Biodiverse Rich Coastal Forest in Tanzania: Pugu Hills


Pugu Forest reserve in the Pwani region of Tanzania is adjacent to the Kazimzumbwi Forest Reserve.These forests are considered as the oldest in the world!

There is never a shortage of places to go outside of Dar es Salaam that will take at least four hours of driving, besides the beaches, of course…a great privilege for any city.

A coastal forest reserve situated 20km from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania might not be part of traditional tour routes in Tanzania, yet it attracts a fair number of visits.  Often visited by biologists, it is a  top forest in Africa for bird conservation.


A 20-minute drive from the Julius Nyerere airport, the main attractions include a sacred cave of the Zaramo people, a cattle market, and fascinating bat caves, the historical remains of Colonial times including a railway tunnel and  Kaolinite industry an off course, the forest.


Kaolin deposits of high quality lie below Pugu Hills in the Kisarawe district. These resources are untapped despite a growing demand worldwide. Local and foreign geologists have confirmed Kaolin deposits of  2.3 billion metric tonnes.

Biodiversity richness is high with a wide range of plants, birds, reptiles, insects, and birds.

There are about fourteen known endemic plants, two endemic mammal species, and an endemic subspecies of birds.  Wildlife includes Masaai giraffes, elephants, impalas, warthogs, Tanzanian cheetahs, Africa leopards, spotted hyenas, mongooses, elephant shrews, galagos, civets, side strapped and black back jackals, and over eighty species of birds as well as bat colonies dwelling in the caves.


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Mount Meru: Tanzania cultural tour expeditions- exploring Tengeru


Nearby picturesque Mount Meru slopes, the second highest peak in Tanzania, lies Tengeru, 13km from Arusha on the path to Moshi.

It is simply the best base to explore cultural attractions that make up the rich heritage of the Meru tribe in Tanzania.

There are farms, banana fields and traditional homesteads on the mountain. This village near Arusha is distinct in character.

The venture is set forth exploring old coffee farms with local production of the world’s popular beverage with and then canoe into a  volcanic lake at Mount Meru foothills, home to the best birdwatching and fishing sites.

Ready to give back to communities around Kilimanjaro? Volunteer programs are on offer at all local schools in the surrounds of Mount Kilimanjaro, venture out and discover development and upliftment projects in the Tengeru Community.

Tengeru Activities

Coffee Tour

One of the major highlights in Tengeru is enjoying special home-brewed coffee with the locals.

The coffee plantations in Tengeru journey leads curiosity ventures into local homes and lessons to prepare coffee. The tour offers specially harvested coffee from the Meru community on volcanic Mout Meru foothills.

Lake Duluti Safari Tours

A close view of vegetation in Tengeru with an abundance of fauna and flora at the lakeside. Learn about mystical Meru legends and mysteries linked to Lake Duluti. Get a front seat view of birds, monkeys, reptiles, many other animals, and plants.

This tour will give you an up-close view of Tengeru’s vegetation and you will able to admire the abundant lakeside fauna and flora. You can learn about the Meru legends linked to the lake and its mysteries while getting a front-row viewing of the monkeys, birds, reptiles and many other animals whilst learning about our plant life. A magical destination of authentic traditional roots.

Tengeru Market Tour

The colorful community market, interact live and eat amongst the locals. The busiest market days are Wednesdays and Saturday

Conservation programs in Tengeru

Environment programs in a land rich with vegetation. A source of survival. The main issue is deforestation threatening ecology and the community. Participate in environmental programmes and enjoy a luscious waterfalls tour relaxing in nature marvels

Forest Tours at Mount Meru

The second highest mountain in Tanzania m Mount Meru boasts beautiful forests. Unwind and enjoy magnificence. It is a great destination for preparing for Mount Kilimanjaro expeditions

Walk through the forests of Tanzania’s second-highest mountain.

"Mringaringa" Tour

A traditional gathering place, “Mringaringa”. Listen to the wisdom of thrilling Meru culture and traditional dancing. This venue is also used for settling disputes in the community with presiding Meru elders.

Local Food Preparation and Traditional Dances

Soul soothing music and food celebrations with traditional dancing guarantee a worthwhile experience.

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Take a step a few centuries back: Tanzanian Kilwa Kisiwani (isle of fish)

Welcome to Kilwa Kisiwani, a once upon a time a burgeoning empire, the most powerful and the biggest on the coast of East Africa. The ruins offer insight into once upon a time, labyrinth pathways, majestic mosques and grand palaces. 

A journey into the historic Kilwa is a discovery of incredible walls of wealth.  It may be away from usual tourist pathways, but offers magnificence outlook of living in past centuries.

The city reaching the shore is surrounded by walls and towers of about 12000 inhabitants. The luxurious setting of tree, gardens, every type of vegetable, and the best lemons. citrons and sweetest oranges ever.

The Kilwa isle – A  World Heritage Site

The Island of Kilwa, centuries ago, had trade routes ignited with its abundance of wealth. By the 20th century, it became uninhabited and forgotten. Foreigners and locals had no interest in the Tanzanian coastal ruins.

Around the 1950s,  Portuguese and Arabs, excavated the site to find objects of authenticity.  They succeeded in collecting coins dating back in time. The unique history of Kilwa is currently recognized as a treasure of Swahili history. In the year 1981, it was declared a World Heritage Site.

The Kilwa creation beginnings

The Kilwa Sultanate empire all started in the 10th century, Ali ibn al Hassan, the son of an Abyssinian slave and Emir of Shiraz was caught in a battle of inheritance with six other brothers.

Ali fled, settling on the island of Kilwa that was inhabited by indigenous Bantu dwellers. He began to construct his very own city.  According to legend, he bought Kilwa from the local King, who exchanged the island for enough cloth that would encircle the entire island.

By the time the king changed his mind, Ali already destroyed the bridge connecting Kilwa to the mainland and secured it for himself.

The ruling of Ali Shirazi continued until the year 1277 when the succession crisis led to Mahdali sultans taking over.The first three centuries there were many buildings like the Great Mosque that was started in 1100 and expanded.

Sixteen domes and ornate rooms of arches and pillars made an astonishing complex. When the Morrocan traveler Ibn Battuta visited the island in 1331 he was struck by the splendor of the mosque.

There are smaller mosques scattered all across Kilwa each with distinct features.

The isles ruin date back to the 14th century and early 15th century. Kilwa was a mercantile capital and the wealthy residents built extravagant coral dwellings.

A sultan is alleged to be buried in one of four tombs of the Great house. The triangular robust Makutini Palace was built in the 15th century.

A fortress on the island, Gereza, has wooden portals and elegant crenellation.  The striking ‘Husuni Kubwa’ ( Queen’s house) is perched on a cliff a mile away from the cluster of ruins.  It is said to be the largest pre-colonial Sub Saharan building. There is an 18 dome mosque, vast  hall, courtyards and swimming pool/ The complex has over 100 rooms

 The most powerful city on the East African coast the empire stretches from the north to the south from Kenya to Mozambique.

Ships brought in Arabian quarts, china porcelain, Indian carnelians and ivory and gold from Great Zimbabwe. Spices and perfume filled the air with tortoise shells and pottery in the market. It was the gateway between Asia and Africa.

There are three areas on the Tanzanian coast to add to an itinerary of colorful historic adventures and explore the ruins that go centuries back in time.

  • Kilwa Kisiwani
  • Kilwa Kivinje
  • Kilwa Masoko.

Kilwa Kisiwani

Remnants of extraordinary palaces, ancient tombs and crumbling mosques, the abandoned city of Kilwa Kisiwani is one of the main attractions on the isle.

Kilwa Kivinje

A little town on the mainland it was the center of slave trade in the south. Although slave trade was outlawed in 1873 it is said to have continued until 1880. Made into an administrative center when Germans occupied,

Travellers can explore World War One cannon leftovers as well as a market hall. There is an attractive beach with fisherman provide authentic insight of Tanzania.

Kilwa Masoko

Kilwa Masojo is usually a base when people visit the ruins in Kilwa Kisiwani with pleasant exploration if the Jimbizi Beach.

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica


Our City of Clay in Africa – Djenne in Mali


A UNESCO world heritage site, the ancient town,Djenne in the heart of  Mali,stands on Africa's mighty River Niger. A city of mud houses, streets and city walls. The ochre mud composition gives out an embezzling monochrome look.




The journey to Djenne is like stepping into another era. Little has changed since its prosperous 14th and 15th-century heydays.

Djenne on the flood lands of the Bani and Niger rivers is about 220 miles south-west of Timbuktu. Before  1591, Djenné became a prosperous center of slave, ivory and gold trade. Known as the oldest city in Sub Sahara Africa,  famous for its Great Mosque and market.

It was founded around 800AD by merchants and flourished. The meeting place for Sudan desert traders and Guinea tropical forests, it became an impactful trading center and thrived due to its direct river connection with Timbuktu and the head of all trade routes leading to salt and gold mines.

Controlled by empires of Morrocan kings it expanded featuring products from the north and central Africa until the French occupied in in 1893.

Commercial functions were then taken over by Mopti town in the confluence of Bani and Niger rivers, in the northeast,  An agricultural trade center, Djenne boasts Muslim Architecture and a great mosque.

The great mosque built in 1905 is a classic Sahelian mud architecture.

The highlight of each year is an event when annually, the inhabitants of the town gather and refine the mud structure, giving it a new layer to replace what torrential rains fade out. The festival of plastering event: La Fete de crepissage. 

The labors of plasterers are accompanied with a beating of drums. The drums are perched on wooden spikes that stick out of the walls, serving as permanent scaffolding and decoration.

Younger girls carry bowls and buckets  of water and mud from the river bed, and older women pound millet making pancakes,

Special meals are made by each family to celebrate the occasion. Proud of their architectural heritage the people of Djenne have long resisted paved roads and any introduction of electricity.

Only a handful of cars exist in Djenne belonging mostly to government officials that run development programmes for sustainability.

All new buildings and even the hospital are built in traditional style and technique binding the river mus with straw and grass

The building material is plentiful and cheap and the clay keeps houses cool, even with the scorching hot sun outside.

Labor for repairing is becoming a challenge in present day when most move into cities with computers, email, and television.

The architectural gem receives foreign aid to maintain its splendor and keep it the same, for another two decades and more!

Welcome!  #ExploremotherlandAfrica


CreatePreneurAfrica -Tastebud treats from Chef Li

READY WITH A SENSATIONAL MENU  to tantalize all TASTEBUDS, meet Createpreneur Africa, Chef Li.

Linda Nirina Rojohasina Mazibuko, born in the culturally and culinary diverse island of Madagascar, eventually relocated to her father’s homeland, South Africa. Chef Li’s cooking styles from multiple influences topple divine and delectable taste sensations.

Growing up with her mother, a musician from Madagascar, and her grandmother in South Africa , her Zulu heritage was a divine fusion into the mixture of Madagascar cooking style delights.

A member of ‘Çhefs in Africa’ she ranked amongst the top ten of Top Chefs in SA.

After graduating at a culinary art school in South Africa, she has been a key contributor to respected kitchens all over Africa. Trained by prominent chefs, she has designed delectable brands of influence.

Instagram @chefli_
Twitter @chefmazibuko
Facebook Page: ChefLi


1. What drives you?

The only thing that drives me is my passion. It’s the idea that food brings so much joy to the soul as well as nations together.

2. What is your true passion in life?

My true passion in life is love expressed through food and music. Every time I am in the kitchen I feel like I am creating a symphony of flavors. I like to listen to classical music while cooking. I also sing at my local church called Hillsong Johannesburg.

3. How did you find your passion? How old were you?

I found my passion for music when I was about 3 or 4 years old. My grandfather was a legendary musician in Madagascar and I used to follow him everywhere, as my mother recalls.

My passion for food started when I was about 9 years old, I used to sit in the kitchen watching my mother cook our meals. It was fascinating to me.

Eventually, she let me cook with her when I got a little bit older, surprisingly I went to WITS University after school but ended up dropping out because I couldn’t stop thinking about being a Chef. LOL! My mother was freaked out about it but my dad was very supportive.

Eventually, she began to see how I was flourishing & finally understood that this is what I was made for.

4. What about your passion appeals to you the most?

What appeals to me the most is that it brings people together from all walks of life. There are no stereotypes or silly debates about it. It’s just something that makes everyone happy and brings healing to the soul.

5. What drove you to make money from your passions?

Well, it is my bread and butter, I don’t see myself slaving away behind an office desk all day so I need to cook to live. But I do this mostly out of love. Don’t let me cook for you when I am sad or depressed, it’s going to be horrible. I cook with my soul.

6. When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

I was first paid when a family friend asked me to bake a cake for them.

7. What kept you going when you thought of giving up?

My one friend, Tiffany, keeps me going through her words of encouragement. She knows me so well and always knows how to get me out of the ruts I tend to put myself into (LOL). I tend to doubt myself sometimes. The last time I was about to give up, she got me back on track and then TOP CHEF SA contacted me.

8. What motivates you every day to become more successful?

What motivates me is the fact that I am the first real chef in my family. Also, because I am a mixed breed child, I have two families to make proud.

9. What do you have to say to all the people who doubted you?

I don’t really have much to tell them, I like to work and produce in silence. They will just see the fruits.

10. What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

I would like to tell them to embrace and enjoy their journeys. Not everyone is going to make it in the same way, at the same time. You’re never too old or too young to start something, use what you have, the rest will follow.


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