism.

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 The Literary Voice of Women from Africa

The last two and a half decades women writers came to the fore. From the classic ‘Nervous conditions” by Zimbabwean Tsitsi Dangaremba to  Cameroon’s Calixthe Beyal, showcased women from Africa that excel in literature.

Nervous Conditions -Tsitsi Dangaremba

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Calixthe Beyala : La Plantation

 

Female writers came to the forefront like Fatou Diome, the acclaimed ‘The Belly of the Atlantic’ author.

The autobiographic ‘The Devil that Danced on the Water’ announced Aminatta Forna another great writer from the land of  Sierra Leone, home of Syl Cheney-Coker, an acclaimed poet.

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A young girl from Nigeria, ‘Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’ made her debut on the literary scene taking the world by storm with ‘Purple Hibiscus’.  ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’ followed, an epic of the Nigerian civil war.

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Amma Darko, a tax collector expanded her creativity in Africa’s expression in the linguistic field. She published (Der VerkaufteTraum) Beyond The Horizon

Amma Darko – Beyond the horizon

Monica Arac de Nyeako from Uganda claimed the 2007 Caine Prize.

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The past ten years have seen the emergence of publishing houses and broadened our understanding of the savannah. The diverse narrative from Africa continues globe trotting.

The internet has widened pathways for authors to circumnavigate the traditional publishing house methods, earn revenue and create online fans. EC Osunde proved this after winning the 2009 Caine Prize for initially published on Guernicamag.com.

The Caine Prize has provided a recognition for African writing in an annual platform to ensure the development of writing on the continent.

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Binyavanga Wainaina, after winning the  Caine Prize in 2002  initialises, Kwani,  a  literary review in Africa. The infrastructure of African writing continues to develop with new publishing houses and the information exchange online of databases and African studies as well as social networks like twitter transcend all publishing barriers giving a Voice to Africa.

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The Colonial Linguistic barriers  dividing  Africa – reinforced

The question of language was always debated regarding the logic of English in literature writing in indigenous languages grew

Ngugi Wa Thiong’   wrote his novels ‘Devil on the Cross’ and ‘Matigari’ in Kikuyu and abandoned English, the language of colonizers.  ‘Devil on the Cross’ was successful in sales and emerged with 50,000 sold copies.The landmark of indigenous language in African literature.

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Linguistic barriers perpetuate the divisions rooted in colonialism preventing literature from Africa to become cohesive in a movement of Pan Africanism.The Uk celebrates English writers from Africa, France endorsed authors in Francophone brackets from Mali Senegal and Côte d’Ivoire.

Translations do exist, but it is common for intellectuals to get sponsored by ex-colonies. Further investment in translation in the core for Pan Africa readership and appreciation. Established pan African faculties may be the key to resolving the challengeThe challenge of building local markets and readership remains. The selection of a book in the country’s national curriculum can guarantee sales. Sales need buying power and literature is not prioritized as many live in poverty.

The selection of a book in the country’s national curriculum can guarantee sales. Sales need buying power and literature is not prioritized as many live in poverty. Writings contrast the picture of Africa as a continent of darkness and delusion with narrative posing the eclectic and fruitful real Africa.

The call for Africa to rephrase history had arrived in 1986 when Wole Soyinka took center stage as the dramatist in poetic overtones. Exposing corruption and political injustice was no smooth flowing route, -yet the mission to fade away the myth of  Africa being incapable contributes to the need for Africa writing.

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Welcome : Explore the World in Africa

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

 

SOUTH AFRICAN LEGEND TU NOKWE @ JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL-MOROGORO ,TANZANIA

Alight, Arise and Shine. Tu Nokwe in Tanzania

At the recent festival in Morogoro, Tanzania, festival organisers were delighted when the legendary  Tu Nokwe, the Light of Africa made her way from South Africa to share her light and lead pathways to soul emancipation.

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Join our Journey- Coming Soon- News and Reviews JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL, Morogoro, Tanzania

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Join us on the journey, news, reviews and updates from the JUU African festival.

 

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