Exploring Splendor in Tanzania – Festive Season Gift: Free Promotion

 

Thank you for your quest to join the journey and #ExploremotherlandAfrica.

 

Please feel free to download you free promotional copy from the 29 December to the 5th of January.

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CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

Cape town filmmaker, Kurt Orderson explored artistic expression in his early lifetime beginnings. After mastering crafts of his creations from his backyard in the Cape 'ghettos'(beyond Table Mountain),he ventured out into the world, rising up to becoming one of Africa's leading filmmakers.

Kurt initiated his career during his studies as a trainee at the SABC, ( South African Broadcasting Corporation), earning mere stipends for daily living expenses.

He defined his unique aesthetic voice and was soon acknowledged as a director and cinematographer on several key productions.

He founded his independent production company, “Azania Rizing”.

“Azania Rizing” is a tool for the African diaspora to rise up and map African legacies around the world on a global storytelling platform.

His major works include:

  •  Definition of Freedom, examining the role of  Hip Hop in South Africa. It was screened at the Toronto and Vancouver  hip-hop festival  winning the best documentary award at the Atlanta Hip hop film festival
  •  Tribute to Lucky Dube, the tribute to legendary reggae artist Lucky Dube was filmed in South Africa, London, and Jamaica. It was awarded the Best Documentary  Award at the  Silicon Valley African Film Festival in  2013.
  • The Pan-African Express, a journey of six young men, students from Atlanta who travel to  South Africa and trying to understand people living with  HIV and Aids. The film was funded by The Oprah Winfrey Foundation.
  • Eldorado, a feature chronicles the journey of four friends in a Gauteng township in South Africa. It won the Special mention South Africa Feature film at the  Durban International Film Festival in 2011
  •  Breathe Again,  features Derrick Orderson, a marginalized swimmer from the  Cape Flats who rose above his livelihood in an abnormal society of inhumane prejudice. It was screened at the Encounters film festival and Durban International Film Festival and several film festivals worldwide.
  • The Prodigal Son 
  • Visibly Invisible

“The Unseen Ones”

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds” Bob Marley

Current Projects

Not in My Neighborhood explores spatial violence, current gentrification and the post-apartheid era. It compares Cape Town , Johannesburg and New York uncovering the threads that exist between people that are miles apart.

 

Picture for the documentary Not in my Neighborhood. September 2016 – São Paulo – Brazil

#CreateoreneurAfrica – The Soul Journey of Kurt Orderson

Tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?

What drives me is ultimately the great history and achievements of Africa, and I guess also within a broad order global perspective is my people that inspire me and drive me. I am from South Africa, a very specific region in South Africa, Cape Town.

More specifically I am from a township from that is part of a strip of what would be known as the “ghettos”,  the Cape Flats, there is a rich history of storytelling, a great significance of the epicenter of what the foundation of the space, basically built on the legacy of apartheid. The legacy of architectural and apartheid spatial planning ideally separated people  (which was an actual policy with the group areas act ) that had a great significance of breaking up families, literally…… families scattered.

I think what maintains a traditional oral form of storytelling, obviously remained significant, it inspired my body of work ultimately that’s my drive, Africa’s history, Africa’s achievements. One is inspired by  Africa’s legacy, the epicenter of academia and  Timbuktoo…storytelling and the arts and crafts of storytelling ultimately started there and spread across the globe.

My true passion….well I am very passionate about just listening, sitting and listening to people telling stories, whether happy or sad,  ultimately passion for me personally, is driven by a deep desire of wanting to change the landscape of..change  how people perceive each other. I think it’s those stories of those people who done it in the past and are still doing it, that’s what drives my passion. I am inspired by their passion, I think I apply it to my life.That for me is what passion is. Passion goes deeper, the engine or driving force for one to do something. I think ultimately wanting to do something is ultimately passion…the driving force…

How did you find your passion and how old were you?

How did I find my passion….well that’s an interesting question? I think for me when I finished high school, I was definitely inspired by the visual medium and visual arts. There was obviously the influence of television and Hollywood tv,  I guess, but also my parents influenced me.

My father was a screen printer, which is ultimately a visual artist, although he didn’t call himself that, based on conditioning of the system that shaped him, apartheid South Africa. The idea that you were limited to do certain things when it comes to art black folks were deprived in a large historical moment of what the status quo says what you do and what you can become. My father is a strong reference to creating images and applying it to a t-shirt, applies similarly script to screen.

I think its an interesting analogy, metaphor for making films, taking a rich traditional medium and applying it to my work. I think that is how I found my passion.

How old was I?   I think my first reference to start noticing…I don’t know if I can say noticing, more where I picked up the idea that I was passionate about the visual medium, I think I was maybe thirteen years old or fourteen…..

I was locked out of my parent’s house, of course. That time there were no cellphones. I’m from a family of a family of five kids, my parents both worked, I was locked out one day.  I went to the backyard, my father had a workshop in the back of the yard, and I found a hammer and flat nose screwdriver.

I used the hammer and flat nose to carve out my name on a piece of wood and was quite impressed by myself. Wow, no one before that necessarily initiated anything like that. I wasn’t exposed to artistic expression and multiple forms of what artists do, I carved out my name, varnished it and made it immaculate. Later on meeting people who carved for a profession, creating amazing things. I always reference my first carving, that was my flame of inspiration for being an artist, use a visual medium for storytelling.

What about your passion appeals to you the most? 

What about my passionate appeals to me the most… I guess the privilege to being a filmmaker, that being my passion but also to add to that, I feel very blessed to basically get paid for my passion, for my hobby… I would say …because we love film so much I  will do it for free, that’s how deep our passion for cinema lies…and getting paid to do something you love, your passion is a heavy blessing.

What appeals to me most is the idea of  shared history and shared knowledge, when someone allows you into their household to tell you their stories…. you being inspired and, relating on a level of  “oh I knew someone who had a similar idea about this or that .”

 I think that is what the driving force is …..sharing communal space, sharing narratives, sharing stories,  sharing politics, sharing knowledge….that for me a strong appeal to my passion…

What drove you to make money from your passions?

What drove me to make money out of my passion…well you know in real talk, not to romanticize the question too much. We, unfortunately, live in a very capitalist society, we inherited capitalism,, were born into a capitalistic society…..that on one level, right,, that reality of things, we need to eat right, we need to sustain ourselves… in terms of monetary exchange we apple or tomato,whatever……what well I just realised that my craft, my talent, my blessing, I can get paid for it.

For me, there was a strong driving force around craft, like crafting what is my voice, what is my aesthetic, what does Kurt bring across in a common sharing space as a filmmaker as a storyteller. It was first defining my voice, after defining that idea, that is when I felt to make money.

People  want to hire you, because they want that aesthetic that you ideally represent, that was my passion for making art and getting paid for my art, as an independent filmmaker, as an African filmmaker, things are rough out there…and we want to tell our own stories on our own terms, the system itself makes it very difficult for us to sustain ourselves. I need to work like a plumber who works with tools and I need to buy those tools. That is the reality of things

When was the first time you were paid for your passion?

The first time I got paid for something… I can’t recall exactly when that was when that moment was…there was a few moment I think. I think  I worked on a television show and I was a contestant, but I also worked on a show. It was a show on SABC2, I was like 18 or 19.

We were trainees and there was a little  stipend that they paid us for traveling money or whatever. It was for generic work on set like organizing cables and assisting the floor, production. I remember very little , but that’s when I realised you can get paid for this. I was still studying at that time as well.

 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?

What kept me going. I have come through multiple crossroads moments asking myself is this really sustainable, what I do, filmmaking? Filmmaking is really hard, difficult, expensive artistic form to choose. A painter can get some canvas and some paints  make a  killer piece, get to an art market  for a million and boom there we go

For filmmakers, the reality of getting a camera, getting all the equipment you need, and then on top of it, getting a team to operate the tools, that’s a whole process on its own. These things are hard when you off the grid and not part of the mainstream in the system and don’t necessarily want to be part of it.

That’s a very conscious choice, you can just join tv and become a commissioning editor, produce for television and things will be different, it will be a completely different narrative, everything is there,, there is funding for you and they hire you.

Food, clothes and shelter have no politics.

Mutabaruka

As an independent filmmaker or producer, it is very difficult… I only recently mastered the art form of really raising money for my films, for many years my films were independent, self-funded at times.

Now its like I understand more about the industry, how to write the right proposals, and apply to the right people and getting the money and managing the money.

When you at the lowest moment at the crux, paying rent, paying teams, paying crews, and rejections. Rejection is a big thing for filmmakers , filmmakers are sensitive beings, we are fragile as well  in this…. broken world

These are all the challenges that come on your journey, it applies to life as well… life ain’t easy.  The world is not nice, the world is cruel, the life we find peace and sanity within ourselves, the people close to you. There are your therapists, they are your motivational speakers, they push you and say we believe in you, that’s what keeps me going.

 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?

 

What motivates me to be successful, what motivation every day. Whats the motivation?  I think this idea that, on one level is that  African history, African stories were for the longest time ever was told through the voice of the colonizer and the aesthetic and the lens of the colonizer…..

These were told in a biased fashion…for me now, as a fellow African filmmaker, it is our duty. I feel strongly for film to be part of the restoration process, the healing journey that we are experiencing and going through as black people across the globe and the trauma that we collectively experience.

How do we heal? What are the healing mechanisms? Now to be honest with you, we don’t have a clear answer to that question. I feel collective communal sharing through a  very powerful visual medium like television or film, then you can project to the rest of the world and share that and say in order for us to be this idea of one world and one shared history.

Everyone has to have the opportunity to share their stories through there own  POV or point of view,  I think that’s powerful ways of sharing. We all have common stories. We share a common history of people all over the world which ultimately makes us human.

Every generation blames the generation before them.

 

Racial ideas and ideology, culture and religion etcetera, are just all divisive mechanisms put in place for a form divide, rule and conquer….not to be cliched,  we have the same blood and all of that. I have transformed, transgressed that phase. I have passed that idea

Anger is fine. Anger is important. We have to be angry. We can’t all just hear  I am sorry and forgive right now,

What if I don’t want to forgive you right, now, and maybe  I want to make a film about that as part of the idea of forgiveness, as collective forgiveness.

That makes film become an interesting mechanism and medium, for multiple purposes. I feel,  personally, we can use film a methodology of social healing for healing the self and healing communities.

 

What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?

What I have to say about all the people who doubted me…interesting question.  I always think about, one person comes to mind, a schoolteacher.

I wasn’t necessarily the greatest student, to be honest in high school.  I  probably could have done more. I was like, reckless and mischievous. I would say, I gave a lot of trouble.

Was I a rebel? Not sure, I don’t want to throw those words around. One teacher just didn’t like me. I was thinking about her the other day,

I think you always doubted me, I don’t think you ever believed in me, and now that my work is out there in the mainstream? I wonder if she saw my name out there. I wonder what she would think, after seeing what I had done.

I don’t want to reference people that doubted me.  I am not going to make a film for people. I make films am driven to or inspired to make. I don’t care about whether people agree with my standpoint, I love those who love me on the real level, beyond blood, blood relatives. My family is universal.  I am very blessed. We share this brokenness.As a broken people, we come together and we form this path of healing, the heal of our wounds….

What advice do you give to aspiring creatives who look up to you?

What advice do I give to those aspiring creatives that look up to me?

The advice ideally would be to always use motivation. The idea of keeping it moving or just do it.  Life is about the idea of inspiring the other, inspiring other people. I think for me,  that is what life is about. Me inspiring other people and continuing the human change of inspiration.

One has to know your craft, know your blessing, identify your blessing.  But also knowing that this is a  very complicated world that we living in. There will be multiple stumbling blocks with a lot of us.  You carrying the torch, you carrying the great torch of your ancestors. You dont have a choice  , you have to keep that torch alight. That is the flame, the driving force, the fuel.

More important is to have a voice. Have a political voice. I don’t mean party politics.  Having a geopolitical view of the world and its complexities. An understanding of global politics. Deciphering the bullshit of what the news tells you, projecting that in your work. Be that change you ultimately want to see.

What you see is what you see. What you know is different

Mutabaruka

Welcome #ExploremotherlandAfrica

Slavery is not African history. Slavery interrupted African history.

Mutabaruka

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Island of Madagascar- Lalah Raindimby

Launching Soon: #CreatepreneurAfrica

Do you fit the bill? Fill in the form and touch base! Feature in the publication of the millennium, #CreatepreneurAfrica!

My mission to continue an everlasting journey for the publication of the millennium manuscript seemed to be turning into a never-ending mission with a series of  #CreatepreneurAfrica sequels in continuous motion……..

I came into contact with Lalah Raindimby ,  a native of Madagascar, she hails from the southeastern portion of the Island country in an area called Fianarantsoa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She is from the ethnic Betsileo group in that country.

Betsileo are widely known for their special artistic creativity with own traditional dialect called Horija Betsileo.

 

Lalah is the second generation musician and vocalist being the daughter of region’s Famous legendary artist Known as Raindimby.

 

 

Raindimby is credited with making this unique form of music widely known throughout the country and beyond the borders of Madagascar.

 

LALAH,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life?
My true passion is my music. For me, music is a means of expression of life as a human being. Performing the folk and cultural music of my homeland allows me to keep my heritage close to me and to build upon the legacy of my dad and other noted performers of his generation. The music gives me motivation and strength in life.
How did you find your passion and how old were you?
At a very young age, I think I was six years old when I observed my dad and other family members rehearsing for a performance in the house.  

I began to sing. By the time I was a teenager my dad invited me on stage to perform with him.  I joined him on many occasions and found that performing was enjoyable and the audience response was encouraging.

From that time until the present music has been a critical part of my life. My first love and my passion.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
I find that when I am engaged with the music I become spiritually transformed and purely focused on my music and forget about the troubles of the world.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
As a teenager performing with my father and realizing that my father was singing as professional and making money from his performance that he shared with me and I realize in addition being spiritually gratifying I could make money as a professional singer.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
As a teenager performing with my dad.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
The memory of my late father and reflecting on the sacrifice that he made to expose the musical tradition Horija Betsileo of our people to the entire country and beyond.
 What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
I have in effect become an Ambassador to keep that musical and cultural tradition alive and pass it on to the next generation.
What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
I must continue to strive in those ideas which are dear to me and I cannot allow them to stop me from perusing my goals and dreams.
 What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
Well, you are going to face lots of challenges but don’t give up on your dreams and your passion, just believe in yourself and work hard to achieve the goals you have set for yourself.

Music by Lalah Raindimby

Lalah Raindimy Soul Sounds

Get ready for Right Brain Marketing- CreateprenuerAfrica# ,starting up in the southern region of Africa!

 

“#CreatePreneurAfrica” Launching Soon: Publication of the Millenium!

 

COMING SOON. GET READY FOR……………

 

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica 

Launch of the millennium!

Meet  our top  #CreatePeneurAfrica features thus far

A special welcome to #CreatePreneurAfrica, 'Publication of the Millenium', launching soon on all media platforms...

Greetings from  Patrice Juah, 'Africa's guide to the future', seed host of CreatepreneurAfrica, the soul  journey, showcasing the neverending treasure of skills and talent from the motherland of Africa .

"If you listen carefully you will hear all about the awe inspiring  future of Africa calling out....."

#CreatepreneurAfrica, Liberian Patrice Juah – “A Gem of Unimaginable Proportions”

 

 

#ExploremotherlandAfrica.com

#CreatePreneurAfrica- Africa icon Hakeem Kae Kazim- takes the world cinema stage by storm!

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Nigeria’s sounds of ‘Positive Force’ – Femi Kuti

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica, Tanzania Rhythm with Saxophonist Zephania Malembela

 

#CreatePrenuerAfrica: South Africa’s Usha Seejarim’s soul journey into artistic realms linking human connectivity

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Riaan Hendricks, prolific South African filmmaker on the “Ramothopo the Centenarian” journey

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Island of Madagascar- Lalah Raindimby

“#CreatepreneurAfrica”:Touching Base with Shabani Mpita-Tanzania

‘#CreatepreneurAfrica’ – Pablo Zungu Art wonders in Tanzania

 

ALL THE WAY FROM SOUTH AFRICA: Meet Tu Nokwe– LIving Music Legend and more!

 

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

 

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#CreatepreneurAfrica -Nigeria’s broadcaster,Tushbee the Tori Goddess……

ALL THE WAY FROM EAST AFRICA: Meet Shabani Mpita,  specialized field and tour guide  as well as a creative artist

http://exploremotherlandafrica.com/turning-creative-passions-into-profit/

#CreatepreneurAfrica : Story-teller, Poet and Filmmaker, Cape Town’s Weaam Williams

From Lagos Nigeria, Dance Sensation Taiwo Soyebo the founder of Tourism expression, poetry, and arts festival, T.E.P.A.F

#CreatepreneurAfrica @Taiwo Soyebo – Dancing away in Nigeria

 

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town’s ‘global lens’ wonder Ayesha Kae-Kazim

From Morogoro Tanzania- Meet the world of animation and the JUU Afrikan Festival Clenga Ngatigwa

CreatePreneurAfrica@Cleng’a Ng’atigwa- Animation and traditional music in Tanzania

From Bagamoyo in Tanzania – Meet drummer from the acrobat and drummer group, Mafisi, meet Thomas Mura.

“#CreatepreneurAfrica @Thomas Mura: Soul Rhythm from Bagamoyo

 

From Tanzania, meet master sculptor and artist  Saidi Mbungu, and his passion to share his skill and uplift coming generations with his Africa Modern Art project.

“#CreatepreneurAfrica @Thomas Mura: Soul Rhythm from Bagamoyo

#CreatePreneurAfrica Zziwa Aaron Alone, Uganda’s King of Guerilla Fimmaking!

 

Filmmaker taking the World by Storm- Meet Kurt Orderson– Azania Rizing!

CreatepreneurAfrica – Cape Town filmmaker Kurt Orderson conquers the world with ‘Azania Rizing’

 

From South Africa meet the award-winning actress, storyteller and community leader Andrea Dondolo.

#CreatePreneurAfrica-Andrea Dondolo, Queen Spirit Shining Light in South Africa

Tantalizing Tastebud Treat sensation- Chef Li!

CreatePreneurAfrica -Tastebud treats from Chef Li

 

Hakeem Kae-Kazim , Africa’s leading actor taking the world cinema stage by storm!

#CreatePreneurAfrica- Africa icon Hakeem Kae Kazim- takes the world cinema stage by storm!

 

He is about to spread light all over Africa. Meet our leading scientist Emmanuel Obayagbona

#CreatePreneurAfrica-Meet Africa’s Fastest Rising Scientist : Emmanuel Obayagbona

Our Pan African media proprietor Rosie Motene takes center stage in raising Africa’s stream of talent.

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Pan Africa media proprieter – Our Voice of Africa : Rosie Motene

Africa’s poetic vision meet Kariuki wa Nyamu, sharing his journey into the light of words.

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Africa Poetic vision : Kenya’s Kariuki wa Nyamu

Proudly Tanzanian actor Kihaka GND is ready to shine, universally!

#CreateprenuerAfrica – Proudly Tanzanian Actor – Kihaka GND

Mak Manaka ,South Africa poet-  spreading the word with  soul purpose

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Poetically speaking : Mak Manaka

Jihan El Tahri, Egyptian filmmaker  raises consciousness with awakening documentaries across the continent

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Visionary Soul Filmmaker Jihan El Tahri

 

Afrodazzled’ Kenyan Artist Cyrus Kabiru in his spectacular vision of spectacles

#CreatepreneurAfrica- ‘Afrodazzled’ Kenyan Artist Cyrus Kabiru- “C-Stunner Spectacular Spectacles”

Nigerian Fashionista UKachukwu Okechukwu journeys us through his design of the century vision

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Nigerian Fashionista Supreme – Ukachukwu Okechukwu

 

Meet Donald Molosi – he has some critical love letter for humanity!

CreatePreneurAfrica – Botswana’s Donald Molosi’s “Critical love letters to Humanity”

Mountaineer Monde Sitole is taking Africa to new heights. Are we ready to join him and reach new peaks?

#CreatePreneurAfrica- Mountaineer Monde Sitole, Peak performance “Reaching Heights of Soul Liberation”

 

 

Meet trailblazer filmmaker Vincent Moloi. The voice of the nation

#CreatepreneurAfrica Vincent Moloi : Trailblazer filmmaker capturing human existence dynamics!

#CreatepreneurAfrica – La Famosà – Dominican fashion mogul in Uganda

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Oluwabukola Michael Nelson, Making Nigerian dreams a reality!

#CreatepreneurAfrica – Sandile Ngidi : ‘Africa’s Literary Empire’

#CreatepreneurAfrica- Nigeria’s Lieutenenant Alexander Emmanuel Ochogwu

#CreatePreneurAfrica – Conversations with Tu Nokwe

My venture continued. The final touches took an extraordinary connection – The Journey of my soul. My conversations with Tu Nokwe sparkled the final touches of #CreatepreneurAfrica.

An excerpt from the “Publication of the Millenium”, #Createpreneur Africa: Tu Nokwe- ‘The Light of Africa’

Meet our CreatePreneur™,Tu Nokwe,a legendary musician all the way from South Africa. 

Born and raised during the mainstream helms of the detrimental apartheid era into an artistic family that chose to soar above the pressing system and created Amajika.

This was a youth and child development arts organization to boost self-esteem and counteract the collating mental abuse that shattered mass populations emotionally.

 

We explore her breathtaking lifestyle, delving into the roots of soul inspiration as we explore her pathways, sharing her journey of self-discovery on a road of survival.

 

Tu Nokwe,tell us what drives you? What is your true passion in life? 
My passion.My passion.Where do I start? We could end up with episodes of my true passions as they flow into so many channels. Well as you know, my outlet of expression is the creation of sounds and soothing soul rhythms, pulsating heartbeats in blissful melodies.

“I am creative, I am physical, and I am mental. I am emotional, but most of all I am a spiritual being having a human experience. That is just the beginning of the “Journey of My Soul”

How did you find your passion and how old were you?
I think I was born into it and grew up thriving in the presence all around me. My inner drive & determination fuelled me to learn to play the guitar without a guitar in my hands, but two chairs strung with wool from one chair to the other;using an old guitar tutor to position the fingers in cord formations and coordination. 

My career started when I was eighteen months old! In a commercial for a soap brand. I come from a family of musicians rooted in historical ingenuity of memorable creations.
What about your passion appeals to you the most? 
It is an outlet of soul expression. I explore the mantra

‘Order creates comfort’. Creative self-management is the core of my spirit as I share and display self-management tools leaving those around me invigorated with a soul-filled purpose.
What drove you to make money from your passions?
The gift of abundance is an asset, allowing open doors to explore. Positive affirmations to call on wealth is a stepping-stone to encounter all barriers in the most lucid times and delve into ‘The Light of Africa’, beaming promise of abundance. 

Africa is rooted in wealth despite the world image of poverty-stricken and downtrodden bereavement that is propagated and installed in the mass media. We are born on the soil rooted in wealth and treasures beyond human imagination. It is ours.
When was the first time you were paid for your passion?
Every engagement was abundant on spiritual rewards. My first performance that brought in a cash flow was at the age of 18 at a wedding with the ‘Black Angels’, a local band. And then when I turned 13  at the annual jazz festival 'Milk Africa'(with the “Black Angels” - the Sneddon Theatre at the University of Natal in Kwa-Zulu Natal & the epic movie 'Shaka Zulu'. When I was 18, I earned a living doing African braids at a hair salon.
 What kept you going when you thought about giving up?
I launched the first African Diary - Journey of my Soul” over eight years. Initially it was my supportive tool for self-management. 

The project sparked off out of a concerned calling out from the lack of purpose and low self-esteem that brewed on a daily basis. My resilience to counteract all obstacles, keep focus and having my effective presence engraved in all souls I touched with my talent. I never gave up; I knew there were many doors open amongst the few that closed before me.
What motivates you every day to be even more successful?
My mantra I never cease to chant is ‘Order creates comfort. I am a spiritual being and give thanks each day for all my blessings. The campus for my state of being is joy & happiness. Not everything may come to you at the time you desire it to. However, in Gods time, what is meant to be will be.
 What do you have to say to all of the people who doubted you?
All I can say to those who doubted me is advise them to rise above their fears and soar at rising heights. We all need somebody to lean on.
What advice do you give to aspiring creative is who look up to you?
“Journey of my Soul” was initially used by uprising performing artists in Amajika Youth and children arts under the auspices of the Nokwe Creative development foundation founded by my family. 

During 1976 when there was a need to boost, self esteem in the helm of the grueling apartheid System in my country. It became clear that as an artist my purpose was to devote time and energy to empower the children of Africa. 

I discovered that self-work had to begin with me. Once I had a holistic understanding of myself, I could reach out to others. My advice to aspiring creative’s is journey to define you and rediscover your LIFE purpose. If you follow my life story, my hope is that you will explore exercises and concepts to develop who you are. I wish you all the best with the ‘Journey of your Soul’

 

Welcome #ExploreMotherlandAfrica