#CreatepreneurAfrica, Igniting Business Sparks, Ghana’s Oscar Bimpong

Visionary leader, Oscar Bimpong, is set in his life purpose to have a positive impact globally and transform businesses.

Author, lecturer, transformational speaker, business consultant, and corporate trainer,Oscar Bimpong is the CEO and founder of Train2inspire Consultancy that sparked off in a 2010 launch.

His passion of motivational speaking as a mentor and coach has led him to forums in Africa and the UK as a guest at motivational speech assemblies, schools, colleges and universities.

“Living in Ghana brings fond memories as it is the best part of my life. It is what shaped my vision and my passion in life. Some of the difficult circumstances I encountered growing up is one of the reasons why I am in the position that I find myself in. It thought me the power of persistence and created the mindset to use the scarce resources at my disposal to achieve my vision against all odds”_   Oscar Bimpong

#CreatePreneurAfrica calling out to Duale Ali’s “Voice of the future”

 

Based in the UK, Duale Ali has a nose for a good story in the universe of digital production! His bilingual calling arrived when his focused wide range journalism and radio host niche sparked off with a Kiswahili journey into BBC WORLD SERVICE."Dira ya Dunia" news program editorial teams embraced his eager contributions and invaluable skills!

His training sessions at the BBC included working with some of the best broadcast journalists, editors, camera and radio operators

He found his true purpose and channeled his radio personality into researching and developing relevant audience stories while working at the BBC world service AFRICAN DIGITAL HUB and POW Media.

With all gained knowledge he was soon researching doing voice-overs and editing news packages!

 

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica’ DUALE ALI in a  dynamic world of content creation

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me I would say is finding new ways to be creative and applying it to my role as a content creator. Whether this is writing a treatment for a documentary, looking for unusual and quirky studios for a photoshoot or even having a conversation with a friend which in turn inspires an article, it’s all relative.

When I look back on my come up, the work I’ve produced, I realise my passion has always been to help people connect and find refuge in my work. It has been so therapeutic for me and I’m eternally grateful because I have an outlet to express myself.  

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

I always say I never knew what I wanted to do growing up because my career goals changed……. pretty much every day.

I was an expressive child, I enjoyed performing on stage and thought I was going to be an actor, even going to auditions. However, deep down I knew it wasn’t what I wanted to do, especially since I didn’t take it seriously compared to my peers.

So for the next couple of years, I battled with the idea of becoming a teacher, optometrist (I liked wearing fancy glasses) and fashion designer. One day, in school I had written an article about the effects of abuse that I and my family suffered at the hands of our racist neighbours when we moved into the area.

Teachers and other members of staff had come to me personally to say how moving the piece was. It wasn’t until a journalist from my regional newspaper caught wind of my article that I knew what my passion was.

For the first time in my 17 years of existence, I felt like I had found my passion. To write. The journalist gave me a tour of my regional newspaper building and from then on I become hooked on creating ever since.

 What drove you to make money from your passions?

I don’t think I ever came into the industry for the money because honestly there isn’t a whole lot anyway. I’m currently freelancing and financially I’m not doing amazing, but it’s enough for me because I love what I do.

Having transferable skills is a big advantage in bringing in extra income and I have developed many over the years, for instance, I studied photography and learned how to use Adobe software’s such as Photoshop, InDesign and Premier pro so people are willing to pay me to help them with their projects.

 

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

In my first year of university, I was a music writer for one of the UK’s leading online music publication. The pay wasn’t too great but at the time I was just looking for the experience and to build my portfolio.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

I worked at this fast food place (I won’t it name for professional reasons) that everyone knows and I hated every minute of it. It was probably one the worst jobs ever and my manager wasn’t the nicest. I vowed myself, once I quit that job I would never give up on my passions of becoming a content creator.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

I try to be as inquisitive and open to new opportunities every day as the saying goes “there is no new opportunities in being comfortable”. I find in doing so, I gain valuable things whether this a meeting somebody new, a skill or something interesting to do with Journalism. Testing your limits creatively is always going to make you a successful person.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Here I am. You can see it.

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

I want to use this opportunity to use my favourite quote “A man who says he can and a man who says he cannot are both usually right”– Unknown  

#CreatePreneurAfrica South Africa’s Refilwe Madumo

Refilwe Madumo, an actress of remarkable note, recently featured as a lead character in an acclaimed SABC miniseries,'Side Dish'. She is also known for her role in a daily drama series, ETV's 'Scandal'. Her journey in the world of entertainment was seeded as a buddying performer when she turned nine years old. 

She is currently completing her Masters in Performing Arts. Her ultimate focus is on creating avenues for young women to discover their voices. She is the commissioning editor for Soul City Rise magazine

“My passion for storytelling is a tool to create visionary pathways for people to reflect on their personal soul journeys in this lifetime.”                                                                       Refilwe Madumo

 

Meet #CreatePreneurAfrica – Refilwe Madumo

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
I am a story-teller. I have always been a story-teller. The ability to weave a reality together – from words on paper and bring it to life – is my greatest gift. Stories are how people make sense of the world.
 How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I knew I wanted to be an actress very early. I used to watch Sarafina every day after school and practice the lines and choreography.
I come from Taung, a village in the North West, where nothing ever happens. The only things that I was sure about were my dreams.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
The fact that it has the potential to change people’s lives. To help them have difficult conversations and see better versions of themselves. I can’t tell you how many people I meet who related to the different roles I’ve played for different reasons. It’s the greatest affirmation of my work.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
I’m lucky enough to have only worked for passion. I can only do things that set my soul on fire. I’ve been lucky enough to create a life with my creative currency.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Backstage 2004. It was a very small fee, I think probably 2 thousand rands, but I was so proud that there was a possibility to make money doing what I love.
Travelstart Domestic
What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I’ve tried to do other things but I’ve found it unfulfilling. It’s weird to say, but creative work is like a calling. You could try to run away from it but if it is yours, there is nothing you can do to escape it.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My kids. I have 2 sons,  Makhosini and Malibuye. I wish my jobs sustained their lives more. That’s what pushes me. To ensure that they want for nothing.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I don’t think about them. My journey is my own. I don’t do what I do for anybody else.
What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?
 Only do this kind of work if you love it. If it is your truest passion, you will be able to come back to it over and over again, no matter how many times it breaks your heart. It’s all worth it if it fulfills you, not just materially, but spiritually too.

#CreatePreneurAfrica,South Africa’s Sibahle Collection – Caroline Hlahla and Khulile Vilakazi-Ofosu

The Sibhale collection was initiated Caroline Hlahla and Khulile Vilakazi-Ofosu ......a calling to mental emancipation..a new definition of freedom....soul freedom. The dolls are representative of an ignition in early ages for black children to be proud of there natural selves, African affirmation at roots level!

“The Sibahle Collection was born from the need to encourage our black children to be comfortable in their own skin! “The dolls smell of vanilla and have typical 4C Afro hair!”     Khulile Vilakazi-Ofosu

 

 

 

 

The first creations were

  • Nobuhle” (One that represents beauty in Zulu)
  • Bontle (meaning beauty in Sotho)

We live in a diverse world, people of all races are everywhere. South Africa is affectionately called the “The Rainbow Nation”

The  “Rainbow Nation” Collection, we will teach children of all races to appreciate and embrace diversity.

Every child should embrace diversity in the world”

“We live in a world that we as black women, black children have been set standards of beauty by other races other than us.  What motivates us to be successful is challenging the beauty standard that society has set for us by having more little girls growing up feeling affirmed that they are beautiful with our long flowy hair, having women having the courage to embrace their natural hair and believe that is is a profession to wear your natural afro to work.”   Caroline Hlahla

 

Meet # CreatePreneurAfrica’s Caroline Hlahla and Khulile Vilakazi-Ofosu

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

We want to leave a legacy, our drive is to be part of something that will positively impact another person’s life either through the Sibahle Collection Doll brand, which consists of a collection of dolls that are representative of us or, through our natural textured hair extension brand ‘Bounce Essential Hair’ which sells afro textured hair extensions that empower black women to embrace their natural hair.

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

We cannot give you a specific age.  It was a soul calling we guess. Our purpose is to conscientiously awaken black pride

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

The feed-back from children who look at our dolls and say “mommy/daddy she is beautiful she looks like me” that response is the validation that we need that our brand is making a difference one doll at a time or the women who buy our afro textured hair extensions having the courage to wear their natural hair and feel beautiful.

 What drove you to make money from your passions? 

The need to make money was not the driving factor to produce the dolls nor the hair extensions. Money is a by-product of us addressing a lack of dolls representative of the black child, children deserve to see themselves in the toys they play with. Further, money has been the by-product of addressing the lack of afro-textured hair extensions to encourage women to embrace their natural hair.

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

When we formally set up the business Bounce Essentials Africa, our goal was to build a brand that would raise awareness that there was an alternative to the flowy Indian/ Peruvian hair on the market. We wanted to give women the tools and know-how of how to take care of their natural hair. We quickly became a brand synonymous with quality and a niche offering, therefore money came as a by-product of addressing a lack on the market.


What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

 

It is always important to remember why you started, what problem were you seeking to solve? Has the problem been resolved? The business has taught us to be resilient, the business has also taught us lessons about growth through failure.

What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

What we love about our brands Sibahle Collection and Bounce Essential hair is that we are addressing the issue of self-love. We live in a world that we as black women, black children have been set standards of beauty by other races other than us.  What motivates us to be successful is challenging the beauty standard that society has set for us by having more little girls growing up feeling affirmed that they are beautiful without long flowy hair. Further, women having the courage to embrace their natural hair and believe that it is professional to wear your natural hair to work.

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

Nothing, one of the most important lesson we learnt on this journey was not focusing on the nay sayers, there were too many, however, what we do say is, be grateful for the few who believe in you.

 

What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?

The hardest thing is to start, there will always be a reason why it is not the right time, be it finances, or timing or other commitments. Our first advice is to take a deep breath and just start, the second is, on this journey you will need to resilient, the journey is full of trying times, disappointment and let downs, however, the journey is also filled with wins, accomplishments and self-growth.

 

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