Malawi -The Warm Heart of Africa

Hundreds of miles of tropical golden sand beaches line this tideless inland sea. Relax in the sun on an uncrowded beach with long stretches of totally uninhabited golden sand lakeshore

Malawi's vast variety, overwhelming friendliness  great lake, wildlife, landscape and culture makes it an ideal getaway for families.

Formally known as Nyasaland, it's surrounded by Mozambique,Zambia, and Tanzania.

Malawi Flag

 


The initial western inception was when David Livingstone entered the shores in 1859. A British wiped out  slave trade in 1891.

For such a small country it has an unrivalled combination of Lake, Landscape and Wildlife. From rugged highlands to lowland plains, Malawi has an incredible variety of stunning landscapes.

The unique rolling hills of orchid-clad Nyika; the cool forested plateau of Zomba; the 10000 ft climbers’ paradise of Mulanje Massif; the broad and fertile Shire Valley.

Malawi means the “glitter of the sun rising across the lake”.  And this vast inland sea is what we think about when we think about Malawi.

Lake Malawi is the third-largest lake in Africa, the 10th largest in the world and covers 1/5th of Malawi. It’s sometimes called the Calendar Lake because it’s 365 miles long and 52 miles wide.

 

Or find out more about the country. Karonga has an interesting but turbulent history as a centre for the notorious nineteenth-century slave trade.

 

 

Now the town is the site of a new museum focused on both its cultural history and the recent archaeological finds of dinosaur and hominid bones.

At the top of the northerly point of the lake, you will find Nkhata Bay, that was reached by  David Livingstone. Its small sheltered harbour is a focus for the Lake’s fishing industry but it is also becoming increasingly important as a tourist centre.

Bandawe Mission was the place that Dr Robert Laws made the second attempt to establish a Livingstonia Mission. Like Cape Maclear, malaria took its toll and the missionaries moved further north to the present site on the Kondowe Plateau. The banked seating and  lateral sided pulpit of the church and missionary graves remain

 

Off the eastern shore of the Lake is Likoma Island: a small piece of Malawi in Mozambican waters. This is where the headquarters of Livingstone’s mission to Central Africa in the 1880s.  That’s why Malawi kept it when the Lake was divided politically after World War II. Likoma’s claim to fame is its cathedral (the size of Winchester’s) started in 1903. This vast building is a small piece of England in Africa, including stained glass and carved soapstone.

That’s why Malawi kept it when the Lake was divided politically after World War II. Likoma’s claim to fame is its cathedral (the size of Winchester’s) started in 1903. This vast building is a small piece of England in Africa, including stained glass and carved soapstone.

Visit the world’s first freshwater national park. Lake Malawi National Park, close to Monkey Bay, lies towards the southern extremity of the lake. The park includes a land area around the cape and bay as well as the Lake and islands up to 100 metres offshore. It’s also a world heritage site.

Snorkelling and scuba-diving are increasingly popular here because of the attraction of seeing the brilliantly coloured fish, the mbuna.

Lake Malawi contains more fish than any other lake in the world. Some of the rarest tropical fish in the world are unique to this vast lake. it has about 1000 species of fish. It’s is a true kaleidoscopic aquarium.

The countless thousands of freshwater fish, the mbuna, are more abundant and varied than anywhere else in the world and will feed directly from the hand.

Marine animals include two species of otter and occasional crocodiles.

Away from the lake, the park has baboons, klipspringer, bushbuck and vervet monkeys, antelope and hyrax, and, of course, there is a great variety of birdlife including fish eagles, kingfishers, cormorants and hamerkops. In the North the

In the North the lake is quite extraordinarily deep: 700m, plunging well below sea level. This reflects the enormity of the natural faulting of the Great Rift Valley which is the origin of the Lake itself.

Try out the range of watersports available along the length of Lake Malawi. Swimming, waterskiing, sailing and kayaking are all available along the extraordinarily clear lakeshore.

Because of its rich harvest of fish, the Lake plays an important part in the country’s economy. Fishing villages are scattered along the length of the lakeshore and you’re welcome to visit the traditional industry. Go fishing on the southern lakeshore north of Mangochi and at Senga Bay. There are opportunities to fish for yellow fish, lake salmon and lake tiger. Trout angling is easily arranged at Nyika Plateau or  Chelinda as well as Zomba Plateau.

Go fishing on the southern lakeshore north of Mangochi and at Senga Bay. There are opportunities to fish for yellow fish, lake salmon and lake tiger. Trout angling is easily arranged at Nyika Plateau or  Chelinda as well as Zomba Plateau.

Mumbo Island and Domwe Island camps offer idyllic island getaways. Malawi is an ideal destination not to be missed in Africa. #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

#ExploreMotherlandAfrica

In Memory of Willian G Robertson. Special Thanks to the Freeway Tours Team, Julie Hall,Thandi Brewer,Leslie Fong,Jerry Mofokeng,Momo Matsunyane

WELCOME TO JUU AFRIKAN FESTIVAL

The Light Of Africa – Ready to Shine at the JUU Afrikan Festival,Tanzania2017

 

Travellers tell us about your experiences and recommendation

 

 

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

Top 10 Mozambique Mouthwatering Munches

Mozambique, the tropical paradise of Southern Africa has gorgeous beaches, beautiful islands and turquoise sea with a palm lined coastline.

A land of tropical fruit, abundant seafood and fish and a Portuguese taste influence is a heaven for foodies.

Piri Piri (peri-peri)  is part and parcel of all Mozambican cuisine. It is used in every marinade and also a common option for french fries or rice.

1. Matapa


Mozambique Matapa

Not common on tourist restaurant menus, Matapa is a traditional dish. You will be more than likely to come across if visiting locals. It is made with stewed cassava leaves, ground peanuts and garlic and coconut milk. It is eaten either on its own or accompanied by sumptuous prawns and rice.

2.     Prawns

Juicy fresh, flavourful prawns are the highlight of Mozambique delights. They are served fried, grilled in peri peri or tossed with garlic with rice of French fries.

3.    Coconut rice

Coconut Rice

Coconut rice is common in  Mozambique, fluff rice made in coconut milk. Perfect to compliment Mozambique spicy and hot delights.

4. Paõ

Pao

Paõ  are Portuguese bread rolls baked in  villages in ovens that are wood fired

5.    Curry

Mozambique flavours and tastes of curry are unlike Thai or Indian food but distinctly unique in a special taste of local spices. It is served with chicken or prawns.

6. Peri peri chicken

Peri Peri chicken is common in Mozambique and other parts of Southern Africa with Portuguese influences. It consists of marinated chicken in lemon juice and a generous dose of peri peri sauce and served with French fries.

8. Prego roll

Prego roll

A roadside Mozambique snack is prego rolls. Steak covered in fiery chilli vinegar and garlic sauce wrapped in paõ. Simply delicious

 8. Cashews

Once the largest cashew producers, cashews grow all over Mozambique. They are sold at cheap prices at every street corner and the beach. Plain and delightfully tasty peri peri flavours are tastebud sensational tinglers.

9. Fish

Fresh fish all along the Mozambique coast is available all the time for a perfect barbecued or grilled seaside meal

10. Tropical fruit

The humid warm Mozambique climate brings out simply delicious tropical fruit al over. Coconuts, papaya, avocados and sweet mangoes.

Welcome  #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

Durban – The Zulu Kingdom in South Africa

  • Townships are the heartbeat of South Africa

The province of Kwa Zulu Natal provides opportunities to experience African culture in authentic first hand Zulu township and cultural tours.


Durban
  • Facts about township matters

The cultural rich etiquette of the soul of South Africa in townships can hardly be rivalled.

Township tours in Durban weave into the rhymes which were pathways for leaders like Nelson Mandela and Mahatma Gandhi. And an adventure to remember with an unforgettable ‘Shisanyama” (barbecue) mouth watering feast.

 

  • Townships were initially established under apartheid rule.
  • Non-whites were forbidden to own or live in property in exclusively designated white areas and confined to underdeveloped settlements.

 

Townships are this day and age are predominantly black or non-white people. Since democracy, the settlements have been developed and upgraded. They are now kaleidoscope suburbs capturing the essence of resilient people. The social vibe and energy is the hub of creativity and small businesses.

Kwamashu

The oldest township in KZN is KwaMashu. Renowned for ethnic arts scene a tour in the mesmerizing location captures the essence of unique culture with a flair.

  • Experience life of KwaMashu residents and the neighbouring townships of Ntuzuma and Inanda. Get into the vibe and release into contemporary Kwaito style dance moves or varieties of hip hop and pantsula.
  • Get into the art vibe with drama performances and Mashkandi, the traditional music of the Zulu.
  • Experience herbalists and healers

Feel the spirit of true  ‘Ubuntu’, the spirit if humanity in Umlazi the second largest South African township

Umlazi epitomises  “African-ness” with its pulsating energy and vibrant culture.

Feel, taste and see  the spirit of Africa in true essence

In 1967, The National Party established it as a black township. In this day Umlazi has emerged into a buzzing township in South Africa filled with shebeens, ”Shisanyama” as well as jazz venues, popular for international tourists.

 

Welcome to township treats of note. #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

Côte d’Ivoire – Tropical Paradise

Africa, the motherland has loads to offer and Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) is one of them

There are two different names of the country used in media.  Ivory Coast is the English version whereas  Côte d'Ivoire is the French version.


In 1985 the official name changed from the English version to the current French version and became internationally branded as such.

Côte d’Ivoire! A must see tropical paradise wonder. Côte d’Ivoire is a true stunner, filled with starfish sands, forests of palm trees, and bronze like roads

There are three ecosystems in the land area. The South consists of a coastal strip bordering the Gulf of Guinea.

 

 

 

The territory  is occupied by forests, and the North consists of large open areas of Savannah conducive to farming

Côte d’Ivoire has two official capitals. Yamoussoukro the political and administrative capital, and the country’s 4th largest city. Abidjan is the economic capital and is officially listed in guidebooks.

The economic progress is evident in modern life and culture while managing to hold true identity. Unlike other traditional African countries, the economy in the Ivory Coast economy is advanced and developed.

The country serves as the largest exporters of cocoa and produces coffee beans.

Parc National de Taï in the south offers a Safari experience with hidden secrets and chimps under tree boughs cracking nuts .hides secrets, species and nut-cracking chimps under the boughs of its trees, while the peaks and valleys of Man offer a highland climate, fresh air and fantastic hiking opportunities through tropical forests.

The valleys and peaks offer fresh air and highland climate with opportunities to hike through the tropical forests.

Grand Bassam and Assinie are beach resorts for perfect weekend retreats of blue heavens.

 

Côte d’Ivoire  experiences tropical weather along the coast and semi-arid in Northerly regions, staying dry and warm and hot and wet from June until October. . and wet from June to October.

The culturally diverse Côte d’Ivoire  has five ethnic groups.The majority is the Akan group which constitutes of about 42% of the population.

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica

 

 

The other side of Cape Town-‘Township Vibes’

 

The township reflects joy in freedom, human rights, justice and reconciliation. From shebeens to sangomas, a township visit is a unique, emotional and sensory experience abuzz with vivid social culture. Each township tells its own story about its establishment, its struggle through the apartheid years and its current situation.

A township tour can be one of the most illuminating and life affirming experiences you’ll ever have.

 

Down the road from Cape Town, with its magnificent beaches and world-class restaurants, warm African hospitality awaits in a bustling environment that few visitors to the city ever experience. An offering of an authentic taste of South African Township life leaves and adventurous traveller a unique experience.

B&B accommodation in townships has bright, cheerfully decorated rooms with a strong African Flavour.  Meals at this unpretentious focus on traditional Xhosa dishes.

Gugulethu, Cape Flats

Gugulethu ‘Gugs‘, – our pride -is one of the oldest black townships in South Africa and one of the most energetic and fastest developing.

Gugulethu was established in 1958 because of the migrant labour system. It grew as the number of migrant workers from the Transkei increased and Langa became too small.

It was originally named Nyanga West,  rooms were allocated in hostels, where three men had to share a tiny room.These were times when poverty, oppression and overcrowding were the order of the day under apartheid rule.

The hostels were for men only, no wives were allowed to visit their husbands. Women were left behind in the former Transkei and Ciskei homelands. The hostels remain the oldest buildings in Gugulethu.

In our present day, ‘Gugs’ is a mixture of former hostels and tin shacks, people built for privacy, as well as  brick and mortar houses in the wealthier ranks

‘Gugs’ is a vibrant, thriving community reflecting all classes of South African society. Soak up hot, township jazz at the Uluntu Community Centre, shop at NY1s Eyona Shopping Centre or watch boxing at the Indoor Sports Stadium on NY1.

‘Gugs’ was the first black township to have an information technology centre. Ikhwezi (the star) Community centre is situated just next to the Yellow Door jazz club in NY-3. The centre provides top class training in multimedia and youth development programs. The area has a sports field, community centres and schools.

Eyona Shopping Centre, Gugulethu has the Ubuntu arts promotion and Cyn Catering service situated at the Yellow Door Jazz Café. It is popular for its drama, art and craft stalls, marimba music and top class jazz.

Sivuyile – we are happy – is the tourism information centre in Gugulethu. It opened an art and craft shop in 1999 and assists college art, students and local artist. It also serves as a photographic gallery. Young artists in the community produce sculptures, ceramics, beadwork, traditional clothing and textiles.

The Link, the first independent Black township newspaper in Cape Town, founded in 1997, has its offices in the Sivuyele College.

The best way to experience ‘Gugs’ is to go and see for yourself.

The Direct Action Centre for Peace and Memory (DACPM) in Woodstock runs history and memory excursions and trains former freedom fighters to become excursion facilitators and take visitors to sites that are etched into South African memories: District Six, the Trojan Horse Memorial in Athlone, Langa and the Gugulethu Seven. The excursions have opened up spaces for freedom fighters to start the process of healing and reconstruction.

The tours also create the opportunity for others to listen, interact and understand what so many went through during the liberation struggle and the struggle of today: the struggle for jobs. Most stories that are told are very individual, very personal. And -also important- they are told with dignity.”

Gugulethu Seven Memorial

But the highlight of any trip to ‘Gugs’must be the Gugulethu Seven Memorial

On 3 March 1986, seven young activists were ambushed in a roadblock set up by police in NY-1 Street. The “Gugulethu Seven” as they are known, is one of the most callous examples of security forces operations. Built to commemorate their death, the Gugulethu Seven Memorial was sculpted by South African artists Donovan Ward and Paul Hendricks. The sculpture stands close to where the seven were murdered.

The cut-outs project onto the road surface in a play of sunlight and shadow that brings them back to life.

The work not only commemorates death but life and nation building – it combines elements of ruin or incompleteness with parts that seem to have just been constructed. It was unveiled in March 2000 on Human Rights Day.

Feel the township vibes in South Africa #Explore MotherlandAfrica

 

Swaziland


The Kingdom of Swaziland may be the southern hemispheres smallest country, nevertheless,it has the most stunning landscapes and unique traditions with a wide array of hotels, lodges and prolific birdlife.

 

Swaziland: Landlocked with the Mozambique border on the east and surrounded by South Africa.

 

Swaziland is the ideal gateway to the Kruger National Park and KwaZulu Natal, Maputo and Johannesburg. The advantage of this route is the discovery of a new country with Africa tradition and Swazi Culture.

Our small Swaziland is an exciting destination with a range of outlets with arts and crafts as well as traditional markets. For safari enthusiasts, there is the Mkhaya Game Reserve as well as the Milwane Wildlife Sanctuary.

For safari enthusiasts, there is the Mkhaya Game Reserve as well as the Milwane Wildlife Sanctuary. For adventure seekers, there is white water rafting down the  Great  Usutu River of Swaziland- the ultimate rush!  No experience is required and you are in with trained guides leading the way.

Swaziland Cultural Soul Events

Mantenga Cultural village is located in the Mantenga Falls Nature reserve. The lush setting gives visitors an opportunity to blend in with traditional harmonies and tune into energetic dance performances.

After the show, get ready to tour the 1850’s in a reconstructed Swazi hut village. Local guides take you through each huts sharing information on customs, traditional die as well as family structure. The Mantenga Waterfall is nearby the village.

If you happen to be in Swaziland around end August do not miss out on the Umhlanga Reed Dance you shouldn’t pass up the opportunity to see it for yourself. The 8-day event takes place when the mature reeds are ready for harvest.

It is a time when young childless and unwed girls pay homage to the ‘Indlovukazi’, the Queen Mother. Before the event starts, girls from all over Swaziland arrive and are mentored and looked after, by Royal family appointed captains.

The ritual involves young girls cutting the reeds and carrying them to the royal residence.The reeds are used as perimeter windbreakers. The ceremony promotes solidarity between them.  On the seventh day, there is the participation of the King and it is a national holiday. The arena filled in thousands on a special day to view dancing and salting the Queen Mother. A fascinating cultural event in Africa!

On the seventh day, there is the participation of the King and it is a national holiday. The arena filled in thousands on a special day to view dancing and salting the Queen Mother. A fascinating cultural event in Africa!

Shewula Mountain Camp Swaziland eco-tourism attraction that is community owned. Shewula Mountain Camp offers tourism where tourists get to know local communities partaking in village walks, witnessing traditional dancing and music performances and also visiting a  traditional healer, or enjoying the tranquility of natural surroundings.

If you would like to experience a night in a rustic setting, Shewula has  single as well as family sized huts, hot showers and sumptuous home made meals prepared with local organic produce.

Swaziland Safari

Any trip to Swaziland is incomplete without a visit to the Hlane Royal National Park, the largest game park in Swaziland. It is home to elephant, leopard, rhino and lion. There are healthy populations of hippos and giraffe, zebra, crocodile, bird species and others.

In the  Siswati language, “Hlane” is Wilderness. The atmosphere is interrupted only with camera clicking and humming game vehicles.

Book in at the Ndlovu Camp overlooking a watering hole that is frequented by elephants and the white rhino.Meals are taken care of as well as game drives.

 Mkhaya and  Mlilwane Wildlife Sanctuary are the other big Swaziland game parks.  Located in the south east  Mkhaya is a  safari destination for overnight stays and day tours.
The wildlife consist of giraffe, rhino, antelope, sable and buffalo. The Stone Camp cottages have wildlife viewing opportunities from the comfort of the bed!
At the Lubombo Mountain foothills, the Mbuluzi Game Reserve has rocky outcrops, grass fields and dense forests with river bank terrains.
There are marked walking paths as well as self-driving trails, bird hides and hiking.
There is a choice of rustic campsites and  luxury lodges complete kitchens that are fully equipped  and enough space for whole families

 The Arts of Swaziland

Ngwenya Glass is a prestigious Swaziland glass factory.   Art galleries and airport shops worldwide feature Ngwenya pieces. When in Swaziland you get wholesale prices on signature marevellous works.

Using age old techniques of glass blowing,  various pieces are created from decor bowls and wine glasses exquisite corporate gifts and glowing chess sets.

Visitor get to watch the process of glass blowing

Art galleries and airport shops worldwide have  Ngwenya pieces  and you can get items at wholesale prices while in Swaziland

The Swazi Candles Craft Market showcases colorful paraffin wax candles and other gifts and beauty products. The hand molded candles have standard and animal shapes.The lively patterns and designs make the perfect souvenirs.

There are wood carvings in the complex and other items at the crafts centre comprise of batik prints, woven baskets, jewellery and carved masks.

Have at Blast from the Top of the Past

Sibebe Rock is the second largest granite dome in the world. Ten kilometres from the Mbabane, the capital city, the magnitude can be experienced at the base but those daring to hike up to the top can do so as well. Sibebe is  over 3 billion years old.

Join and feel the beat of Swaziland. #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Reaching The Highest Point in Africa – Mount Kilimanjaro

My venture into East Africa, Tanzania was a mind plan for many years and the biggest drawing card? ….Mount Kilimanjaro -  The magnetising realm of the highest mountain on the motherland continent of Africa and the highest free standing mountain on earth! The gratifying feeling of being on the top of your world.

Not on the best fitness enthusiast level and having embarked on a raw food lifestyle many around me regarded the Kilimanjaro plan mystifying and found no reason or logic to withstand reaching the risk of a peak.

Until it is actually done, never mind those that frowned, you will personally see lessons learned along the way,  not as a mountain expert or travel guide, but pure soul reflection of a climb of note.


 My Trip Dates:  9 May 2011- 16 May 2011

Type of travel: Bus from the city centre of Dar-es Salaam to Moshi town. Slept over 9 May for the coming journey ahead.

The group had a wide range and diversity from the youngest of only 12years old ! We paid $1800 per person. There were eight people in total.

Choosing the Route

The planted sub conscious droning on streaming fear of the risk came in handy to factor common sense when it was time for coordination of the final plan of the adventure. Most will climb Kilimanjaro just once, so the path chosen should ensure success to get to the top!

Now statistics can really be unreliable depending on who is consulted. The estimation is that only thirty percent of people reach  Uhuru Peak.

There are basically six official routes to get to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro.

  1. Marangu
  2. Lemosho
  3. Rongai
  4. Umbwe
  5. Shira
  6. Machame

Three of these routes, namely Marangu, Machame and Umbwe approach from a southerly direction. Two of the routes Lemosho and Shira from the west and Rongai from the northeasterly side.

Each has s considerations to take note of and differing success rates. I chose the five night Rongai route. It is consistent and gradual except when reaching the final ascent. It is less crowded and has a wider range of scenery.

Each person daring to venture the climb up should choose the best one for themselves or group that accompanies them.

Climbing Kilimanjaro is not a cheap mission and needs to be carefully planned. It is better not to try not cut corners and risk injury as a result.

Day one

We hiked for five hours!  It was approximately eight kilometres in total. We were picked up in Arusha after an early morning breakfast. We drove to the Marangu Gate.

The trail starts in tall corn fields leading to pine forests. It was a gradual ascent and we enjoyed the surroundings. The Montane forests were spectacular. We had a lunch break halfway up.  Our tents were set up by the time we reached  1st caves camp. We were made aware of cold temperatures of the night and served a warm supper!

Day two

On day two we hiked about seven hours up to Kekelewa caveat 3600m.  We passed the second cave at 3450m and took a lunch break. All was set up by the time we reached the freezing and exposed camp!

 Day Three

On day 3 we ventured towards the Mawenzu tarn camp at 4330m. The trail was short but we got to see some exotic plants in the moorland.  The views were just spectacular and we gazed at the sunset splendor.

Day Four

On Day four we made our way up to the Kibo hut at 4700m. It took about five hours. The area is an alpine desert. It was an early night that evening.

Day Five

Day Five took about eight hours, An ascent six kilometres up. We were on a mission to reach the summit! We were woken up close to midnight to begin the attempt to reach the summit. Rock and the steep path ahead at the highest altitude ever. We reached the snow covered point until the summit. A lifetime accomplishment!

Day Six

Descend back down is about 27 km for six hours.We stopped at Horombo Hut  at 3720m and finally Marangu Gate (1980m)

Research matters

The dormant volcano Kilimanjaro comprises of the volcanic cones, Mawenzi, Kibo, this is where the Uhuru summit is .

Kibo is dormant but it is not extinct. The last eruption happened 360000 years back. Volcanic activity occurred two hundred years ago and the ash pit is visible from the Uhuru Peak.

The summit of Mount Kilimanjaro is called Uhuru Peak and stands at 5,895m.  Mount Everest, 8,848 meters which are just over 2,950 meters higher than Kilimanjaro.

Depending on which route is taken, it is a walking mountain, so no need to worry if about grappling skills. If you happen to not be an avid hiker, it is best to get some practice trails beforehand.

More preparation will help. Prepare hiking between four and twelve hours each day for approximately six or seven days. You need to be comfortable with endurance bearing in mind the distance as well.

  • Do a through gear checklist. Get hiking boots. No one needs to deal with blister s and other feet issues.
  • The temperature and weather can fluctuate dramatically from the start to the end of the trip, so it is better to choose wick fabrics and bring along layers.
  • Get good quality thermal underwear and a warm hat, gloves, sunscreen and sunglasses, rain protection, a day pack, camel backs and water bottles

No Rushing!

This is not a race, not a sprint. Chill out, relax and check out amazing views along the way while your body adjusts. The guides are helpful in pacing out the climb appropriately

Once the days hiking is over get ready to set up camp. Take a short climb up and back down for the body to adjust and acclimatise.  Acute mountain sickness can affect the strongest and healthiest. All are susceptible and gender age or fitness does not correlate.

Be aware of the realities

It is an awkward truth that acute mountain sickness causes about ten people to die each year when they attempt to get to the top of Kilimanjaro. Many have to be carried down before getting to the top.  The major issue causing evacuations as a result of altitude sickness.

Now success is also about drinking plenty water amounts and eating on a regular basis as well even if there may be a case of appetite loss.  Get a guide or a company that provides good meals as well. There is a medication for acute mountain sickness if you feel an onset of symptoms coming up as well as prevention.

Once a certain point has been reached there is no way of curing any acute altitude sickness and at this time it would be best to stop the climb and head back down. It is important to pay attention to the body and never underestimate any signs of dangers.

Amazing sights along the way

The journey up offers travel passing through a rainforest, where there are pep monkeys and other crawlies too and worldly unique vegetation.

Wazawa Tours

Once the top is reached there is not a lot of vegetation, but snow and rock, and the view from above get you viewing the clouds below! It is an amazing planet earth venture of note. Each camp along the way is breathtaking peaceful and beautiful beyond words.

It is the best time to click into a soul connection. Breathe m think and clear the mind. Contemplate your soul purpose, you connect the environment and think about how and why your calling here appeared.

But before delving into headspace do get to know the guides as well as fellow hikers that will accompany you on the journey ahead. There is a lot to learn from each other. Encouragement, patience and support are really needed.

The Mountain is Mind Over Matter

Wazawa Tours

It is not completely true that there is no real challenge, It is a mountain for sure. The highest free standing in the world and the top of Africa!

By mind, over matter, we all reach an awareness level. We program our minds to create success or failure levels. Even if you decide that you are reaching the summit, it takes full energy, focus and total discipline.

I thought that summiting Lion’s Head and Table Mountain in Cape Town meant my mind level has been conquered.  You have to work your mind up to not stand in the way of your mission to the Uhuru Peak summit.

The body is capable of the most incredible things. Once self-doubt is dealt with, the mental weariness slips away, new heights of capabilities gets discovered.

In actual fact, the final ten hours are extremely brutal in ways that are not imagined. On the last two nights, you only get to sleep for a limited time before taking off at midnight to keep going up.

You cannot spend much time at the altitude reached so there is a need to go up and down to maximise the hours of sunlight you can capture. You get tired. It is freezing cold! The altitude causes some brain waves to jerk you up a little. Oxygen is so thin and getting enough to breathe is a mission. And the physical exertion is overbearing.

The last miles to the top are steep and the sand gravel is not your best friend this time. Every time you step forward you slide half of a step backwards. It feels like a cruel joke on you. You got to keep holding up and will make it to the top.

And then you get to see the world from the most spectacular and you open your eyes and see that it was all worth it!

You will be at a conquering energy kneeling down in tears of exuberance, and there is a mobile reception on the top by the way. so get ready to Messenger, Tweet a and Skype away!

Once you are on the top, you get fifteen minutes there as the altitude to too tough for the body.   You will need to journey down approximately sixty percent back before you can camp again.  This can be another mission especially if you struggled to get to the summit.

Nevertheless, it is a well-earned victory. Nobody can really be sure they can make it to the top. Once you exit the gate of Kilimanjaro National park, the realisation hits you. You made it all the way and got the to top of the tallest free standing mountain in the whole world.  You travel 50 miles and climb up19300 feet. And you are down to earth!

The human body and strength of your spirit can make you accomplish and handle amazing miracles you never imagined. Pushing yourself to the limits by reaching the peak of this mountain is the ultimate.

Wazawa Tours

Exuberance and pride are intensely overwhelming. It stays engraved in mind archives for any day you may feel down or demotivated. The unparalleled memory of upliftment despite any triumphs you are faced with. Anyone who can afford it and is game should definitely not miss this one!

 

 

The Township Vibe in South Africa-IRRESISTIBLE!

 A turbulent interesting past

A fascinating present

A very promising future

South African Townships have an irresistible soul and vibe that will welcome you and give you the experience of a life time!

Alexandra, or “Alex” as it’s affectionately known, is Gauteng’s oldest township. It a cutout section of the affluent suburb of Sandton.

Alexandra was established as a residential area in 1905 by a white farmer who wanted to establish a white suburb and named it after his wife. In 1912 it was transformed into a ‘Native Township’ where black people were allowed to buy land.

When black land owner rights were dissolved by the Native Land Act of 1913, Alexandra witnessed continuous in-migration due to its proximity to employment opportunities in Johannesburg.

Alex is the hub of culture, root culture. It also has its own community radio and TV station. Popular culture like theatres in the townships was a dynamic force which gave life and a dynamic force that gives hope to people.


Soweto is the fifth most popular destination for overseas visitors to Gauteng province. It’s Jozi’s tourism drawcard. One of the biggest attractions is the Mandela Museum, in Vilakazi Street.  The former four-roomed home of Nelson and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is a deeply moving experience, that reminds us of our past, and gives us hope for the future.

One of the biggest attractions is the Mandela Museum, in Vilakazi Street.  The former four-roomed home of Nelson and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela is a deeply moving experience, that reminds us of our past, and gives us hope for the future.

Hector Pieterson Memorial

The Hector Pieterson Memorial is three blocks from where 13-year-old Hector was shot and died on 16 June 1976. On the day when students in Soweto marched against the repressive imposition of Afrikaans in schools.

A Soweto trip is incomplete without visiting the Regina Mundi Catholic Church, the largest in Soweto. A spiritual haven for many Sowetans and played a pivotal role in the history of resistance to apartheid.

If you’re planning a wedding how about the Ubuntu Kraal? It’s collection of straw-roofed rondavels that form a homestead, popular as a wedding and conference venue.

The Soweto Festival is held annually every heritage day weekend. The venue is the magnificent Walter Sisulu Square in Kliptown, the site of the signing of the historic Freedom Charter by anti-apartheid organisations in 1955.

This is the ideal place for the people of Soweto to congregate over Heritage weekend as the Square is a national monument. The Soweto Festival centres around an exhibition and day-long entertainment events.

The Katlehong township area smouldered with political tension in the early 1990s and the name was associated with violent protests and a low-level civil war amongst factions.

Art Centre has evolved into a showcase of exquisite ethnic artwork are influenced by township emotional turmoil themes.

Welcome  #ExploreMotherlandAfrica. Join us and for more township vibes…coming soon

 

Safari in Namibia – Quiver Trees, lions, zebras, giraffes and more….

 

Get ready for Africa. Namibia is rich in animal species, like no other in the world.  And then you welcome natural friendly people, streams of thorn bush Savannah, Makalani palms, Mopane bushland, baobabs,giraffes, lions, zebras.

Welcome to the vast game reserves in Namibia, the biggest,  Etosha National Park 

National Parks and Game Reserves

Namibia has protection in line with the Etosha National Park and other nature and game reserves galore. Etosha National Park, the third largest and one of the finest parks in Africa. The Etosha pan is a saline lake that is dried out adding to the uniqueness of the landscape, a vast shallow depression with water holes in the south that guarantee a game viewing that is rewarding.

Etosha National Park, one of the world’s best wildlife sanctuaries, is excellent for wildlife-watching. In a huge salt pan surrounded by over 22,000 sq km (over 8,500 sq miles) of grasslands and bush.

This is where you can encounter  Africa’s Savannah animals like the giraffe, elephant, rhino,  buffalo, zebra, wildebeest,  various species of antelopes  and predators like the cheetah,  lion leopard,  wild dog and hyena.

The endemic mammal species include the gerbils and bats, the black faced impala. The Namib Desert has thirty endemic dune-dwellers. Endangered mammals like the  wild dog, lion, black rhino, puku, waterbuck and oribi can be found here

The over twenty species of antelope from the largest being the Eland and the smallest Damara dik-dik . Then there is a range of smaller mammals including the jackal and mongoose all over the country and the less common honey badger and antbear.

Namibia took the lead in the world to initiate the environment protection and wildlife utilisation sustainability into the Constitution.

 “The State shall actively promote and maintain the welfare of the people by adopting international policies aimed at the following: maintenance of ecosystems, essential ecological processes, and biological diversity of Namibia, and utilization of living natural resources on a sustainable basis for the benefit of all Namibians, both present and future.”

With the growing numbers of eco tourists, many farmers have abandoned cattle and have turned their expansive farms into private game reserves.

The Caprivi Strip is considered by experts to be one of Africa’s top 10 birding destinations. Some 620 species have been recorded. the highest concentration of birds in Namibia, including some near-endemic species.

Or you can just admire the glories of the skeleton coast. Hike a nature trail across the gravel plains of the arid and forbidding Skeleton Coast region, see ancient desert-adapted plant species such as welwitschia, lithops and delicate lichens.

Be amazed by the Fish River Canyon, the world’s largest after the Grand Canyon, and the nearby Kokerboom Forest, home of bizarrely elegant kokerbooms (quiver trees).  San people used the giant aloes to create quivers for arrows. There are now protected species of plant that is located in Namibia.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Namibia City Life : Windhoek – ‘Air Basin Surrounded by Rolling Mountains’

Namibia is an ideal destination for adventure, but if you are not in the adventurous mode to experience it, a road network that is maintained will make the journey a pleasure!

Windhoek is Namibia’s capital city and lies in the heart of the central highlands in an airy basin surrounded by rolling mountains. It is the cleanest, most relaxed and safest capital cities in Southern Africa, the perfect place to round up or launch a Namibian holiday.

At the arrival in the cosy capital of Windhoek, there is an impressive combination of innovative modern constructions and old German colonial buildings. Many shops have German owners and you meet German speaking Namibians everywhere.

It’s a bustling, cosmopolitan city with good hotels, sophisticated shops and great bistros. There is a  harmonious blend of  European and African cultures and overall friendliness.

State buildings range from the Parliament of Namibia to the newly founded Hero’s Acre on the road to Rehoboth. The Heroes’ Acre is a modern, state of the art national symbol that was inaugurated by His Excellency, Dr Sam Nujoma, on 26 August 2002.

It was built to foster the spirit of patriotism and nationalism and to pass on this legacy to the future generation of Namibia. The Heroes’ Acre took 13 months to construct covering 732.9212 hectares. It houses 174 graves.

Day tours are available to Katutura, the Windhoek museums, the National Library,  National Art Gallery, National Archives, National Art Gallery and the Botanical Gardens.

Or you can admire the German colonial architecture of the Alte Feste, (1892) In Robert Mugabe Avenue.this is one of the oldest buildings in Windhoek, with its cornerstone laid in 1890. It served as a military headquarters in 1915 and then as a hostel for the Windhoek High School in 1935. In 1957 it was declared a national monument.

It now houses state museum, where the historic independence collection, reflecting events leading up to the independence of Namibia can be seen.  You can also see the Tintenpalast parliament building and the Christuskirche, the city’s landmark church.

 

Shop for African crafts and curios and splurge on local game such as springbok or kudu at the city’s fine restaurants. The bi-monthly Windhoek Street Market has local crafts every second Saturday.

An opportunity to buy diamonds and other semi-precious stones or Herero dolls. There is also a range of wooden hand-carvings, karosse rugs, jewellery and liqueur chocolates manufactured in Windhoek as well as Swakara garments.

A little seaside resort of Swakopmund is ideal. There is a strong Germanic flavour to its boarding houses and bars, and it is surrounded by a desert that is great for quad-biking, dune buggy racing and sand-boarding.

It was the German merchant and adventurer Adolf Luederitz from Bremen, who bought the bay of Angra Pequeña from Nama Chief Joseph Fredericks in 1883 for 10 000 Reichsmark and 260 guns. The bay is today known as Luederitz Bay. Later when diamonds were discovered – German authorities branded the area between Lüderitz and the Orange River a ‘forbidden area’.

The diversity of Namibia is a rich blend of traditions and cultures. The population is composed of several different ethnic groups, including the San, the Khoi-Khoi, the Herero, and the Ovambo as well as the small European population, largely Germans and Afrikaners.

Visit the kraal, or homestead, of indigenous semi-nomadic pastoralists, the Himba, in the Kaokoland region of northern Namibia, to learn about tribal customs and desert survival techniques.

Namibia is the fourth largest exporter of non-fuel minerals in Africa and the world’s fifth largest producer of uranium and is set to become the largest exporter of uranium by 2015.

Currency: Namibian dollar N

Electrical Plugs: 50Hz

Languages: English is the sole official language of Namibia. German, Afrikaans and Oshiwambo became recognised regional languages.

You need a passport and a visa
The luxury Desert Express runs between Swakopmund and Windhoek, a 19-hour 30-minute journey which includes several stops which give travellers the opportunity to watch lions feeding, see the Namib Desert,stroll in the sand dunes admiring the stars! ExploreMotherlandAfrica#

Angola – Africa’s Dazzling Delight Diamond Dust Beaches

Located on the West coast of Southern Africa, Angola boasts the second largest waterfall in Africa, various  national parks, rivers and scenic coastline.

Flag, Angola, Angola Flag, Red, Black


The initial  Angola inhabitants were Khoisan speakers. Large numbers of Bantu speakers migrated to the region and became the dominant group. Angola gets its name from the Bantu kingdom of Ndongo, whose name for its king is Ngola.

Angola was under colonial rule until November 11, 1975, when it became an independent nation.

It was explored by the Portuguese navigator Diego Cão in 1482. Angola became a link in trade with India and Southeast Asia. Later it was a  source of slaves for Portugal’s New World colony of Brazil. Angola is the second-largest oil producer in sub-Saharan Africa.Angola is Southern Africa’s final frontier.  Angola was racked by the civil war that caused devastation for about 30 years. Tourism barely touched this remote and spectacular country which offers a truly unique and unforgettable travel experience.  Spread elegantly on the northern Atlantic coast, Luanda was a graceful capital in colonial times.

Angola is Southern Africa’s final frontier.  Angola was racked by the civil war that caused devastation for about 30 years. Tourism barely touched this remote and spectacular country which offers a truly unique and unforgettable travel experience.  Spread elegantly on the northern Atlantic coast, Luanda was a graceful capital in colonial times.These days it has a Caribbean-island flavour laced with Portuguese influences. Lubango in the south is the main town of Namibe Province, with a desert to explore as well empty beaches offering the ultimate in relaxation.

These days it has a Caribbean-island flavour laced with Portuguese influences. Lubango in the south is the main town of Namibe Province, with a desert to explore as well empty beaches offering the ultimate in relaxation.Angola with diamond sparkling beaches the second largest Africa Waterfall and the virgin wildlife parks has a  special lure that only a few places can match.

Angola with diamond sparkling beaches the second largest Africa Waterfall and the virgin wildlife parks has a  special lure that only a few places can match.

Cataracts, Angola, Rainbow, Nature

And if you want to do some beachcombing, there are fantastic beaches in Luanda, at Ilha do Cabo, Mussulo, Palmeirinhas, Corimba and Santiago.In Benguela, there is Restinga, Morena,  Caóta, Baia Azul, Caotina and Baia Farta and in the  Namibe,  Das Miragens and the  Azul.

In Benguela, there is Restinga, Morena,  Caóta, Baia Azul, Caotina and Baia Farta and in the  Namibe,  Das Miragens and the  Azul.

National Integral Park of Kwando and the National Park of Cangandala, in the province of Malange, home of the black Palanca, is a species to be found only in Angola.The National Park of Quissama, South of Luanda, has the elephant, the African antelope and the wild boar. The coastline of the park is used as an egg laying.The National Park of Quissama, South of Luanda, has the elephant, the African antelope and the wild boar. The coastline of the park is used as an egg laying.The National Park of Quissama, South of Luanda, has the elephant, the African antelope and the wild boar. The coastline of the park is used as an egg laying

The National Park of Quissama, South of Luanda, has the elephant, the African antelope and the wild boar. The coastline of the park is used as an egg laying ground for the sea turtles. And obviously, you are roped off walking on the coastline that’s a maternity ward for sea turtles!

If you’re looking for leopard, lions, the chacal, the antelope or elephants you’ll find them in the National Park of Kameia, in the Province of Moxico. Elephants, antelopes, elands, gnus and zebras are in the National Park of Bicuar, in the Province of Huila.

The National Park of Mupa, in the Province of Cunene, is home to the ostrich, the elephant and the hippopotamus. The National Park of Iona, in the Namibe  Province where zebras, elephant, the rhinoceros and leopard roam freely.

Making it in time for the carnival

Carnival, Angola’s answer to Mardi Gras, comes in February, an excuse for everyone to dress up in elaborate costumes ranging from porn stars to politicians.But one of the best ways to experience the whole lot of this region is to catch the legendary train from Benguela to its twin port town of Lobito

But one of the best ways to experience the whole lot of this region is to catch the legendary train from Benguela to its twin port town of Lobito. Benguela was long the centre of an important trade, especially in slaves to Brazil and Cuba.

Benguela is barely set up for tourism in the modern sense, but nevertheless boasts a handful of reasonable guesthouses, some decent restaurants and a nascent nightlife. Independence Day on November 11 is celebrated with parades and presidential speeches.

And days you should try and be there? Public Holidays……Angola is notable as it has 15 public holidays over the year. These are:

January 1 – New Year’s Day


January 4 – Day of the Fallen against the colonial repression.


January 25 – Luanda’s Day


February 4 – Day of the Armed Struggle


The most important day of global celebration is March 8, International Women’s Day. A global celebration of the social political and economic achievements of women


April 4 – Peace Day, or Ceasefire Day, end of the Civil War


May 1 – Labour Day May 25 – Africa’s Day


June 1 is International Children’s Day


November 2 – All Souls Day

All Souls Day is also known as the Feast of All Souls


November 11 – Independence Day


December 25 – Christmas


December 31 – New Year’s Eve

Angola Highlight Drawing Cards

  • The currency is Kwanza (Kz) is the currency. US dollars are also widely accepted.
  • Experiencing something of a cultural renaissance.
  • Places like Restaurante Escondidinho buzz with young locals practising the kizombe, Angola’s romantic and highly sensuous national dance.
  • More than 90 percent of this population speaks Bantu languages, one of the major ones being Kimbundu. The Mbundu people live mainly in Luanda and neighbouring regions. Kimbundu has several mutually-intelligible dialects.
  • Angola Football Achievements is  COSAFA Cup : Times Champion (1999, 2001, 2004) and Central African Games

Welcome : Explore Motherland Africa

300 days of Desert Sunshine in South-West Africa – Namibia

Wedged between the Kalahari and the South Atlantic, in the south-west of Africa between the Orange river in the south and the Kunene river in the north - Namibia boasts deserts, seascapes, bushwalking and boundlessness. Blessed with rich natural resources, a solid modern infrastructure, diverse cultures and an annual quota of 300 days of sunshine, it is a beautiful country of vast potential.

It’s an arid, rough land, the world’s 34th largest country, a different world, but still inviting, strangely familiar and easy to travel. Namibia is a photographer’s dreamland, a land of contrasts and clear colours. It’s not for those, who like busy beaches and have fun in crowds. It’s one of the most scarcely populated countries on earth after Mongolia. But if you love nature, stillness, grandiose landscapes, desert and expanse, Namibia’s for you.

But Namibia isn’t just silence and wide open spaces.  There is dune buggy racing, horse racing, and dune skiing.

Africa, Namibia, Kolmanskop, Ghost TownNamibia has a colourful and turbulent history. Because Namibia has one of the world’s most barren and inhospitable coastlines, it was one of the last African countries to be colonised. In the mid-19th century, German missionaries opened up the interior, paving the way for traders who came later. The distinctive German  traditions and architecture and traditions come from the  1884 annexation of the country by Germany

As a nation, however, Namibia is relatively young, having gained its independence from South Africa after prolonged struggles only in March of 1990

 

Essentially a desert country, Namibia offers contrasting landscapes. The Namib Desert – believed to be the oldest desert in the world – is a vast swathe of high dunes and desolate plains with an awe-inspiring sense of space. The wind-whipped coast with innumerable shipwrecks stretches all along the hostile Namib desert. The dune fields are approximately 150 kilometres wide with some dunes as high as 300 metres. It is the oldest desert

It is the oldest desert on the earth with a unique flora and fauna. Millions of years ago the Orange river washed diamonds into the sea. Currents, waves and the wind transported them into the sand dunes of the Namib, thus creating a source of natural wealth for Namibia.

Spitzkoppe, Namibia, Rock, Rock Arch

You can climb some of the world’s highest sand dunes and a must
Avid rock climbers  should venture into Spitzkoppe located betweem  Swakopmund and Windhoek known as the Matterhorn of Namibia.

You can visit the Namib Naukluft Park, the fourth-largest conservation area in the world, where oryx stroll over apricot-, ochre- and fawn-coloured dunes tufted with grasses. The oryx antelope has become perfectly adapted to the climate. Springbok, kudu, ostrich, baboon, mountain zebra and leopard are also found here.

Zebra, Wild Animal, Wildlife, Namibia

Although apparently empty, the Namib teems with life, much of it unique to this landscape. The number of insect species is estimated at 20.000. Also among the reptiles some of the species – like the transparent Palmato Gecko – are endemic. And in Namibia, all the southern African snake species can be found, some of them poisonous like the Puffadder, Black Mamba, Green Boomslang, Cape Cobra and Spitting Cobra.

Elephant, Namibia, Etosha National Park

You can watch rare desert-adapted elephants as they browse the trees in the dry beds of the Ugab and Huab Rivers in northern Namibia, or dig down into the earth with their tusks in search of water.

These trees from the “dead Vlei” have been dead over 600 years. Or you can explore the mysteries of the vanishing ghost towns of the Namib desert.

Because Namibians believe in being up close and personal, you’re encouraged to walk or ride through the desert, but you can also take a bird’s eye view…

Namibia is one of the best game countries in Africa. Early in the 1900s, people started to take the protection of wildlife seriously and game reserves, like the 20.000 SQ km Etosha National Park, was established. Today a total of about 120.000 SQ km, some 15% of the entire country, fall under nature conservation, not to mention the many private nature and game reserves.

Namibia is a gem for those in search of wildlife and wilderness. It’s a country of compelling beauty, abundant sunshine, and unconfined space. This feeling of tranquillity and stillness combines with a landscape which is singular in its colours, full of contrasts of light and shade.

Animals, Impala, Africa, Etosha, Namibia

Welcome and ExploreMotherland Africa#

Tropical Paradise – Mauritius (Le République de Maurice)

 

Le République de Maurice, known as Mauritius is accessible tropical paradise Indian Ocean island and is budget friendly for travelers too. Sheltered by  coral reef barriers that form  safe lagoons that are crystal clear, Mauritius stays on top of the list of dream destinations.

The island of Mauritius is eleven times larger than Washington, DC. It was a volcano originally and stands on what was initially a land bridge between Africa and Asia, the Mascarene Archipelago.

This archipelago formed by undersea volcanic eruptions about ten million years ago and the African plate drifted over Réunion.

Mauritius became known to Malay and  Arab and Malay sailors in the 10th century and was explored for the very first time in 1505 by the Portuguese.

In 1598, the  Dutch fleet of three ships was on route to the Spice Islands and got blown off by a cyclone landing on the island. It was named to honour Prince Maurice of Nassau.  In 1715, France seized Mauritius. Along came the French, sugar cane and captured African slaves to work on sugar plantations.

The French harboured the outlawed “Corsairs” (pirates) who hijacked the British vessels when sailing between Britain and Britain and were laden with valuable goods for trade. The British then captured Mauritius in the year 1810.  In 1968 Mauritius gained independence.

Mauritius is a blend of diverse cultures and religions. The population consists of Africans, Indians, British, Creole, Madagascar natives, Chinese, Europeans and Muslims . Descendants of the Indian labourers were brought in after slavery was abolished in 1835. The Muslim and Chinese added to the touch of a Creole and  French cultural legacy.

The Beach of a life

Life’s a beach – and then you die!  The signature of sunny days, and the turquoise lagoon surrounded by the3rd largest coral reef springs out a  typical tropical sweet air with endless beaches.  Mauritius is a true paradise for sea and sun lovers.

Or head to Grand Baie, for parasailing, submarine and semi-submersible scooters, Forget about walking on water, try walking under it!

Mauritius has an abundance of sea treasures like moray eels,  magnificent coral beds with multi coloured fish.  You get to see them scuba diving at the Trou aux Biches guided by the Mauritius Scuba Diving Association (MSDA).

One of the most spectacular ways to explore the ocean beds is to go on board a submarine. Encounter invigorating marine life stepping back into 17th century where various wrecks  can be viewed

Blue Bay beach is the only marine park in Mauritius and one of the most popular bathing spots.  This is perfect for sailing or windsurfing.  Either get into a  glass bottom boat expedition or snorkel to see coral and fish.

Quieter days in the Northern Islands – Gabriel Island,

Check out the rarest stamps at  Blue Penny Museum. In 1847, Mauritius was the fifth country in the world to issue postage stamps.

Mauritius the issued Blue Two Pence and Red Penny stamp. , the 5th country in the world to issue postage stamps. These became the most valuable and famous and valuable rare stamps.

Or go gawk at dodo skeletons in the Natural History Museum.  Mauritius on discovery, was home to an unknown bird species, that the Portuguese named called dodo (simpleton). By the year 1681, all of the dodos were killed by the settlers or domesticated animals. The dodo prominently features as a national coat-of-arms supporter.

Whats for shopping and dinner in Mauritius?

The Mauritius cuisine blends, Creole, Indian, Chinese and European.This friendly cultural co-existence of cultures lives in a blend croissants and curry menus.

 

Roof around for souvenirs and T-shirts upstairs in the bustling of the Central Market, locals bargain over tea and essentials in the midst of catching up on latest gossip trends.

The market was Built in the year 1844. It is the meeting point Mauritians on a search of a “dithe” (tea) or “cari” (curry) .

The market is for getting some local crafts, vegetables as well as “dholl purris”  or herbal tea blends.  Mauritius is popular for duty-free shopping and saving on the cost of textiles.

Mauritius in Tune with Nature

The Rivière Noire is a district of  Creole fishermen’s  where there is  Sega dancing and lively on Saturday nights.

The African roots of Sega, and ”ravane”  traditional percussion instruments as well as metallic triangle metallic clicks. The song compositions describe slavery miseries voice out social satires of inequalities encountered by Creoles.

Mauritius was uninhabited until the 16th century and became a biodiversity hotspot, known for natural beauty.

Invigorate yourself. Go mountain climbing or explore nature through forests, plants or endemic flowers. Enjoy spectacular eco-tourism beauty of playgrounds.

The South-Eastern end is  900 hectares covered in tropical forests  where boars, stag and does  boars roam  around  freely

Mauritius has a total of  700 indigenous plant species. Many plants are threatened with possible extinction because as their natural habitat has been diminished.

Exploring the botanical gardens of  Pamplemousses Gardens, an  18th century and the third oldest in the whole world. It has an international plant collection and includes a spice garden and talipot palm that flowers every  60 years, then dies.  Worldwide naturalists are aware of the exotic and indigenous plants present like the giant Victoria Amazonica water lilies and various palm trees species.  The garden boasts five hundred plant species.

Worldwide naturalists are aware of the exotic and indigenous plants present like the giant Victoria Amazonica water lilies and various palm trees species.  The garden boasts five hundred plant species. Protection of endangered species and natural resources in place with Ile aux Aigrettes, the Mauritius Wildlife fund.

The rarest birds in the world like the pink pigeon and Kestrel can be found here. Families should head to Casela Bird Park Situated in the Rivière Noire district, the bird park stretches over 25 hectares and contains more than 90 aviaries 140 bird species from all five continents.

Hiking in the 6,794-hectare Black River Gorges National Park through the forest and see wildlife, birds and indigenous plants. The Black River Peak trail leads to the highest mountain in Mauritius.

But Mauritius isn’t just nature.  There’s a lot of history going down as well. The Vieux Grand Port is the oldest  Mauritius settlements  where  ruins of  Dutch fortifications can be seen

Pailles Valley, Domaine trends as a harmonious combination of culture, history and nature inflames imagination.  There are journeys to the sugar mill as well as the rum distillery by  a horse- carriage or train

Get ready to #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Fast Facts. 
Currency Mauritius Rupee. 
Symbol: Rs

Electrical Plugs:
12 50Hz                         

Language: 
Most inhabitants are equally fluent in both French and English.                                                  
A visitor must be in possession of a valid passport and a return or onward ticket.                                  
Time Zones:  GMT/UTC+4                               
Country Dialing Code +230                                 
The  Mauritius cyclone season:
November-May.

In Memory of W G Robertson. Thanks to the 'Freeway tours team Julie Hall and Thandi Brewer

Magical Magnificent Mozambique

Tropical Beach Paradise

The coastline of Mozambique stretches over a thousand kilometres and lines up a magnificent strand of tropical beaches.

Ilha de Mozambique, or Mozambique Island, is a tiny island off Northern Mozambique. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage site and it’s got a history that’s something incredible.

Almost close to four hundred years, Mozambique was under Portuguese rule, and prior to that, it was a  base for  Arab traders. The entire island is a kilometre squared and connects to the mainland via a concrete bridge.

Vilanculos is a beach pathway into the  Bazaruto Archipelago of islands as well as the renowned underwater national park in Mozambique.

One of the best greatest things to do here is to catch a ride on a traditional sailing dhow and go for a glide through the Archipelago. This is seriously one of the most stunning places on or off the African continent. An island journey of awesome azure waters,  palm trees, sandy beaches and coral reefs.

The marine reserve is one of the biggest achievements for Mozambique and plays an important role in marine conservation worldwide.  It is best to scuba dive to experience the best of it.

In fact, the Bazaruto Archipelago offers some of the best diving in the world. The dive sites are never over crowded l. The water is crystal clear and there are protected coral reefs  buzzing with hump back whales, dolphins, hump back sharks,  spotted eagle rays, manta, turtles and more

 

Ponta d’Ouro.

Ponta d’Ouro Bay located in the  Southern part of Mozambique. There is a small village but filled with tourist camps. It is very popular with fishermen and beach holidayers and surfers. Apparently, the Ponto has perfect waves.

Like other spots in Mozambique, the diving experience is awesome here. Underwater there are more coral reefs making beautiful patterns with a flow of colourful fish that pass through.

Mainly you’ll want to go there for the experience of swimming with dolphins. This is where the group is that does snorkelling trips out to swim with the dolphins.

Those that conduct dolphin tours are passionate about conservation. They will inform you how dolphins are threatened and you gain marine conservation insight while having incredible experiences.

You have to drive into Ponta with a 4 x 4, no other way. It stays parked in the safe parking at Kosi Bay where many people leave their cars.

Image result for Bazaruto Archipelago

Although most people go for the beaches, there is some beautiful old architecture in Mozambique.

The urban area’s quite small and concentrated with wide avenues, old trees and Mediterranean style architecture. It is an attractive capital city in Africa with an active vibe with cafes and supermarkets.

Cuisine Culture and where to Stay

Maputo is the important harbour, it is 90 kilometres from the South African border. There’s a wide range of accommodation, from the mega-luxury to bed and breakfasts and backpacking lodges.

Cuisine mainly includes seafood. And the mix of cooking styles in the Portuguese style with lots of seafood. They have maize-meal,  rice and millet dishes with hot stews – typical of the African diet. Curries are a favourite named, ‘Caril’.

So if it’s exotic, cultural stuff you want, this is a place to visit. It’s a magic mix of old Portuguese and old Muslim architecture. Basically, it’s divided into two halves. There’s the old Stone Town in the North and Reed Town in the South.

If you are planning a trip to Mozambique, please be a responsible tourist. Don’t drive on the beach. It is illegal and it destroys natural habitats. Dunes were destroyed as a result of driving that was irresponsible. Do not litter. If you are camping, bring along some bin bags and dispose of the rubbish in a  proper way.

Don’t buy shells, corals, juvenile or reef fish. If you dive, do not touch or grab marine life. Some species are very friendly, but if you touch them or feed them you can change their behaviour.

And remember, the coral reefs are precious. Holding onto the reef, hitting it or swiping fins over it kills the coral. It won’t just grow back! Global tourism is a key threat to ecologically sensitive areas. So let’s protect our beautiful places.

Be the responsible tourist and make a difference! Join in and exploremotherlandafrica

 

Malawi Markets, Museums, Music and Dance

Mzuzu is the capital of the northern region. The famous Livingstonia Mission and its museum is close.

900 m above Lake Malawi there are views of incredible beauty across the lake to Tanzania. Livingstonia is a mission settlement dating from 1894 and established by Robert Laws a disciple of David Livingstone.

 

The Old Stone House, which was the home of the Laws family, is now a resthouse and museum.

Explore Lilongwe, Malawi’s capital. Alongside the traditional Old Town, with its markets, is the modern city and seat of government with its imaginative architecture in a garden setting.

Blantyre,  is the commercial capital of Malawi as well as the largest town. It was established at the end of  19th century. It is really two towns: Blantyre and Limbe, joined by a development corridor.  The city was originated by David Livingstone’s Scottish missionaries. It’s named after Livingstone’s birthplace in Scotland.

Blantyre has many historical buildings including, Old  Boma, the original town hall. The Mandala House , built in 1882 was the African Lakes Company headquarters. It was the first two-storey building in Malawi and is believed to be the country’s oldest house. The most impressive are the tow churches, All Angels  an St Michael . These were  with no  formal architecture, construction o brick-making training

 

 

You’ll find the Thyolo (pronounced Cho’lo) tea estates between Blantyre and Mount Mulanje. Tea has been grown here since 1908 and the primly trimmed bushes (strictly trees) make the whole area look like a neatly kept but vast garden.

Nkhotakota, on the central lakeshore, is one of Africa’s oldest market towns and was once a centre of the slave trade. Or else there Nkhata Bay, a busy port and market and a favourite shop and stop place.

 

Everything is Malawi is handmade.  There’s no factory production of curios. So have a look for woodcarvings, wood and cane furniture, soapstone carvings, decorated wooden articles, colourful textiles, pottery, beadwork, cane and raffia. The standard of woodcarving is one of the highest in Africa. The Mua Mission, south of Salima, where carvers are trained, has an excellent shop. Traditional musical instruments are also sold throughout Malawi.

Malawi has a thoroughly deserved reputation for the friendliness of its people. This is a land of smiles, of genuine friendship. The Gule Wamkulu (performed by the Chewa and Mang’anja), with its heavily carved masks, feathers and skin paint, is an important dance in Malawian culture.

Malawians have long been travellers, and their music has spread across Africa. In the late 1960s, Malawi produced its own kwela stars, like Daniel Kachamba & His Kwela Band. By the 1970s, electric guitars, American rock and roll, soul and funk influenced the music scene, to create a fusion called afroma lead by the band New Scene, led by Morson Phuka.

The 1980s saw soukous from the Democratic Republic of the Congo become popular. The Malawian variety was called kwasa kwasa.  The traditional music of Malawian music has also reached commercial success, like folk fusionist Pamtondo, whose music uses rhythms from the Lomwe, Makuwa and Man’ganja peoples.

Music can be the food of love.  But sometimes you need some real food.  And malawi’s got some special tastes. Chumbo – tilapia fish is the main lake delicacy.  Eaten with Mthochi – bread made from bananas and Mbatata cookie made with sweet potato and cinnamon it’s a great meal. Top it off with Malawi gin and tonic,  Inexpensive and it’s developed an almost cult status.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • The currency in Malawi is the Kwacha.
  • And in terms of electricity, they use 50Hz volts.
  • The standard plus is square three-pin.
  • Chichewa is the main language that is widely spoken, but the language of the business community is English.
Special Thanks to Freeway Tours Team,Thandi Brewer,Julie Hall.In Memory of William Robertson

 

 

Exploring Safari in Malawi


Malawi has unique scenery, evergreen forests, waterfalls, rare wildlife and stunning valleys. Go wildlife and game viewing in the national parks, without the tarred roads filled with convoys of 4-wheel drive vehicles.

Malawi’s nine Wildlife Reserves offer truly unspoilt wilderness. A Safari experience that will be the thrill of safaris with crowds of elephants, leopards, rhino. hippos and antelope

Look for elephants during the early mornings and evenings in Kasungu National Park, when they come to drink from dambos (river channels). The grasslands support large herds of buffalo and kudu and reedbuck.

Malawi has the best birdlife in the region. Vwasa Wildlife Reserve has close to 300 species including stork, heron and the white-faced tree duck.

Herds of thirty or forty elephants are regularly to be seen and there are large numbers of hippos.

Lake Kazuni, near the main entrance to the reserve is famous for its hippos. Buffalo are present in the reserve but their roaming habits make their sightings less easy to predict.

Stunning Sceneries

Nyika National Park

Nyika , Malawi’s largest park and completely unique in Africa. It means “where the water comes from” and it’s one of Malawi’s most important catchment areas.

In the rainy season, the park is covered with wildflowers and over 200 types of orchid. It also has a neolithic rock shelter, trout pools and even a ‘magic lake’ the magnificent Nyika Plateau towers to 2500m

Nyika is wonderful for hiking, mountain biking and horse riding safaris to see the diminutive duiker, or Zebra, warthog, bush pig, eland and roan.

The park has one of the highest densities of leopard in Central Africa. If you’re lucky you can catch lions and elephants. For the birdwatcher, over 400 species have been recorded including the rare Denham’s bustard, the wattled crane and the red-winged francolin – endemic to Nyika.

Be mesmerised by the stunning

Views at the top of the 2,100m Zomba Plateau. Its vast forests and waterfalls tower above Zomba, a university town and the former capital. Or climb the magnificent Mulanje Massif. The highest mountain in central Africa, the central point of this huge block of mountains, which cover more than 640 sq km and rises to over 3,000m can be seen at Sapitwa. Dedza, Michiru, Ndirande and Chiradzulu also offer challenging slopes.

Malawi – A Jewel in the Centre of Africa

The main attractions in attractions are the wildlife reserves and national parks and wildlife reserves of unspoilt wilderness where animals are discovered in natural habitat and not merely observed.

Safaris in Malawi cater for all budgets and tastes, You can either rent an open 4×4 for a game drive or take a walking safari and dive safely into the wild.

One other popular option is taking a boat safari on Shire River. This is a great way to see animals from short distances as they have little fear of people that are in a boat,

You get to float close to a mass of hippos and elephants drinking nearby! Other close encounters can be had, for example, when tracking

Close encounters in Majete Reserve can be tracking elephants. Horseback safaris are another opportunity to ride along zebras and antelopes.

The big five ( leopard, elephant lion, buffalo, and rhino) are in Malawi with splendid antelope range and smaller cats. Hippos are found in large numbers and are symbolic of the wildlife scene. Malawi definitely makes a memorable Safari.

Malawi is a popular option for first timers who want a taste of Africa but it is also a sophisticated experience for distinguished wildlife enthusiasts or those who wish to wander and feel the Malawi experience.

With a few visitors, there is an opportunity to solely experience the fascinating peacefulness of an astounding natural environment.  Get ready for lifetime experiences: ExploremotherlandAfrica#